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I needed to create an algorithm which will (efficiently) take an old array and a new array and give me back the changes between the two (which items added, which removed). It happens to need to be in JavaScript (to run in the browser) but the algorithm's more important than the language.

This is what I came up with: http://jsbin.com/osewu3/13. Can anyone see any problems with that/suggest any improvements?

Thanks!

Code Listing:

function diff(o, n) {
  // deal with empty lists
  if (o == undefined) o = [];
  if (n == undefined) n = [];

  // sort both arrays (or this won't work)
  o.sort(); n.sort();

  // don't compare if either list is empty
  if (o.length == 0 || n.length == 0) return {added: n, removed: o};

  // declare temporary variables
  var op = 0; var np = 0;
  var a = []; var r = [];

  // compare arrays and add to add or remove lists
  while (op < o.length && np < n.length) {
      if (o[op] < n[np]) {
          // push to diff?
          r.push(o[op]);
          op++;
      }
      else if (o[op] > n[np]) {
          // push to diff?
          a.push(n[np]);
          np++;
      }
      else {
          op++;np++;
      }
  }

  // add remaining items
  if( np < n.length )
    a = a.concat(n.slice(np, n.length));
  if( op < o.length )
    r = r.concat(o.slice(op, o.length));

  return {added: a, removed: r}; 
}

(I have also posted this as a potential solution to another SO question, here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1187518/javascript-array-difference/3476612#3476612)

share|improve this question
    
Yep, looks like a textbook implementation of the standard set intersection algorithm (which uses a modified version of the "merge" algorithm of mergesort fame). Good work coming up with it yourself. –  David Aug 13 '10 at 12:19
    
@David. Thanks... I think :) –  Ian Grainger Aug 13 '10 at 13:41
    
Looks about right. You don't really need the special check for empty arrays: if there are any, the loop will immediately exit and you'll get the same results. –  rbp Aug 13 '10 at 14:09
    
@rbp Seemed like it was worth the check because there's definitely a case where one is empty and in that case I don't want to do anything. But actually, now I look at it - it's only a difference of 4 comparison operations or so, so I think you're right. I might do that, then. –  Ian Grainger Aug 13 '10 at 14:17
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7 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following page has a function that removes one array from another and can be used to give you the 2 values. Remove items from a JavaScript Array with RemoveArrayItems()

var newItemsAdded=RemoveArrayItems(oldArray,newArray);
var ItemsRemoved =RemoveArrayItems(newArray,oldArray);
share|improve this answer
    
Seems like a fine approach. I tried to profile it but couldn't get very far. Certainly seems comparable to mine, and if I were to start again, I'd definitely use that! –  Ian Grainger Aug 13 '10 at 13:39
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There is no undefined constant. You should check the type of the variable instead:

if (typeof o === 'undefined') o = [];

Edit:

As Tim Down showed, the property is actually defined in the standard, but as the standard doesn't define it to be constant, it's unreliable and should not be used.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, please explain. Undefined seems to work OK for me. Here's the reference page for undefined on w3schools: w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_undefined.asp ('The undefined property is supported in all major browsers.'). –  Ian Grainger Aug 13 '10 at 13:11
    
There is no "undefined property". It's just a variable that is not assigned a value. That is easily demonstrated by assigning a value to it, and you can test that it's no longer undefined. If it was really a property you would not be able to change it's value. So, the "undefined property" is really not supported in any browser at all. –  Guffa Aug 13 '10 at 15:05
    
OK, great. Thanks! –  Ian Grainger Aug 13 '10 at 15:10
    
Here's something that proves you're right, I'll let w3schools.com about it! jsbin.com/ajolu3/2 –  Ian Grainger Aug 13 '10 at 15:33
    
Well, saying there is no "undefined property" is false: undefined actually is a property of the global object with a value of undefined (ECMAScript spec, 15.1.1.3). You're right that its value can be assigned to something else. –  Tim Down Aug 13 '10 at 19:28
show 3 more comments

I created a speed test between two possible implementations.

Source code:

function diff1 (o, n) { 
  // deal with empty lists 
  if (o == undefined) o = []; 
  if (n == undefined) n = []; 

  // sort both arrays (or this won't work) 
  o.sort(); n.sort(); 

  // don't compare if either list is empty 
  if (o.length == 0 || n.length == 0) return {added: n, removed: o}; 

  // declare temporary variables 
  var op = 0; var np = 0; 
  var a = []; var r = []; 

  // compare arrays and add to add or remove lists 
  while (op < o.length && np < n.length) { 
      if (o[op] < n[np]) { 
          // push to diff? 
          r.push(o[op]); 
          op++; 
      } 
      else if (o[op] > n[np]) { 
          // push to diff? 
          a.push(n[np]); 
          np++; 
      } 
      else { 
          op++;np++; 
      } 
  } 

  // add remaining items 
  if( np < n.length ) 
    a = a.concat(n.slice(np, n.length)); 
  if( op < o.length ) 
    r = r.concat(o.slice(op, o.length)); 

  return {added: a, removed: r};  
}

function diff2 (o, n) {
        // convert array items to object members
    var objO = {}, objN = {};
    for (var i = 0; i < o.length; i++) {
        objO[o[i]] = 1;
    }
    for (var i = 0; i < n.length; i++) {
        objN[n[i]] = 1;
    }

    var a = []; var r = []; 

    for (var i in objO) {
        if (i in objN) {
            delete objN[i];
        }
        else {
            r.push (i);
        }
    }
    for (var i in objN) {
        a.push (i);
    }
    return {added: a, removed: r};
}

var o = [], n = [];
for (var i = 0; i < 300000; i++) {
    if (i % 2 == 0) {
        o.push (i);
    }
    if (i % 3 == 0) {
        n.push (i);
    }
}

var start = new Date ();
diff1 (o, n);
var end1 = new Date ();
diff2 (o, n);
var end2 = new Date ();

alert ((end1 - start) + ", " + (end2 - end1));

The disadvantage of diff2 that the returned arrays (added, removed) are not sorted.

Speed Test:

IE7: diff1: 2578ms, diff2: 1906ms

IE8: diff1: 1953ms, diff2: 1152ms

Firefox: diff1: 254ms, diff2: 527ms

Opera: diff1: 143ms, diff2: 253ms

Safari: diff1: 466ms, diff2: 657ms

Chrome: diff1: 734ms, diff2: 581ms

Conclusion: diff1 is faster in Firefox, Opera and Safari, diff2 is faster in IE and Chrome.

share|improve this answer
    
Are these times for real? Then both algorithms are way too slow to be of any use. –  KooiInc Aug 14 '10 at 6:01
    
ok, sorry for the earlier comment: didn't see the array size you used –  KooiInc Aug 14 '10 at 8:14
    
great, thanks! I'll leave it with mine for now, then, seeing as I understand it :) –  Ian Grainger Aug 14 '10 at 10:08
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Your algorithm looks pretty good for having come up with it yourself! Congrats!
Keep in mind thugh that while your algorithm reveals changes of the content of two arrays (item removal, etc), it does not reveal changes of content order (or removed items being added again later on).

You could for example remove item 1 of array a and add it back in later on, technically changing array a from array b, however remaining unnoticed by your algorithm.

array a: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}

array b: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}

array a: {2, 3, 4, 5, 6}    //after a.shift();
array a: {2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 1} //after a.push(1);

=> a != b //your algorithm would return "a == b" though

Your alorithm might be sufficient for your particular needs, however for a really strict array diff algorithm I would try to port a string diff algorithm. Basically changing the algorithm so instead of comparing chars/runs in a string it compares the items in your array.

Javascript string diff algorithm (JS Code)

share|improve this answer
    
The lists I have are always already sorted on the server (I actually commented out the sort line in my implementation ;) ). You say string dif - actually - someone in a blog post suggested just creating a string, using a regex (or set of them), then splitting it again. Interesting approach. But I had no idea of efficiency. –  Ian Grainger Aug 13 '10 at 14:19
    
Well, string diffs need to compare strings for context sensitive changes. (which the sorting would eliminate) As strings (at least in many languages) are nothing but char arrays, my immediate thought was to just handle array objects (or their hashes) like you'd do with chars in string diffing. So instead of "does char a match char b?" in your comparison check you'd rather say "does object/hash a match object/hash b?". –  Regexident Aug 13 '10 at 17:15
    
Oh and I wouldn't recommend the "regex" trick. (even though I love regex, hence my username) They are for CFLs only, hence pretty useless (as in "error-prone") for almost any context sensitive stuff. I'd rather use object hashes and compare them, like I wrote in my comment above. I said "string diff" only for the fact that string diff are context sensitive and as that's what you'd most likely want when comparing arrays. (at least for a universally usable comparison algorithm, your particular case might just suffice quite well with your algorithm). –  Regexident Aug 13 '10 at 17:22
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I think the implementation of the diff method is correct, the time complexity of your algorithm is O(n * log(n)) because of the sort methods. If you use arrays, you need to sort them before the comparison and the time complexity of sorting algorithms is at least O(n * log(n)).

If the o and n arrays cannot contain the same value more than once, maybe the use of objects (associative arrays) instead of arrays is a better choice.

Example:

function diff(o, n) { 
    var a = {}; var r = {}; 

    for (var i in o) {
        if (!(i in n)) {
            r[i] = 1;
        }
    }
    for (var i in n) {
        if (!(i in o)) {
            a[i] = 1;
        }
    }
    return {added: a, removed: r};
}

    // how to use
var o = {"a":1, "b":1, "ab":1};
var n = {"a":1, "aa":1};

var diffon = diff (o, n);

    // display the results
var added = "", removed = "";
for (var i in diffon.added) {
    added += i + ", ";
}
for (var i in diffon.removed) {
    removed += i + ", ";
}

alert ("added: " + added);
alert ("removed: " + removed);

The time complexity in that case is O(n).

If you need further details about arrays, associative arrays in JavaScript, I suggest you the following link: Array object

share|improve this answer
    
so to drop your solution in what I have, I need to convert my input and output objects into object literal syntax? Unless there's some very cheap way of doing that, I think I'd rather stick with arrays. Is there cheap way to convert between them? –  Ian Grainger Aug 13 '10 at 13:48
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// I prefer to not sort the arrays

Array.prototype.diff= function(ar){
    var a= [], i= 0, L= this.length,
    ar= ar.concat(), t1, t2;
    while(i<L){
        t1= this[i++];
        t2= ar.indexOf(t1);
        if(t2!= -1){
            ar.splice(t2, 1);
        }
        else a.push(t1);
    }
    return a;
}

Array.prototype.compare= function(a2){
    return{
        r: this.diff(a2), a: a2.diff(this)
    }
}

/* 
test

var a1= [-1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5], a2= [0, 2, 4, 3, 5, 6, 8];
var o= a1.compare(a2);

alert('added: '+o.a+'\nremoved: '+o.r);


returned:

added: 0, 6, 8
removed: -1, 3

*/


// oldbrowser code:

if(![].indexOf){
    Array.prototype.indexOf= function(what, i){
        i= i || 0;
        var L= this.length;
        while(i< L){
            if(this[i]=== what) return i;
            ++i;
        }
        return -1;
    }
}

// Return common values instead of differences
Array.prototype.incommon= function(ar){
    var a= [], i= 0, L= this.length, a2= ar.concat(), t1, t2;
    while(i<L && a2.length){
        t1= this[i++];
        t2= a2.indexOf(t1);
        if(t2 != -1){
            a.push(a2.splice(t2, 1));
        }
    }
    return a;
}
share|improve this answer
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I use this function:

function diffArray(from, to){
    /*
    result will hold the transformations (in order) that need to 
    be done to make the from array equal to the to array
    */
    var result = [];
    var fromValue, fromIndex, fromCount, fromOffset;
    var toValue, toIndex, toCount, toMap;

    /*
    Buld an index for the two arrays to speed up the process. Do
    note that due to this optimization all values in the array will
    be transformed to strings. So the number 1 will be equal to the
    string '1'. Also all objects will converted to strings (via
    toString) and therefore probably considered equal.
    */
    toMap = to.reduce(function(result, value, index){
        if(value in result) result[value].push(index);
        else result[value] = [index];
        return result;
    }, {});
    toIndex = 0;
    toCount = to.length;

    fromOffset = 0;
    fromIndex = 0;
    fromCount = from.length;

    /*
    loop until we reach the end of one of the two arrays
    */
    while(fromIndex < fromCount && toIndex < toCount){
        fromValue = from[fromIndex];
        toValue = to[toIndex];

        /*
        when the two values are equal, no transformation is required.
        */
        if(fromValue === toValue){
            fromIndex++;
            toIndex++;
        }
        else{
            /*
            if fromValue is not in the remainder of the to array
            */
            // if(~to.indexOf(fromValue, toIndex)){ 
            if(
                fromValue in toMap
                && toMap[fromValue].some(function(value){
                    return toIndex <= value;
                })
            ){
                result.push({
                    type: 'insert'
                    , index: fromIndex + fromOffset
                    , value: toValue
                });
                toIndex++
                fromOffset++;
            }
            else{
                result.push({
                    type: 'delete'
                    , index: toIndex
                    , value: fromValue
                });
                fromIndex++
                fromOffset--;
            }

        }

    }

    return result
    /*
    add the remainder of the from array to the result as deletions
    */
    .concat(
        from
        .slice(fromIndex)
        .map(function(value, index){
            var result = {
                type: 'delete'
                , index: index + fromIndex + fromOffset
                , value: value
            };
            fromOffset--;
            return result;
        })
    )
    /*
    add the remainder of the to array to the result as insertions
    */
    .concat(
        to
        .slice(toIndex)
        .map(function(value, index){
            var result = {
                type: 'insert'
                , index: index + toIndex
                , value: value
            };
            fromOffset++;
            return result;
        })
    )
    ;

}//diffArray

Check out the repository for updates and unit tests: https://github.com/elmerbulthuis/diff-array

share|improve this answer
    
That reads pretty similar overall, right? I guess creating that index is faster than sorting - and removes duplicates? So you'll use a tiny bit more memory for more speed? –  Ian Grainger Mar 11 '13 at 11:14
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