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I have a Page with a UserControl on it. If the user presses Esc while anywhere on Page I want to handle.

I thought this would be as easy as hooking up the PreviewKeyDown event, testing for the Esc key, and then handling it. However, when I placed I breakpoint in the event handler I found it was never getting called. I thought perhaps the UserControl might be getting hit, so I tried PreviewKeyDown there... same result.

Does anyone know the proper place to test for a KeyDown or PreviewKeyDown on a Page object?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I believe that the PreviewKeyDown event is a tunneling routed event, rather than a bubbling one. If that is the case, then if your Page isn't getting the event, the UserControl shouldn't be either since it is below the Page in the visual tree. Maybe try handling it at the top level of your app (Window perhaps?) and see if it is getting the event?

Another option that might help would be to use something like Snoop in CodePlex to figure out where the events are going.

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I have/had the same problem. I have a window which hosts a Frame which loads/navigates to various Page's which at their turn contain just 1 UserControl which contains normal Controls/Elements (Labels, Hyperlinks, etc).

what I discovered (after some hours of frustration of course!!!) is that if you do NOT have the focus on one of the Controls/Elements mentioned above the PreviewKeyDown event does NOT fire on the UserControl (stops somewhere at Frame level) but as soon as you put the focus (for instance calling ctrl.Focus() inside the UserCotrol's Loaded event handler) on one of the controls magic happens, it works, the event fires also for the UserControl.

of course thinking of it afterwards this makes enough sense but I am 100% sure this will cacth at least 5 out of 10 people by surprise :) crazy little thing called WPF...

cheers!

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Argh! This actually works. WPF is a little crazy! –  Vince Dec 22 '10 at 16:59
1  
Don't forget to set the focusable property on your loaded page/control when you try to focus it. –  Akku Jan 25 '12 at 16:06

Attach to the Window's Event

After the control is loaded, attach to the Window's KeyDown event (or any event) by using Window.GetWindow(this), like so:

The XAML

<UserControl Loaded="UserControl_Loaded">
</UserControl>

The Code Behind

private void UserControl_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {
  var window = Window.GetWindow(this);
  window.KeyDown += HandleKeyPress;
}

private void HandleKeyPress(object sender, KeyEventArgs e) {
  //Do work
}
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2  
I need to double-check this, but the paranoid part of my brain says you should unbind the event when the control is unloaded. Else you'll retain a link from your UserControl to the Window object its hosting and they'll never be freed (memory-wise). –  jklemmack Jan 29 at 6:54

Setting the Focusable property to true on my UserControl solved the issue for me.

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What exactly worked for me:

Only on window Loaded event listen to PreviewKeyDown event:

void GameScreen_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
     this.PreviewKeyDown += GameScreen_PreviewKeyDown;
     this.Focusable = true;
     this.Focus();
}

void GameScreen_PreviewKeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
     MessageBox.Show("it works!");   
}
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I propose a method which strengthens the one @Doc mentioned.

The following code @Doc mentioned will work since the KeyDown routed event is bubbled to the outermost Window. Once Window receives the KeyDown event bubbled from an inner element, Window triggers any KeyDown event-handler registered to it, like this HandleKeyPress.

private void UserControl_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {
  var window = Window.GetWindow(this);
  window.KeyDown += HandleKeyPress;
}

private void HandleKeyPress(object sender, KeyEventArgs e) {
  //Do work
}

But this += is risky, a programmer is more likely to forget to un-register the event-handler. Then memory leaking or some bugs will happen.

Here I suggest,

YourWindow.xaml.cs

protected override void OnKeyDown(KeyEventArgs e)
{
    base.OnKeyDown(e);

    // You need to have a reference to YourUserControlViewModel in the class.
    YourUserControlViewModel.CallKeyDown(e);

    // Or, if you don't like ViewModel, hold your user-control in the class then
    YourUserControl.CallKeyDown(e);
}

YourUserControlViewModel.cs or YourUserControl.xaml.cs

public void CallKeyDown(KeyEventArgs e) {
  //Do your work
}

There is no need to code in xaml.

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I would be grateful if someone likes and upvotes my answer since the post isn't in a up-to-date subject and not easy to gain upvote. –  Jeff T. Sep 16 at 4:14

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