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My friends tell me that a special loop exists that isn't a 'while' loop or a 'do while' loop.

Does anyone know what it's called and the correct syntax for it's use?

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4  
You should consider getting a good, introductory book on C, like one of those listed in The Definitive C Book Guide and List. –  James McNellis Aug 13 '10 at 13:36
2  
Thanks James, I have a book on C but I read the first chapter and got bored. –  user91510 Aug 13 '10 at 13:38
8  
@Hades if you got bored in the 1st chapter of a C book, what are you doing here? –  Brian Postow Aug 13 '10 at 13:53
11  
Yeah, we can tell, you got bored. How come do you know about safety of exceptions thrown form DLLs and don't know loops in C? –  Maciej Hehl Aug 13 '10 at 13:53
3  
-1 I can't in good conscience vote to close this, since it really is a programming question, but per @Maciej's comment, it is a waste of time. –  Ben Zotto Aug 13 '10 at 18:25

11 Answers 11

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A setjmp loop perhaps? That is pretty special.

static jmp_buf buf;

int i = 0;
if ( setjmp(buf) < end ) {
    /* do stuff */
    longjmp(buf, i++);
} 
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Evil. BTW, why is the jmp_buf declared static? –  R.. Aug 13 '10 at 15:55
    
Global variables declared static are not visible in other compilation units. I think it defaults to "int" that way. –  Axel Gneiting Aug 13 '10 at 18:20
    
To limit its scope to the current translation unit scope? Otherwise an ingenious programmer might define extern jmp_buf buf in another file, and jump to the above loop from there. Now this would be evil... –  Schedler Aug 13 '10 at 18:27
    
I meant as opposed to automatic... –  R.. Aug 13 '10 at 19:06

A for loop maybe?

for (i = 0; i < 15; ++i) {
  /* do stuff */
}
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If you used 42 instead of 15, your loop would be the answer to life, this question, the universe and everything. –  Tim Post Aug 13 '10 at 14:50
7  
No, it would stop one step before reaching the answer. –  tdammers Aug 13 '10 at 14:54
    
Why is 42 such a crucial number? :) +1 for for-loop though. That made me chuckle. –  user201788 Aug 13 '10 at 17:54
    
@AJ google calculator can help show why: google.com/… –  cobbal Aug 13 '10 at 22:53

A goto loop perhaps? That is pretty special.

start:
       /* do stuff */
       if ( !done ) goto start;
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13  
Special in an awful scary way. –  GWW Aug 13 '10 at 13:41
2  
@GWW sorry I can't upvote your comment more than once! –  Brian Postow Aug 13 '10 at 13:53
2  
+1 Yeah, The goto loop is pretty special. I can't really consider the for loop special, so this must be the correct answer. :P –  Erik B Aug 13 '10 at 14:23
1  
Special, I think, as in "special education" in the US. –  David Thornley Aug 13 '10 at 14:41
    
I was going to offer the "goto loop" but you beat me to it.. –  R.. Aug 13 '10 at 15:56

There are 3 kind of loops in c.

The for loop: http://cprogramminglanguage.net/c-for-loop-statement.aspx

for (initialization_expression;loop_condition;increment_expression){
  // statements
}

The while loop: http://cprogramminglanguage.net/c-while-loop-statement.aspx

while (expression) {
  // statements
}

The do while loop: http://cprogramminglanguage.net/c-do-while-loop-statement.aspx

do {
  // statements
} while (expression);

And you can emulate loops with a function ofcourse:

Emulating a do while loop:

void loop(int repetitions){
    // statements
    if(repetitions != 0){
        loop(repetitions - 1);
    }
}

Emulating a while loop:

void loop(int repetitions){
    if(repetitions != 0){
        // statements
        loop(repetitions - 1);
    }
}
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+1 for recursion! :) –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Aug 13 '10 at 13:50

A signal handler loop perhaps? That is pretty special.

#include <signal.h>

void loop(int signal)
{
    if ( !done ) {
        /* do stuff */
        raise(SIGINT);
    }
}

int main() {
    signal(SIGINT, loop);
    raise(SIGINT);
    return 0;
}
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3  
You're the king of special loops! –  D.H. Aug 13 '10 at 14:14
2  
Well, I am very good at knowing what NOT to do in production code. –  Christoffer Aug 13 '10 at 14:16
1  
Yeah, that's special alright. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Aug 13 '10 at 15:17
    
Depending on your system's signal semantics, this could simply exit (default SIGINT behavior) after the first round. –  R.. Aug 13 '10 at 15:54

There's the for loop, although I don't know how special I'd consider it.

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1  
A for loop could be considered a special case of a while loop. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Aug 13 '10 at 13:37
    
I would say that it most certainly is a fancy while loop. –  Ben313 Aug 13 '10 at 14:38
1  
...And a while loop is nothing more than a dressed up set pair of jump/goto and conditional statements. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Aug 13 '10 at 14:52
    
However, the fact that in C (and C++) is nothing than syntactic sugar for a while loop may be misleading. This is not the situation in some other languages, where the semantics of while and for loops are clearly different: the iteration count a while loop may be unknown before the loop is entered. Not so for a for loop, where the iteration count is known before entering the loop, and changing the loop counter is not allowed from within the loop. –  Schedler Aug 13 '10 at 18:24

and don't forget recursion

void doSomething(int i)
{
    if(i > 15)
        return;
    /* do stuff */
    doSomething(i + 1);
}
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you left out a for(;true;) loop

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My answer here could help you understand how C for loop works

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infinite loop ?

for(;;){ }

I like this one :-)

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A Y combinator loop? That's special enough to be apple only (for now). Also special enough to leak memory all over the place

#include <stdio.h>
#include <Block.h>

typedef void * block;
typedef block (^block_fn)(block);
typedef void (^int_fn)(int);

int main(int argc, char ** argv) {
    block_fn Y = ^ block(block f) {
        return ((block_fn) ^ block(block_fn x) {
                return x(x);
            })(^ block(block_fn x) {
                    return ((block_fn)f)(Block_copy(^ block(block y) {
                                return ((block_fn)(x(x)))(y);
                            }));
                });
    };

    int_fn loop = Y(^ block(int_fn f) {
            return Block_copy(^ (int a) {
                    if (a <= 0) {
                        printf("loop done\n");
                    } else {
                        printf("loop %d\n", a);
                        f(a - 1);
                    }
                });
        });
    loop(10);

    return 0;
}
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I don't know if the use of blocks count though... –  KennyTM Aug 13 '10 at 18:06
    
-1 for some non-C language in the answer to a question tagged C –  R.. Aug 13 '10 at 19:08
    
@R this is C as interpreted by Apple's versions of gcc or clang: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blocks_(C_language_extension%29 –  cobbal Aug 13 '10 at 22:33
    
I will, however, accept -1 for posting such a useless and hideous answer. It is C though –  cobbal Aug 13 '10 at 23:01

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