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When do we need to go for Adapter pattern? If possible give me a real world example that suits that pattern...

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Are you planning on going through the entire GoF book and asking when you need X pattern? –  Thomas Owens Aug 13 '10 at 15:16
    
As long as it gives him all those upvotes, if I was him I would ask about each and every design pattern :-P –  Federico Culloca Aug 13 '10 at 15:17
    
@Thomas Owens: All i seek is a good real world example that will help me to learn about that pattern. –  brainless Aug 13 '10 at 15:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I worked on a system which needed to interface with external DVRs. For the most part, all DVRs have the same basic functionality: start recording from a certain video source; stop recording; start playback from a certain time; stop playback, etc.

Every DVR manufacturer provided a software library, allowing us to write code to control their device (for sake of this discussion, I'll refer to it as the SDK). Even though every SDK provided APIs for all the basic functionality, none of them were quite the same. Here's a very rough example, but you get the idea:

  • BeginPlayback(DateTime startTime);
  • StartPlayback(long startTimeTicks);
  • Playback(string startDate, string startTime);

Our software needed to be able to interact with all DVRs. So instead of writing horrible switch/cases for each different SDK, we created our own common IDVRController interface, and wrote all of our system code to that interface:

  • Playback(DateTime startTime);

We then wrote a different adapter implementation for each SDK, all of which implemented our IDVRController interface. We used a config file to specify the type of DVR the system would connect to, and a Factory pattern to instantiate the correct implementer of IDVRController for that DVR.

In that way, the adapter pattern made our system code simpler: we always coded to IDVRController. And it allowed us to roll out adapters for new SDKs post-deployment (our Factory used reflection to instantiate the correct IDVRController instance).

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Excellent real life example. It helped me to understand the real purpose of this pattern. I have seen that this pattern is mostly used along with Service Locater or Factory pattern. –  NoobDeveloper Jun 19 '13 at 6:37

In computer programming, the adapter pattern (often referred to as the wrapper pattern or simply a wrapper) is a design pattern that translates one interface for a class into a compatible interface. An adapter allows classes to work together that normally could not because of incompatible interfaces, by providing its interface to clients while using the original interface. The adapter translates calls to its interface into calls to the original interface, and the amount of code necessary to do this is typically small. The adapter is also responsible for transforming data into appropriate forms. For instance, if multiple boolean values are stored as a single integer but your consumer requires a 'true'/'false', the adapter would be responsible for extracting the appropriate values from the integer value.

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Wikipedia!!!

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Existing Interface

interface Shape {
    public int calculateArea(int r);
}

Current Implementation for Shape interface

class Square implements Shape {
    @Override
    public int calculateArea(int r) {
        return r * r;
    }
}

Now Consider that you want Circle class to adapt to our existing interface which in no way we can modify (Written by third party).

class Circle {
    public double calculateCircularArea (int r) {
        return 3.14 * r * r;
    }
}

Now we have adapt Circle implementation to our Shape interface. So we need an adaptor as they are incompatible.

class CirCleAdaptor extends Circle implements Shape {
    @Override
    public int calculateArea(int r) {
        return (int) calculateCircularArea(r);
    }
}

CircleAdaptor - Is the Adaptor for Circle
Circle - Is the Adaptee
Shape - Is the Target Interface

public class AdapterPattern {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Shape circle = new CirCleAdaptor();
        System.out.println("Circle Area " + circle.calculateArea(5));
        Shape square = new Square();
        System.out.println("Square Area " + square.calculateArea(5));
    }
}

Hope this gives a better idea about When to use it.

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Adapter pattern is required in following scenario:

Say you have defined an interface I1 with method M1 and M2

C1 and C2 implements this interface I1, now for C1 while implementing M1 and M2 you have found no help from other existing classes so you need to write all logic by yourself.

Now while implementing class C2 you have come across class C3 with methods M3 and M4 that can be used to implement M1 and M2 for C2 so to utilize those M3 and M4 in class C2 you extends class C3 and use M3 and M4 of C3.

In this example C2 becomes Adapter class and C3 becomes adaptee

package com.design.patterns;

public class AdapterExample {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Shape line = new LineShape();
        line.draw();

        Shape text = new TextShape();
        text.draw();
    }
}

//==Start from here
interface Shape{
    public void draw();
}

class LineShape implements Shape{
    @Override
    public void draw() {
        System.out.println("write some logic and draw line");
    }   
}

//Adapter
class TextShape extends TextView implements Shape{
    @Override
    public void draw() {
        System.out.println("logic is already there in class TextView");
        drawText();
    }   
}

// Adaptee
class TextView{
    public void drawText() {
        System.out.println("Drawing Text Shape");
    }
}
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