Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
id  login_name login_time
1    aa        2002-09-19
2    bb        2002-12-19
3    bb        2002-12-30

How do I write one SQL statement to find out the latest login_time for the user who has the maximum number of logins. For example, in this sample data, user "bb" has logged in twice and his latest login_time is '2002-12-30'.

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by 'maximum login times'? –  BoltClock Aug 13 '10 at 16:23
2  
What SQL variant? Answers will differ for mysql, t-sql, etc –  Ian Henry Aug 13 '10 at 16:23
    
Maximum number of logins perhaps? –  Kris C Aug 13 '10 at 16:23
1  
How do you want to deal with ties, say if user "aa" had another record for instance... –  OMG Ponies Aug 13 '10 at 16:24
1  
Homework, if not dependant on specific database? –  Mark Bannister Aug 13 '10 at 17:19

5 Answers 5


SELECT

id,
MAX(`login_time`) AS `login_time`

FROM table_name

GROUP BY login_name

Is this what you want ?? can you explain a bit more if not ..

share|improve this answer
    
this answer is wrong. I've tested, sorry. –  SunLiWei Aug 13 '10 at 17:03

Here's the easy way:

SELECT
    t.login_name
    ,COUNT(t.id) AS login_counts
    ,MAX(t.login_time) AS latest_login_time
FROM this_table AS t
GROUP BY t.login_name
ORDER BY login_counts DESC, login_name
;

The top line gives you the login_name with the most logins.

And here's the hard way:

SELECT
   t.login_name
   ,MAX(t.login_time) AS latest_login_time
FROM this_table AS t
INNER JOIN (
   -- Determine who has the most logins
   SELECT TOP 1 x.login_name, COUNT(x.id) AS login_count
   FROM this_table AS x
   GROUP BY x.login_name
   ORDER BY login_count DESC  -- to get the highest counts first
) AS m
   ON t.login_name = m.login_name
GROUP BY t.login_name
;

That gets you one name and date, and that's it, though it doesn't take into account the possibility that there could be more than 1 name with the maximum number of logins. I'll leave that up to you to figure out.

share|improve this answer
SELECT login_name, COUNT(*) as num_logins, max(login_time) as last_login_time
FROM table_name ORDER BY num_logins DESC 

Then, depends on sql server you are using, you can add limit 1 (in case of mysql), or top 1 for MS SQL Server, or something else for a different server to get the first record only.

share|improve this answer
    
this answer is wrong , sorry. –  SunLiWei Aug 13 '10 at 17:09
2  
Perhaps you should expand on what is wrong about it so that the poster and others might have a better idea of what you're looking to get. –  Tom H. Aug 13 '10 at 17:20
1  
@alex07 - I think that you want a GROUP BY login_name in there. –  Tom H. Aug 13 '10 at 17:21

The following works on an Oracle database:

SELECT MAX(LOGIN_TIME)
  FROM LOGIN_TABLE
  WHERE LOGIN_NAME = (SELECT LOGIN_NAME
                        FROM (SELECT LOGIN_NAME, COUNT(*) AS LOGIN_COUNT
                                FROM LOGIN_TABLE
                                GROUP BY LOGIN_NAME
                                ORDER BY LOGIN_COUNT DESC)
                        WHERE ROWNUM = 1)

Share and enjoy.

share|improve this answer
select * 
from [login table] 
where login_name [has max] on login_time [is soonest]
share|improve this answer
1  
This is not a valid SQL statement, this is just pseudo-code –  OMG Ponies Aug 13 '10 at 16:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.