Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i've been trying multiple functions including 2D ones to try to get this somewhat working, but no luck yet...

I have 2 line segments of latlng endpoints on earth, and i want to know if and where the 2 lines intersect.

I'm currently working with this which a physics major says should be doing the job for a 2d plane but its not. it always returns true for intersect

[code]function intersectPoint($line1start, $line1end, $line2start, $line2end) //($p0_x, $p0_y, $p1_x, $p1_y, $p2_x, $p2_y, $p3_x, $p3_y) { $p0_x = $line1start['lat']; $p0_y = $line1start['lng']; $p1_x = $line1end['lat']; $p1_y = $line1end['lng']; $p2_x = $line2start['lat']; $p2_y = $line2start['lng']; $p3_x = $line1end['lat']; $p3_y = $line1end['lng'];

$s1_x = (double) $p1_x - (double) $p0_x;
$s1_y = (double) $p1_y - (double) $p0_y;

// s1_x = p1_x - p0_x; // s1_y = p1_y - p0_y; $s2_x = (double) $p3_x - (double) $p2_x; $s2_y = (double) $p3_y - (double) $p2_y; $s3_x = (double) $p0_x - (double) $p2_x; $s3_y = (double) $p0_y - (double) $p2_y; // s2_x = p3_x - p2_x; // s2_y = p3_y - p2_y;

$s = (double) ((double)(-$s1_y * $s3_x + $s1_x * $s3_y) / (double) (-$s2_x * $s1_y + $s1_x * $s2_y));
$t = (double) ((double)( $s2_x * $s3_y - $s2_y * $s3_x) / (double) (-$s2_x * $s1_y + $s1_x * $s2_y));

// s = (-s1_y * (p0_x - p2_x) + s1_x * (p0_y - p2_y)) / (-s2_x * s1_y + s1_x * s2_y); // t = ( s2_x * (p0_y - p2_y) - s2_y * (p0_x - p2_x)) / (-s2_x * s1_y + s1_x * s2_y);

if ($s >= 0 && $s <= 1 && $t >= 0 && $t <= 1)
{
    AppCommUtility::echof(" FUNC RETURNED TRUE $s >= 0 && $s <= 1 && $t >= 0 && $t <= 1");
    // Collision detected
    return array(
        'lat' => $p0_x + ($t * $s1_x),
        'lng' => $p0_y + ($t * $s1_y)
    );
}

return null; // No collision

}[/code]

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Assumption: your line segments are great circle arcs.

Any pair of distinct great circles intersects exactly twice. So, you can:

  1. Find the two points of intersection.
  2. See if the intersection points lie in your arcs.

Here is a discussion of this method.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.