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I am trying to print print out an array of integers whose length i dont know in C++. Here is my attempt.

    int i = 0;
    while ( X != NULL){
            cout << *(X+i) << " ";
            i+=1;
    }

X is the array. My problem is to stop upon printing last element.

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9  
If this is c++, you should be using a vector. –  James Aug 13 '10 at 18:27
1  
James, that should be an answer. (It should be the answer.) –  Daniel Earwicker Aug 13 '10 at 18:38
    
@Daniel, changed my answer to reflect that. –  James Aug 13 '10 at 18:41
1  
while ( X != NULL) will never terminate because you do not change X inside the loop. So obviously, your "solution" cannot work. –  FredOverflow Aug 13 '10 at 18:48
1  
@FredOverflow - Unless, of course, X starts out equal to NULL. In that case, the loop will never start. –  bta Aug 13 '10 at 19:56

7 Answers 7

Either the last element in your array will have to be some magic value (0 or -1 or INT_MAX or something similar) that you can watch for and thus use it to stop looping. Or else you must find a way to record the length of the array.

There is no standard way in C++ to determine the length of an arbitrary array.

The other alternative is to stop using raw arrays and use a smarter object such as std::vector which gives you array-like access but also keeps track of the number of elements stored in it.

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3  
Or std::/boost::array. –  GManNickG Aug 13 '10 at 18:41
int i = 0; 
while ( *(X+i) != NULL){ 
        cout << *(X+i) << " "; 
        i+=1; 
} 

Assuming your array is null-terminated.
However it would be much much better if you kept track of the length of your array, or even better use a vector.

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1  
It's an array of integers, so it's a fair bet that it's not null-terminated. Nevertheless, there might be a magic number he could use to terminate the array. –  Peter Ruderman Aug 13 '10 at 18:32
3  
Using NULL when you mean zero doesn't help readability. –  Mike Seymour Aug 13 '10 at 18:34
    
@Peter Ruderman, that may also be the problem. It seems to be a classic moving from c to c++ mistake. –  James Aug 13 '10 at 18:35
    
Using special characters is dangerous in terms of maintenance (you know it now but there is implied knowledge that must be handed down to the next generation of maintainers (some of whom own axes). –  Loki Astari Aug 13 '10 at 18:38
    
+1 for vector! From the OP's perspective, it's like an array with a size() method. –  Daniel Earwicker Aug 13 '10 at 19:33

You could find out the size of the array if X is an array and not a pointer:

int X[unknownsize];

size_t arraysize = sizeof(X)/sizeof(int);

for(int i=0;i<arraysize;i++)
{
  cout << X[i] << " ";
}
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This can be dangerous. If the code is re factored in-to a function (a likely scenario for such a small useful reusable piece of code) it will likely stop working. –  Loki Astari Aug 13 '10 at 18:40
    
True, but it answers the question Vaolter asked. –  user122302 Aug 13 '10 at 18:45
    
void printX(int array[]) { int size_array = sizeof(array)/sizeof(int); for (int i = 0; i < size_array; i++) cout << array[i] << endl; } I have put it as a function but i try it it give zero. –  Vaolter Aug 13 '10 at 19:04
    
as Martin said, once you make it a standalone function, you are working with a pointer, not an array. My answer applies to arrays as your question stated. If all you have is a pointer, you will have to try some of the other suggestions. –  user122302 Aug 13 '10 at 20:16

The loop you've written never modifies X, so assuming it's a valid array the loop will loop forever (or until it crashes by running some amount off the end).

The C++ way to solve this is to not use arrays but to use std::vector instead. It keeps track of all the bookkeeping including length for you automatically.

If X is an actual array (like int X[5];) you can use (sizeof(X) / sizeof(X[0])) to get the number of elements in the array. If X is passed as a pointer then there is no way in C or C++ to get the length. You must pass the length along with the array in that case.

You could play games with "magic" numbers in the array that mean end (for example if it must always be positive you could use -1 to signal the end, but that's just asking for obscure bugs. Use std::vector.

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First you need to find the size of the array and iterate until the size of the array to output the array elements as below,

size_t size = sizeof(X)/sizeof(X[0]);

for (size_t i=0; i<size; i++)
{
    cout << X[i] << " ";
}
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1  
Why bother with the cast? Fix the types used instead, i.e. make your loop index variable a size_t to match the type of your size value. –  Void Aug 13 '10 at 20:54
    
Thanks Void. updated. –  Prabhu Jayaraman Aug 13 '10 at 21:12

If you declared the array there's an old C trick to get it's size:

int  array[10];

for ( int i = 0; i < sizeof(array) / sizeof(array[0]); i++ )
  printf( "%d", array[i] );
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You have a few options:

  1. Use vector which keeps track of the number of elements in your array.
  2. Have a length variable and manually keep track of size.
  3. Mark the last element of your array with a null pointer i.e. '\n'

(2)

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