Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to implement generic method to put in a class a calculated value as a read-only memver value.

I've successfuly acomplished it using the following macro:

#define READONLY_PROPERTY(datatype, containerclass, access, name)\
    class name ## _ ## datatype ## _ROP {\
public:\
    name ## _ ## datatype ## _ROP(containerclass &c_): cclass(c_) {}\
        operator datatype() const {return cclass.access();}\
private:\
    containerclass &cclass;\
}name;\
friend class name ## _ ## datatype ## _ROP

that used in this class:

class TestClass {
public:
    TestClass(): x(0), y(0), pixels(*this) {}
    TestClass(int x_, int y_): x(x_), y(y_), pixels(*this) {}
    int x;
    int y;
    READONLY_PROPERTY(int, TestClass, getPix, pixels);
private:
    int getPix() {return x * y;}
};

generates the following working code (using g++):

class TestClass {
public:
    TestClass(): x(0), y(0), pixels(*this) {}
    TestClass(int x_, int y_): x(x_), y(y_), pixels(*this) {}
    int x;
    int y;
    class pixels_int_ROP {
    public:
        class pixels_int_ROP(TestClass &c_): cclass(C_) {}
        operator int() const {return cclass.getPix();}
    private:
        TestClass &cclass;
    } pixels;
    friend class pixels_int_ROP;
private:
    int getPix() {return x * y;}
};

The point is that I can then use the class this way:

TestClass tc(10,10);
std::cout << tc.pixels << std::endl;

Now I'm trying to do the same thing in a more C++ way using templates:

template<class T, class U, U (T::*F)()>;
class ReadOnlyProperty {
public:
    ReadOnlyProperty(T const& instance): _instance(instance) {}
    operator U const &() const {return _instance.*F();}
private:
    T& _instance;
};

class TestClass {
public:
    TestClass(): x(0), y(0), pixels(*this) {}
    TestClass(int x_, int y_): x(x_), y(y_), pixels(*this) {}
    int x;
    int y;
    ReadOnlyProperty<TestClass, int, &TestClass::getPix&> pixels;
private:
    int getPix() {return x * y;}
};

but the compiler says:

error: incomplete type ‘TestClass’ used in nested name specifier
error: template argument 3 is invalid

in the line where the template class is instantiated.

Could you, please, help me?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
4  
Why go through all that trouble if a simple member function does the job as well? int TestClass::pixels() const { return x*y; }, then std::cout << tc.pixels() << std::endl; and done. –  Georg Fritzsche Aug 13 '10 at 19:19
    
Because I'm just trying to learn some topics about C++ templates and I like the idiom that hides if an attribute is calculated or stored (in a class use point of view). This could be because I'm currently more a python programmer than a C++ one and I'm used to the pyhton property concept. –  Patxitron Aug 13 '10 at 19:52
    
In C++ properties are usually accessed through member functions (i.e. accessors), with some exceptions for the members of "small" structs that just carry data (e.g. struct Point { int x, y; };). –  Georg Fritzsche Aug 13 '10 at 20:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

because getPix() was not declared when it is used as a template parameter, and _instance have to be const because ReadOnlyProperty constructor parameter is const.

template< class T, class U, U (T::*F)() const >
class ReadOnlyProperty {
public:
    ReadOnlyProperty(T const& instance): _instance(instance) {}
    operator U const &() const {return (_instance.*F)();}
private:
    const T& _instance;
};

class TestClass {
public:
    TestClass(): x(0), y(0), pixels(*this) {}
    TestClass(int x_, int y_): x(x_), y(y_), pixels(*this) {}
    int x;
    int y;
private:
    int getPix() const {return x * y;}
public:
    ReadOnlyProperty<TestClass, int, &TestClass::getPix> pixels;
};

Edit: Thanks to Georg Fritzsche, According to his comment, the last template parameter should take a const member function and _instance.*F() needs parentheses :) (oh! i forgot them!)

share|improve this answer
1  
It should take a const member function, U (T::*F)() const, if its calling it on a const instance. It should also be (_instance.*F)() - the function call () has higher precedence than .*. –  Georg Fritzsche Aug 13 '10 at 19:29
    
@Georg Fritzsche: Yes, it should be const and i just had cleaned its errors :) thanks for your attention, i changed the last template parameter to take const member functions. –  ccSadegh Aug 13 '10 at 19:48
    
Thank you both. The answer and the comment have been resolved my question. –  Patxitron Aug 13 '10 at 19:54

How about this:

#include <functional>

template<class R, class UA, class P>
class MyBind
{
    public:
        MyBind(UA unaryAction, P param)
            :_unaryAction(unaryAction)
            ,_parameter(param)
        {}
        operator R const&() const
        {
            return _action(_parameter);
        }
    private:
        UA  _unaryAction;
        P&  _parameter;
};

Then it can be used like this:

class TestClass
{
        typedef std::const_mem_fun_t<int, TestClass> MethodCall;
        int getPix() const
        {
            return x * y;
        }
    public:
        TestClass(int x_, int y_)
            :x(x_)
            ,y(y_)
            ,pixels(std::mem_fun(&TestClass::getPix), *this)
        {}
        int     x;
        int     y;
        MyBind<int, MethodCall, TestClass>     pixels;
};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.