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I'm having a bit of a problem. I'm using FireFox 3.6 and have the following DOM structure:

<div class="view-row">
    <div class="view-type">Type</div>
    <div class="view-name">Name</div>                
</div>

And the following CSS:

.view-row {
width:100%;
display:table-row;
}

.view-name {
display: table-cell;
float:right;
}

.view-type {
display: table-cell;
}

If I take off the display:table-row it will appear correctly, with the view-row showing a width of 100%. If I put it back it shrinks down. I've put this up on JS Bin:

http://jsbin.com/ifiyo

What's going on?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 39 down vote accepted

If you're using display:table-row etc., then you need proper markup, which includes a containing table. Without it your original question basically provides the equivalent bad markup of:

<tr style="width:100%">
    <td>Type</td>
    <td style="float:right">Name</td>
</tr>

Where's the table in the above? You can't just have a row out of nowhere (tr must be contained in either table, thead, tbody, etc.)

Instead, add an outer element with display:table, put the 100% width on the containing element. The two inside cells will automatically go 50/50 and align the text right on the second cell. Forget floats with table elements. It'll cause so many headaches.

markup:

<div class="view-table">
    <div class="view-row">
        <div class="view-type">Type</div>
        <div class="view-name">Name</div>                
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

.view-table
{
    display:table;
    width:100%;
}
.view-row,
{
    display:table-row;
}
.view-row > div
{
    display: table-cell;
}
.view-name 
{
    text-align:right;
}
share|improve this answer
8  
+5 on getting rid of the damn floats! –  chum of chance Aug 13 '10 at 20:11
    
Looks to me like you could get way with omitting the display: table-row; if the markup only really has one row; the display: table-cell; seems to infer a containing row. If, however, you want the appearance of another or multiple rows, then you do need the display: table-row;: jsbin.com/ifiyo/9 –  DanDan Jan 7 '12 at 15:39
16  
-1 because the explanation is just wrong. According to the CSS2.1 specs, the markup/CSS in question is supposed to work. –  Pumbaa80 Feb 8 '12 at 7:39
6  
No browser has any issues with the missing table (Firefox 3.0 had...) The actual problem is that width settings on table rows are entirely ignored. (which means the markup/CSS in question does in fact not work as expected, so my comment above was wrong ;)) –  Pumbaa80 Feb 9 '12 at 10:39
1  
This answer is incorrect. The asker's markup is correct. As Pumbaa80 says, the issue is with assuming that the width has to be at row level instead of table level. Width is only interpreted at table level. Rows can be completely omitted. See my full answer below. –  Amin Ariana Aug 16 '12 at 23:55

Tested answer:

In the .view-row css, change:

display:table-row;

to:

display:table

and get rid of "float". Everything will work as expected.

As it has been suggested in the comments, there is no need for a wrapping table. CSS allows for omitting levels of the tree structure (in this case rows) that are implicit. The reason your code doesn't work is that "width" can only be interpreted at the table level, not at the table-row level. When you have a "table" and then "table-cell"s directly underneath, they're implicitly interpreted as sitting in a row.

Working example:

<div class="view">
    <div>Type</div>
    <div>Name</div>                
</div>

with css:

.view {
  width:100%;
  display:table;
}

.view > div {
  width:50%;
  display: table-cell;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer suggests the CSS equivalent of <table><td></td></table> which on its own would be invalid HTML markup as per W3C. While it will validate, why would you suggest telling the browser to mimic this markup? –  KP. Aug 22 '12 at 15:57
7  
This is correct by CSS rules: w3.org/TR/CSS2/tables.html#anonymous-boxes . It is easier to maintain by removing unnecessary lines of code (for example, the unnecessary <view-row> div suggested by KP.). This helped me... I'm using it. +1 –  BillR Sep 14 '12 at 20:11

Note that according to the CSS3 spec, you do NOT have to wrap your layout in a table-style element. The browser will infer the existence of containing elements if they do not exist.

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2  
The very same has been specified in CSS 2.1, section 17.2.1, top 3.2. The HBOX/VBOX example below is exactly the case in question. So looks like browsers just don't care. –  Pumbaa80 Feb 8 '12 at 7:44

give on .view-type class float:left; or delete the float:right; of .view-name

edit: Wrap your div <div class="view-row"> with another div for example <div class="table">

and set the following css :

.table {
    display:table;
    width:100%;}

You have to use the table structure for correct results.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried that, it did not work. –  chum of chance Aug 13 '10 at 19:43
    
I tested with ff3.6, ie 8,chrome,opera. you can see it here jsbin.com/ifiyo/4 they show them side by side –  Sotiris Aug 13 '10 at 19:52
    
I was looking to have name on the far right, type on the far left ... if you do a display:inline on both and take out the display:table-row it works, I was thinking there might be a better way to do it using the table-row/cell properties. –  chum of chance Aug 13 '10 at 19:54
    
I edit my answer. check it. –  Sotiris Aug 13 '10 at 20:18

You can nest table-cell directly within table. You muslt have a table. Starting eith table-row does not work. Try it with this HTML:

<html>
  <head>
    <style type="text/css">
.table {
  display: table;
  width: 100%;
}
.tr {
  display: table-row;
  width: 100%;
}
.td {
  display: table-cell;
}
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>

    <div class="table">
      <div class="tr">
        <div class="td">
          X
        </div>
        <div class="td">
          X
        </div>
        <div class="td">
          X
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>

      <div class="tr">
        <div class="td">
          X
        </div>
        <div class="td">
          X
        </div>
        <div class="td">
          X
        </div>
      </div>

    <div class="table">
        <div class="td">
          X
        </div>
        <div class="td">
          X
        </div>
        <div class="td">
          X
        </div>
    </div>

  </body>
</html>
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