Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've started using StringBuilder in preference to straight concatenation, but it seems like it's missing a crucial method. So, I implemented it myself, as an extension:

public void Append(this StringBuilder stringBuilder, params string[] args)
{
    foreach (string arg in args)
        stringBuilder.Append(arg);
}

This turns the following mess:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
...
sb.Append(SettingNode);
sb.Append(KeyAttribute);
sb.Append(setting.Name);

Into this:

sb.Append(SettingNode, KeyAttribute, setting.Name);

I could use sb.AppendFormat("{0}{1}{2}",..., but this seems even less preferred, and still harder to read. Is my extension a good method, or does it somehow undermine the benefits of StringBuilder? I'm not trying to prematurely optimize anything, as my method is more about readability than speed, but I'd also like to know I'm not shooting myself in the foot.

share|improve this question
7  
Should point out that unless you already have a StringBuilder, straight string concat would be faster. e.g. string s = "orig" + SettingNode + KeyAttribute + setting.Name; –  hemp Aug 13 '10 at 21:33
    
@Hemp: Only slightly. It gets rid of the call to Append. Everything else should be the same. And thats assuming there aren't other appends. –  Devon_C_Miller Aug 13 '10 at 22:34
    
@Hemp: What about string s = string.Concat("orig", SettingNode, KeyAttribute, setting.Name), I think that'd be faster than using "+" for concat. –  Daniel Lo Nigro Aug 19 '10 at 3:34
    
@Daniel15: It probably would be faster if they weren't identical. The C# compiler optimizes string concats. See: bit.ly/94TRFG –  hemp Aug 19 '10 at 20:57

10 Answers 10

up vote 69 down vote accepted

I see no problem with your extension. If it works for you it's all good.

I myself prefere:

sb.Append(SettingNode)
  .Append(KeyAttribute)
  .Append(setting.Name);
share|improve this answer
24  
+1 Do it this way! If they wrote it to return this, then this is completely what the designers intended. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 13 '10 at 19:48
1  
fluid or fluent –  kenny Aug 13 '10 at 20:04
    
@kenny are you asking what that style is called? AFAIK, it's known as "fluent interfaces." –  Maxim Zaslavsky Aug 13 '10 at 23:54
    
I like the word fluid better!! please change ;) –  kenny Aug 14 '10 at 20:10
    

Questions like this can always be answered with a simple test case.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace SBTest
{
    class Program
    {
        private const int ITERATIONS = 1000000;

        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Test1();
            Test2();
            Test3();
        }

        private static void Test1()
        {
            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            var sb = new StringBuilder();

            for (var i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; i++)
            {
                sb.Append("TEST" + i.ToString("00000"),
                          "TEST" + (i + 1).ToString("00000"),
                          "TEST" + (i + 2).ToString("00000"));
            }

            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Testing Append() extension method...");
            Console.WriteLine("--------------------------------------------");
            Console.WriteLine("Test 1 iterations: {0:n0}", ITERATIONS);
            Console.WriteLine("Test 1 milliseconds: {0:n0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
            Console.WriteLine("Test 1 output length: {0:n0}", sb.Length);
            Console.WriteLine("");
        }

        private static void Test2()
        {
            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            var sb = new StringBuilder();

            for (var i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; i++)
            {
                sb.Append("TEST" + i.ToString("00000"));
                sb.Append("TEST" + (i+1).ToString("00000"));
                sb.Append("TEST" + (i+2).ToString("00000"));
            }

            sw.Stop();    
            Console.WriteLine("Testing multiple calls to Append() built-in method...");
            Console.WriteLine("--------------------------------------------");
            Console.WriteLine("Test 2 iterations: {0:n0}", ITERATIONS);
            Console.WriteLine("Test 2 milliseconds: {0:n0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
            Console.WriteLine("Test 2 output length: {0:n0}", sb.Length);
            Console.WriteLine("");
        }

        private static void Test3()
        {
            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            var sb = new StringBuilder();

            for (var i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; i++)
            {
                sb.AppendFormat("{0}{1}{2}",
                    "TEST" + i.ToString("00000"),
                    "TEST" + (i + 1).ToString("00000"),
                    "TEST" + (i + 2).ToString("00000"));
            }

            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Testing AppendFormat() built-in method...");
            Console.WriteLine("--------------------------------------------");            
            Console.WriteLine("Test 3 iterations: {0:n0}", ITERATIONS);
            Console.WriteLine("Test 3 milliseconds: {0:n0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
            Console.WriteLine("Test 3 output length: {0:n0}", sb.Length);
            Console.WriteLine("");
        }
    }

    public static class SBExtentions
    {
        public static void Append(this StringBuilder sb, params string[] args)
        {
            foreach (var arg in args)
                sb.Append(arg);
        }
    }
}

On my PC, the output is:

Testing Append() extension method...
--------------------------------------------
Test 1 iterations: 1,000,000
Test 1 milliseconds: 1,080
Test 1 output length: 29,700,006

Testing multiple calls to Append() built-in method...
--------------------------------------------
Test 2 iterations: 1,000,000
Test 2 milliseconds: 1,001
Test 2 output length: 29,700,006

Testing AppendFormat() built-in method...
--------------------------------------------
Test 3 iterations: 1,000,000
Test 3 milliseconds: 1,124
Test 3 output length: 29,700,006

So your extension method is only slightly slower than the Append() method and is slightly faster than the AppendFormat() method, but in all 3 cases, the difference is entirely too trivial to worry about. Thus, if your extension method enhances the readability of your code, use it!

share|improve this answer
2  
I feel like the three "TEST" + i.ToString("00000") per append would dwarf the time it takes to append it to a StringBuilder, and should probably be run with constant strings instead, just to get a better picture. –  dlras2 Aug 13 '10 at 20:05
    
Great test btw! –  KP. Aug 13 '10 at 20:05
    
Evidence - always good. –  ChrisF Aug 13 '10 at 20:05
    
+1 My previous comment was just being nitpicky - but yes, it's a good test! –  dlras2 Aug 13 '10 at 20:11
    
@Daniel, I was just creating dynamic strings to avoid any optimizations string interning might give. Not sure if it really affects the test, but I suppose one could run the test with constants to double check. :P –  Chris Aug 13 '10 at 20:42

It's a little bit of overhead creating the extra array, but I doubt that it's a lot. You should measure

If it turns out that the overhead of creating string arrays is significant, you can mitigate it by having several overloads - one for two parameters, one for three, one for four etc... so that only when you get to a higher number of parameters (e.g. six or seven) will it need to create the array. The overloads would be like this:

public void Append(this builder, string item1, string item2)
{
    builder.Append(item1);
    builder.Append(item2);
}

public void Append(this builder, string item1, string item2, string item3)
{
    builder.Append(item1);
    builder.Append(item2);
    builder.Append(item3);
}

public void Append(this builder, string item1, string item2,
                   string item3, string item4)
{
    builder.Append(item1);
    builder.Append(item2);
    builder.Append(item3);
    builder.Append(item4);
}

// etc

And then one final overload using params, e.g.

public void Append(this builder, string item1, string item2,
                   string item3, string item4, params string[] otherItems)
{
    builder.Append(item1);
    builder.Append(item2);
    builder.Append(item3);
    builder.Append(item4);
    foreach (string item in otherItems)
    {
        builder.Append(item);
    }
}

I'd certainly expect these (or just your original extension method) to be faster than using AppendFormat - which needs to parse the format string, after all.

Note that I didn't make these overloads call each other pseudo-recursively - I suspect they'd be inlined, but if they weren't the overhead of setting up a new stack frame etc could end up being significant. (We're assuming the overhead of the array is significant, if we've got this far.)

share|improve this answer
    
Visual Studio seems to want to use params string[] args instead of string arg0, string arg1, etc. Do I have to do string arg0, string arg1, ..., params string[] moreArgs to get this to work? –  dlras2 Aug 13 '10 at 20:10
    
@Jon No offense, but the multiple overloads looks heinous. At least make it a regression call for each extra overload, and why not just use params string[] args? –  Lucas B Aug 13 '10 at 20:13
3  
@Lucas: The point of using some overloads with multiple parameters is to avoid the overhead of the array which is created every time you use a method with a params parameter. Yes, it may well be overkill - but this is a performance question, hence the answer. (I stated at the start that it won't be much overhead.) As for making one call another - I guess that wouldn't hurt if it's being inlined... but otherwise it's an extra stack frame each time. –  Jon Skeet Aug 13 '10 at 20:16
    
@Daniel: Your comment isn't clear, but yes - you'd end up with one method call with various string parameters to start with, and one params string[] args at the end, which would only be used if you had a lot of parameters. But as I said in the start of my answer, I suspect there isn't much overhead anyway. I'll edit my answer to make that clearer. –  Jon Skeet Aug 13 '10 at 20:17
    
@Jon - Sorry for the unclear comment; it's hard to fit nice code in a comment like that. From the looks of your edit, you understood me perfectly, though. –  dlras2 Aug 13 '10 at 20:59

Other than a bit of overhead, I don't personally see any issues with it. Definitely more readable. As long as you're passing a reasonable number of params in I don't see the problem.

share|improve this answer

From a clarity perspective, your extension is ok.

It would probably be best to simply use the .append(x).append(y).append(z) format if you never have more than about 5 or 6 items.

StringBuilder itself would only net you a performance gain if you were processing many thousands of items. In addition you'll be creating the array every time you call the method.

So if you're doing it for clarity, that's ok. If you're doing it for efficiency, then you're probably on the wrong track.

share|improve this answer

I wouldn't say you're undermining it's efficiency, but you may be doing something inefficient when a more efficient method is available. AppendFormat is what I think you want here. If the {0}{1}{2} string being used constantly is too ugly, I tend to put my format strings in consts above, so the look would be more or less the same as your extension.

sb.AppendFormat(SETTING_FORMAT, var1, var2, var3);
share|improve this answer
1  
I don't know that AppendFormat is more efficient. Sure, it calls Append once, but under the hood it may be doing StringBuildinger.Append(String.Format(...)), which is instantiating an extra string. Of course it's conjecture either way until someone disassembles and sees what the IL actually looks like –  STW Aug 13 '10 at 19:46
    
@STW: To be sure I can't say as though I know, I would just think one string.format though is more efficient than three sb.Appends.. Don't know.. –  Jimmy Hoffa Aug 13 '10 at 19:48
    
I'd be inclined to go with AppendFormat, particularly if the string is being displayed to the user; if the string needs to be reformatted (e.g., for localization), you don't need to change your code. –  Eric Brown Aug 13 '10 at 20:06
    
Anything that uses format strings has to do some runtime parsing of the format string. There is no way this will be more efficient than multiple appends. –  bruceboughton Aug 16 '10 at 11:12

I haven't tested recently, but in the past, StringBuilder was actually slower than plain-vanilla string concatenation ("this " + "that") until you get to about 7 concatenations.

If this is string concatenation that is not happening in a loop, you may want to consider if you should be using the StringBuilder at all. (In a loop, I start to worry about allocations with plain-vanilla string concatenation, since strings are immutable.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for concatenation, good point! –  Lucas B Aug 18 '10 at 18:54

Potentially even faster, because it performs at most one reallocation/copy step, for many appends.

public void Append(this StringBuilder stringBuilder, params string[] args)
{
    int required = stringBuilder.Length;
    foreach (string arg in args)
        required += arg.Length;
    if (stringBuilder.Capacity < required)
        stringBuilder.Capacity = required;
    foreach (string arg in args)
        stringBuilder.Append(arg);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Neat, but some timings to prove it would be nice. –  Blorgbeard Aug 12 at 22:38

Ultimately it comes down to which one results in less string creation. I have a feeling that the extension will result in a higher string count that using the string format. But the performance probably won't be that different.

share|improve this answer

Chris,

Inspired by this Jon Skeet response (second answer), I slightly rewrote your code. Basically, I added the TestRunner method which runs the passed-in function and reports the elapsed time, eliminating a little redundant code. Not to be smug, but rather as a programming exercise for myself. I hope it's helpful.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace SBTest
{
  class Program
  {
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      // JIT everything
      AppendTest(1);
      AppendFormatTest(1);

      int iterations = 1000000;

      // Run Tests
      TestRunner(AppendTest, iterations);
      TestRunner(AppendFormatTest, iterations);

      Console.ReadLine();
    }

    private static void TestRunner(Func<int, long> action, int iterations)
    {
      GC.Collect();

      var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
      long length = action(iterations);
      sw.Stop();

      Console.WriteLine("--------------------- {0} -----------------------", action.Method.Name);
      Console.WriteLine("iterations: {0:n0}", iterations);
      Console.WriteLine("milliseconds: {0:n0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
      Console.WriteLine("output length: {0:n0}", length);
      Console.WriteLine("");
    }

    private static long AppendTest(int iterations)
    {
      var sb = new StringBuilder();

      for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
      {
        sb.Append("TEST" + i.ToString("00000"),
                  "TEST" + (i + 1).ToString("00000"),
                  "TEST" + (i + 2).ToString("00000"));
      }

      return sb.Length;
    }

    private static long AppendFormatTest(int iterations)
    {
      var sb = new StringBuilder();

      for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
      {
        sb.AppendFormat("{0}{1}{2}",
            "TEST" + i.ToString("00000"),
            "TEST" + (i + 1).ToString("00000"),
            "TEST" + (i + 2).ToString("00000"));
      }

      return sb.Length;
    }
  }

  public static class SBExtentions
  {
    public static void Append(this StringBuilder sb, params string[] args)
    {
      foreach (var arg in args)
        sb.Append(arg);
    }
  }
}

Here's the output:

--------------------- AppendTest -----------------------
iterations: 1,000,000
milliseconds: 1,274
output length: 29,700,006

--------------------- AppendFormatTest -----------------------
iterations: 1,000,000
milliseconds: 1,381
output length: 29,700,006
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.