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For a view constructed using WPF, I want to change the mouse cursor to a hourglass when the application is busy and nonresponsive.

One solution is to add

 this.Cursor = Cursors.Wait;

to all the places that may cause the UI to become non-responsive. But obviously this is not the best solution. I am wondering what is the best way to achive this?

Is it possible to achive this by using Styles or Resources?

Thanks,

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6 Answers 6

up vote 76 down vote accepted

We did a disposable class that changes the cursor for us when the app is going to take long, it looks like this:

public class WaitCursor : IDisposable
{
    private Cursor _previousCursor;

    public WaitCursor()
    {
        _previousCursor = Mouse.OverrideCursor;

        Mouse.OverrideCursor = Cursors.Wait;
    }

    #region IDisposable Members

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Mouse.OverrideCursor = _previousCursor;
    }

    #endregion
}

And we use it like this:

using(new WaitCursor())
{
    // very long task
}

Might not be the greatest design, but it does the trick =)

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Well done on using IDisposable! A good way to make sure we always return to the previous cursor. –  Xavier Poinas Aug 13 '10 at 23:56
2  
I had exactly the same idea some time ago. But I wrapped the code as a private class inside a UI services facade class, and returned instances of it via a "ShowWaitCursor" method. So you had to do: using(uiServices.ShowWaitCursor()). Looks cumbersome but it eases unit testing. –  Konamiman Mar 23 '11 at 10:52
    
a bit offtopic: how to implement dispose correctly... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms244737.aspx –  Michael Sander Nov 17 '13 at 11:38
    
@Carlo , I am using the class above.However the line Public WaitCursor() is giving me an error. Y so ? It says method must have a return type. –  Anoushka Seechurn Dec 10 '13 at 5:40
2  
@AnoushkaSeechurn WaitCursor() is not a method, it's a constructor. I'm guessing you renamed the class to something else than 'WaitCursor'? –  Carlo Dec 10 '13 at 16:03

I used the answers here to build something that worked better for me. The problem is that when the using block in Carlo's answer finishes, the UI might actually still be busy databinding. There might be lazy-loaded data or events firing as a result of what was done in the block. In my case it sometimes took several seconds from the waitcursor disappeared until the UI was actually ready. I solved it by creating a helper method that sets the waitcursor and also takes care of setting up a timer that will automatically set the cursor back when the UI is ready. I can't be sure that this design will work in all cases, but it worked for me:

    /// <summary>
    ///   Contains helper methods for UI, so far just one for showing a waitcursor
    /// </summary>
    public static class UiServices
    {

    /// <summary>
    ///   A value indicating whether the UI is currently busy
    /// </summary>
    private static bool IsBusy;

    /// <summary>
    /// Sets the busystate as busy.
    /// </summary>
    public static void SetBusyState()
    {
        SetBusyState(true);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Sets the busystate to busy or not busy.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="busy">if set to <c>true</c> the application is now busy.</param>
        private static void SetBusyState(bool busy)
        {
            if (busy != IsBusy)
            {
                IsBusy = busy;
                Mouse.OverrideCursor = busy ? Cursors.Wait : null;

                if (IsBusy)
                {
                    new DispatcherTimer(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(0), DispatcherPriority.ApplicationIdle, dispatcherTimer_Tick, Application.Current.Dispatcher);
                }
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Handles the Tick event of the dispatcherTimer control.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="sender">The source of the event.</param>
        /// <param name="e">The <see cref="System.EventArgs"/> instance containing the event data.</param>
        private static void dispatcherTimer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
                var dispatcherTimer = sender as DispatcherTimer;
                if (dispatcherTimer != null)
                {
                    SetBusyState(false);
                    dispatcherTimer.Stop();
                }
        }
    }
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+1! Cleanest implementation out there, works perfectly in one line of code. Kudos! –  Hannish Jan 2 '13 at 10:56
    
+1 very good code, how will you implement same for C# Winforms. instead: Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor; //busy Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default; –  Zeeshanef Oct 12 '13 at 16:11

The best way would be to not cause the UI to become non-responsive ever, offloading all of the work to other threads/tasks as appropriate.

Other than that, you're kindof in a catch-22: if you did add a way to detect that the ui is non-responsive, there's no good way to change the cursor, as the place you'd need to do that (the even thread) is non-responsive... You might be able to pinvoke out to standard win32 code to change the cursor for the whole window, though?

Otherwise, you'd have to do it pre-emptively, like your question suggests.

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Be careful here because fiddling with the Wait Cursor can cause some problems with STA threads. Make sure that if you use this thing that you are doing it within its own thread. I posted an example here Run inside an STA which uses this to show a WaitCursor while the spawned file is starting up, and does not blow up (the main application) AFAICT.

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Changing the cursor doesn't means the application will not respond to mouse and keyboard events after the long running task has finished. To avoid user missleading, I use the class below that removes all the keyboard and mouse messages from the application message queue.

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Windows.Input;

public class WpfHourGlass : IDisposable
{

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
    private struct POINTAPI
    {
        public int x;
        public int y;
    }

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
    private struct MSG
    {
        public int hwnd;
        public int message;
        public int wParam;
        public int lParam;
        public int time;
        public POINTAPI pt;
    }
    private const short PM_REMOVE = 0x1;
    private const short WM_MOUSELAST = 0x209;
    private const short WM_MOUSEFIRST = 0x200;
    private const short WM_KEYFIRST = 0x100;
    private const short WM_KEYLAST = 0x108;
    [DllImport("user32", EntryPoint = "PeekMessageA", CharSet = CharSet.Ansi, SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
    private static extern int PeekMessage([MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Struct)]
    ref MSG lpMsg, int hwnd, int wMsgFilterMin, int wMsgFilterMax, int wRemoveMsg);

    public WpfHourGlass()
    {
        Mouse.OverrideCursor = Cursors.Wait;
        bActivated = true;
    }
    public void Show(bool Action = true)
    {
        if (Action)
        {
            Mouse.OverrideCursor = Cursors.Wait;
        }
        else
        {
            Mouse.OverrideCursor = Cursors.Arrow;
        }

        bActivated = Action;

    }
    #region "IDisposable Support"
    // To detect redundant calls
    private bool disposedValue;
    private bool bActivated;
    // IDisposable
    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!this.disposedValue)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                //remove todas as mensagens de mouse
                //e teclado que tenham sido produzidas
                //durante o processamento e estejam
                //enfileiradas
                if (bActivated)
                {
                    MSG pMSG = new MSG();
                    while (Convert.ToBoolean(PeekMessage(ref pMSG, 0, WM_KEYFIRST, WM_KEYLAST, PM_REMOVE)))
                    {
                    }
                    while (Convert.ToBoolean(PeekMessage(ref pMSG, 0, WM_MOUSEFIRST, WM_MOUSELAST, PM_REMOVE)))
                    {
                    }
                    Mouse.OverrideCursor = Cursors.Arrow;

                }
            }

            // TODO: free unmanaged resources (unmanaged objects) and override Finalize() below.
            // TODO: set large fields to null.
        }
        this.disposedValue = true;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        // Do not change this code.  Put cleanup code in Dispose(ByVal disposing As Boolean) above.
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
    #endregion

}
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I personnaly prefer to not see to mouse pointer switching many times from hourglass to arrow. To help prevent that behavior while calling embedded functions that take a while and each try to control the mouse pointer, I use a stack (counter) that I call a LifeTrackerStack. And only when the stack is empty (counter to 0) that I set back the hour glass to an arrow.

I also use MVVM. I also prefer thread safe code.

In my root class of model I declare my LifeTrackerStack that I either populate in childs model classes or use directly from child model classes when I have access to it from them.

My life tracker have 2 states/actions:

  • Alive (counter > 0) => turn Model.IsBusy to true;
  • Done (counter == 0) => turn Model.IsBusy to false;

Then in my view, I manually bind to my Model.IsBusy and do:

void ModelPropertyChanged(object sender, System.ComponentModel.PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.PropertyName == "IsBusy")
    {
        if (this._modelViewAnalysis.IsBusy)
        {
            if (Application.Current.Dispatcher.CheckAccess())
            {
                this.Cursor = Cursors.Wait;
            }
            else
            {
                Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() => this.Cursor = Cursors.Wait));
            }
        }
        else
        {
            Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() => this.Cursor = null));
        }
    }

This is my class LifeTrackerStack:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;

namespace HQ.Util.General
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Usage is to have only one event for a recursive call on many objects
    /// </summary>
    public class LifeTrackerStack
    {
        // ******************************************************************
        protected readonly Action _stackCreationAction;
        protected readonly Action _stackDisposeAction;
        private int _refCount = 0;
        private object _objLock = new object();
        // ******************************************************************
        public LifeTrackerStack(Action stackCreationAction = null, Action stackDisposeAction = null)
        {
            _stackCreationAction = stackCreationAction;
            _stackDisposeAction = stackDisposeAction;
        }

        // ******************************************************************
        /// <summary>
        /// Return a new LifeTracker to be used in a 'using' block in order to ensure reliability
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public LifeTracker GetNewLifeTracker()
        {
            LifeTracker lifeTracker = new LifeTracker(AddRef, RemoveRef);

            return lifeTracker;
        }

        // ******************************************************************
        public int Count
        {
            get { return _refCount; }
        }

        // ******************************************************************
        public void Reset()
        {
            lock (_objLock)
            {
                _refCount = 0;
                if (_stackDisposeAction != null)
                {
                    _stackDisposeAction();
                }
            }
        }

        // ******************************************************************
        private void AddRef()
        {
            lock (_objLock)
            {
                if (_refCount == 0)
                {
                    if (_stackCreationAction != null)
                    {
                        _stackCreationAction();
                    }
                }
                _refCount++;
            }
        }

        // ******************************************************************
        private void RemoveRef()
        {
            bool shouldDispose = false;
            lock (_objLock)
            {
                if (_refCount > 0)
                {
                    _refCount--;
                }

                if (_refCount == 0)
                {
                    if (_stackDisposeAction != null)
                    {
                        _stackDisposeAction();
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        // ******************************************************************
    }
}


using System;

namespace HQ.Util.General
{
    public delegate void ActionDelegate();

    public class LifeTracker : IDisposable
    {
        private readonly ActionDelegate _actionDispose;
        public LifeTracker(ActionDelegate actionCreation, ActionDelegate actionDispose)
        {
            _actionDispose = actionDispose;

            if (actionCreation != null)
                actionCreation();
        }

        private bool _disposed = false;
        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose(true);
            // This object will be cleaned up by the Dispose method.
            // Therefore, you should call GC.SupressFinalize to
            // take this object off the finalization queue
            // and prevent finalization code for this object
            // from executing a second time.
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }

        protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            // Check to see if Dispose has already been called.
            if (!this._disposed)
            {
                // If disposing equals true, dispose all managed
                // and unmanaged resources.
                if (disposing)
                {
                    _actionDispose();
                }

                // Note disposing has been done.
                _disposed = true;
            }
        }
    }
}

And the usage of it:

    _busyStackLifeTracker = new LifeTrackerStack
        (
            () =>
            {
                this.IsBusy = true;
            },
            () =>
            {
                this.IsBusy = false;
            }
        );

Everywhere I have lengthy jog, I do:

        using (this.BusyStackLifeTracker.GetNewLifeTracker())
        {
            // long job
        }

It works for me. Hope it could help any! Eric

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