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What's the difference between the following type definitions

<E extends Number>

and

<? extends Number>

Cheers, Don

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3 Answers 3

This version:

<? extends Number>

can appear in a non-generic method/type, and it basically means "I don't care what the type is, so long as it derives from Number. I'm not going to really use the type, I just need it to be appropriate."

This version:

<E extends Number>

requires E to be a type parameter. It allows you to do more (for instance, creating an ArrayList<E> later on) but the extra type parameter can make things more complicated when you don't really need them to be.

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More formally, would it be true to say that the second one is a formal type parameter definition, whereas the first is simply a parameter definiton? –  Dónal Dec 7 '08 at 22:21
    
Would it be true to say that you should use the second definition only when you need to refer to the type (via the 'alias' E)? –  Dónal Dec 7 '08 at 22:25
    
I wouldn't like to say on the first comment without consulting the spec (and I'm off to bed in a minute). The second comment seems reasonable though. Check what Josh Bloch has to say in Effective Java - he probably covers it :) –  Jon Skeet Dec 7 '08 at 22:57
1  
Actually, the question occurred to me while reading Effective Java! –  Dónal Dec 7 '08 at 23:34

As an expansion on @Jon Skeet's answer, see

Which types are permitted as type parameter bounds?

in the excellent resource Java Generics FAQ from Angelika Langer

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For all Java Generics related questions, I highly recommend "Java Generics and Collections" by Maurice Naftalin, Philip Wadler.

Angelika Langer's FAQ is OK, but it is also huge and somewhat rote.

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