Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I came across a strange situation where using a parallel stream with a lambda in a static initializer takes seemingly forever with no CPU utilization. Here's the code:

class Deadlock {
    static {
        IntStream.range(0, 10000).parallel().map(i -> i).count();
        System.out.println("done");
    }
    public static void main(final String[] args) {}
}

This appears to be a minimum reproducing test case for this behavior. If I:

  • put the block in the main method instead of a static initializer,
  • remove parallelization, or
  • remove the lambda,

the code instantly completes. Can anyone explain this behavior? Is it a bug or is this intended?

I am using OpenJDK version 1.8.0_66-internal.

share|improve this question
3  
With range (0, 1) the program terminates normally. With (0, 2) or higher hangs. – Laszlo Hirdi Jan 15 at 21:53
5  
similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/34222669/… – Alex Jan 15 at 23:06
2  
Actually it is exactly the same question/issue, just with a different API. – Didier L Jan 15 at 23:15
2  
You are trying to use a class, in a background thread, when you haven't finished initialising the class so it can't be used in a background thread. – Peter Lawrey Jan 15 at 23:16
3  
@Solomonoff'sSecret as i -> i is not a method reference it is a static method implemented in the Deadlock class. If replace i -> i with Function.identity() this code should be fine. – Peter Lawrey Jan 16 at 0:20
up vote 61 down vote accepted

I found a bug report of a very similar case (JDK-8143380) which was closed as "Not an Issue" by Stuart Marks:

This is a class initialization deadlock. The test program's main thread executes the class static initializer, which sets the initialization in-progress flag for the class; this flag remains set until the static initializer completes. The static initializer executes a parallel stream, which causes lambda expressions to be evaluated in other threads. Those threads block waiting for the class to complete initialization. However, the main thread is blocked waiting for the parallel tasks to complete, resulting in deadlock.

The test program should be changed to move the parallel stream logic outside of the class static initializer. Closing as Not an Issue.


I was able to find another bug report of that (JDK-8136753), also closed as "Not an Issue" by Stuart Marks:

This is a deadlock that is occurring because the Fruit enum's static initializer is interacting badly with class initialization.

See the Java Language Specification, section 12.4.2 for details on class initialization.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se8/html/jls-12.html#jls-12.4.2

Briefly, what's happening is as follows.

  1. The main thread references the Fruit class and starts the initialization process. This sets the initialization in-progress flag and runs the static initializer on the main thread.
  2. The static initializer runs some code in another thread and waits for it to finish. This example uses parallel streams, but this has nothing to do with streams per se. Executing code in another thread by any means, and waiting for that code to finish, will have the same effect.
  3. The code in the other thread references the Fruit class, which checks the initialization in-progress flag. This causes the other thread to block until the flag is cleared. (See step 2 of JLS 12.4.2.)
  4. The main thread is blocked waiting for the other thread to terminate, so the static initializer never completes. Since the initialization in-progress flag isn't cleared until after the static initializer completes, the threads are deadlocked.

To avoid this problem, make sure that a class's static initialization completes quickly, without causing other threads to execute code that requires this class to have completed initialization.

Closing as Not an Issue.


Note that FindBugs has an open issue for adding a warning for this situation.

share|improve this answer
14  
"This was considered when we designed the feature" and "We know what causes this bug but not how to fix it" do not mean "this is not a bug". This is absolutely a bug. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 16 at 0:39
8  
@bayou.io The main issue is using threads within static initializers, not lambdas. – Stuart Marks Jan 16 at 23:31
2  
BTW Tunaki thanks for digging up my bug reports. :-) – Stuart Marks Jan 16 at 23:32
9  
@bayou.io: it’s the same thing on class level as it would be in a constructor, letting this escape during object construction. The basic rule is, don’t use multi-threaded operations in initializers. I don’t think that this is hard to understand. Your example of registering a lambda implemented function into a registry is a different thing, it doesn’t create deadlocks unless you are going to wait for one these blocked background threads. Nevertheless, I strongly discourage from doing such operations in a class initializer. It’s not what they are meant for. – Holger Jan 18 at 12:07
6  
I guess the programming style lesson is: keep static initalizers simple. – Raedwald Jan 19 at 8:20

For those who are wondering where are the other threads referencing the Deadlock class itself, Java lambdas behave like you wrote this:

public class Deadlock {
    public static int lambda1(int i) {
        return i;
    }
    static {
        IntStream.range(0, 10000).parallel().map(new IntUnaryOperator() {
            @Override
            public int applyAsInt(int operand) {
                return lambda1(operand);
            }
        }).count();
        System.out.println("done");
    }
    public static void main(final String[] args) {}
}

With regular anonymous classes there is no deadlock:

public class Deadlock {
    static {
        IntStream.range(0, 10000).parallel().map(new IntUnaryOperator() {
            @Override
            public int applyAsInt(int operand) {
                return operand;
            }
        }).count();
        System.out.println("done");
    }
    public static void main(final String[] args) {}
}
share|improve this answer
3  
@Solomonoff'sSecret It's an implementation choice. The code in the lambda has to go somewhere. Javac compiles it into a static method in the containing class (analogous to lambda1 i this example). Putting each lambda into its own class would have been considerably more expensive. – Stuart Marks Jan 15 at 23:30
1  
@StuartMarks Given that the lambda creates a class implementing the functional interface, wouldn't it be just as efficient to put the implementation of the lambda in the implementation of the functional interface's lambda as in the second example of this post? That's certainly the obvious way to do things but I'm sure there's a reason why they're done the way they are. – Solomonoff's Secret Jan 16 at 0:20
4  
@Solomonoff'sSecret The lambda might create a class at runtime (via java.lang.invoke.LambdaMetafactory), but the lambda body must be placed somewhere at compile time. The lambda classes can thus take advantage of some VM magic to be less expensive than normal classes loaded from .class files. – Jeffrey Bosboom Jan 16 at 2:04
1  
@Solomonoff'sSecret Yes, Jeffrey Bosboom's reply is correct. If in a future JVM it becomes possible to add a method to an existing class, the metafactory might do that instead of spinning a new class. (Pure speculation.) – Stuart Marks Jan 16 at 2:38
1  
@Solomonoff's Secret: don’t judge by looking at such trivial lambda expressions like your i -> i; they won’t be the norm. Lambda expressions may use all members of their surrounding class, including private ones, and that makes the defining class itself their natural place. Letting all these use cases suffer from an implementation optimized for the special case of class initializers with multi-threaded use of trivial lambda expressions, not using members of their defining class, is not a viable option. – Holger Jan 18 at 12:17

There is an excellent explanation of this problem by Andrei Pangin, dated by 07 Apr 2015. It is available here, but it is written in Russian (I suggest to review code samples anyway - they are international). The general problem is a lock during class initialization.

Here are some quotes from the article:


According to JLS, every class has a unique initialization lock that is captured during initialization. When other thread tries to access this class during initialization, it will be blocked on the lock until initialization completes. When classes are initialized concurrently, it is possible to get a deadlock.

I wrote a simple program that calculates the sum of integers, what should it print?

public class StreamSum {
    static final int SUM = IntStream.range(0, 100).parallel().reduce((n, m) -> n + m).getAsInt();

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(SUM);
    }
} 

Now remove parallel() or replace lambda with Integer::sum call - what will change?

Here we see deadlock again [there were some examples of deadlocks in class initializers previously in the article]. Because of the parallel() stream operations run in a separate thread pool. These threads try to execute lambda body, which is written in bytecode as a private static method inside StreamSum class. But this method can not be executed before the completion of class static initializer, which waits the results of stream completion.

What is more mindblowing: this code works differently in different environments. It will work correctly on a single CPU machine and will most likely hang on a multi CPU machine. This difference comes from the Fork-Join pool implementation. You can verify it yourself changing the parameter -Djava.util.concurrent.ForkJoinPool.common.parallelism=N

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.