Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

To make a string a null string i wrote this:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
#include<string.h>
int main()
{
    char str[15]="fahad uddin";
    strlen(str);
    puts(str);
    for(int i=0;str[i]!='\0';i++)
        strcpy(&str[i],"\0") ;
    puts(str);
    getch();
    return 0;
}

Before this i tried:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
#include<string.h>
int main()
{
    char str[15]="fahad uddin";
    strlen(str);
    puts(str);
    for(int i=0;str[i]!='\0';i++,strcpy(&str[i],"\0"))
        ;
    puts(str);
    getch();
    return 0;
}

In the first example, the program runs all right while when in the second example it prints the first letter of the string (in this example F). Why is this?

share|improve this question
6  
In 1 line it would be str[0] = '\0';. –  kennytm Aug 14 '10 at 7:18
    
lol your a prO sir :) –  Fahad Uddin Aug 14 '10 at 7:42
    
for (char*p = str; *p; *p++='\0' ); –  CyberSpock Aug 14 '10 at 7:46
    
@KennyTM put this in an answer so I can vote it up –  Nathan Fellman Aug 14 '10 at 8:02
    
Also, the line strlen(str); without reading the return value has no purpose... –  adamk Aug 14 '10 at 8:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

C strings are null-terminated. As long as you only use the functions assuming null-terminated strings, you could just zero the first character.

str[0] = '\0';
share|improve this answer
memset(str,0,strlen(str)); /* should also work */
memset(str,0,sizeof str); /* initialize the entire content */
share|improve this answer

for(int i=0;str[i]!='\0';i++,strcpy(&str[i],"\0")); - the i++ is incrementing i before the strcpy executes - so it'll be taking the address of str[1] on the first iteration - skipping over str[0] - hence you'll get the first character.

Note that KennyTM's response is a far better way of doing this - but I guess you're learning / experimenting.

share|improve this answer
    
I read that the expressions proceeds from right to left.strcpy() should proceed frist then? –  Fahad Uddin Aug 14 '10 at 7:47
    
If you want to use this approach then yes, strcpy should be on the left hand side of the comma - the items are executed left-to-right. –  Will A Aug 14 '10 at 7:53
    
I said that they proceed from left to right i.e strcpy in this example should be performed first and then i++ –  Fahad Uddin Aug 14 '10 at 17:45

Because i++,strcpy(&str[i],"\0") evaluates the i++ before it evaluates the call to strcpy() which uses the now incremented value of i as its destination. In effect, it skips the first character of your string.

Note that there are much better ways to do what you want.

KennyTM mentioned just setting the first character to '\0' with str[0] = '\0';, which doesn't clear every byte but does mark the string as having zero length.

There is also memset() which is used to fill a block of memory with any arbitrary value, and 0 is certainly allowed.

Furthermore, calling strcpy() is far less efficient that just assigning to each element of str[] in the loop.

share|improve this answer

Try with this code:

bzero(string_name, size_of_string);

Also, include the <string.h> lib file. I think this must work.

share|improve this answer
1  
bzero is a legacy BSD function that duplicates the standard C memset. It shouldn't be recommended for new code. –  R.. Aug 14 '10 at 8:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.