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I have this piece of code :

var obj1;
var obj2;

function x() {
    obj1 = this;
}

function y() {
    obj2 = this;
}

x();
y();

console.log(obj1 === obj2);
console.log(obj1 === this);

I ran this code in NodeJS using command line : node app.js and ran as a script in Chrome browser

The result : in NodeJS, the result was : true false NodeJS result

In Chrome browser, the result was : true true Browser result

How can this happened ? can anyone explain what really going on under the hood ?

share|improve this question
    
you might want to print out this to see what it actually is. In a browser it should be window by default, in node i am not sure what it is. – tkausl Jan 17 at 13:18

In the browser, running in the global scope, this is always window in your example

var obj1;
var obj2;

function x() {
    obj1 = this; // window
}

function y() {
    obj2 = this; // window
}

x();
y();

console.log(obj1 === obj2);  // window === window = true
console.log(obj1 === this);  // window === window = true

This is not how it works in Node. In Node.js all modules (script files) are executed in their own closure while browsers execute all script files directly within the global scope.

In other words, in just about any file running in Node, this will just be an empty object, as Node wraps the code in an anonymous function that is called immediately, and you'd access the global scope within that context with GLOBAL instead.

This is also mentioned in the Globals documentation:

Some of these objects aren't actually in the global scope but in the module scope - this will be noted.

However, when calling a function without a specific context in Node.js, it will normally be defaulted to the global object - The same GLOBAL mentioned earlier, as it's execution context.

So outside the functions, this is an empty object, as the code is wrapped in a function by Node, to create it's own execution context for every module (script file), while inside the functions, because they are called with no specified execution context, this is the Node GLOBAL object

In Node.js you'd get

var obj1;
var obj2;

function x() {
    obj1 = this; // GLOBAL
}

function y() {
    obj2 = this; // GLOBAL
}

x();
y();

console.log(obj1 === obj2);  // GLOBAL === GLOBAL = true
console.log(obj1 === this);  // GLOBAL === {} = false

Where the last this is indeed an empty object, as explained above


For completeness, it's worth noting that in strict mode, you'd get the same result in a browser (true, false) as in Node, but that's because the variables are just the opposite of what they are in Node

"use strict"

var obj1;
var obj2;

function x() {
    obj1 = this; // undefined
}

function y() {
    obj2 = this; // undefined
}

x();
y();

console.log(obj1 === obj2);  // undefined === undefined = true
console.log(obj1 === this);  // undefined === window = false

This is because the value passed as this to a function in strict mode is not forced into being an object (a.k.a. "boxed").
For a normal function in non-strict mode, this is always an object, and it's always the global object if called with an undefined or null this-value, i.e. without a specific execution context.

Not only is automatic boxing a performance cost, but exposing the global object in browsers is a security hazard, because the global object provides access to functionality that "secure" JavaScript environments must restrict.

Thus for a strict mode function, the specified this is not boxed into an object, and if unspecified, this will be undefined inside functions, as shown above, but this will still be the window in the global scope.

The same thing happens in strict-mode in Node.js, where this inside the functions is no longer GLOBAL but undefined, and this outside the functions will still be the same empty object, and the end result will still be true, false, but the value of this will be different in strict-mode in Node.js as well.

share|improve this answer
1  
Does anyone know why Node uses an empty object as the context when executing a module? (I can't imagine it is an attempt to protect the global, since the global is used as the context when a function is called.) – joeytwiddle Jan 17 at 15:20
    
@joeytwiddle - I have no idea, I'm guessing every module ran is just put inside something like (function() { code }()); and someone decided to make this an empty object, as this should always be defined, and they didn't want it to be the global object by default. – adeneo Jan 17 at 15:32
    
Perhaps it is an attempt to protect the global, but they still had to use the global as the context object when a function is called, because that is what the language specification demands. – joeytwiddle Jan 17 at 17:03
3  
You might want to mention how strict mode impacts this (pun intended:) – Jared Smith Jan 17 at 19:04

Node explicitly sets this to the module exports here:

const result = compiledWrapper.apply(this.exports, args);

What apply does is explicitly fixate the this value (and parameters) - in this case - it sets it to this.exports. For example you can do:

(function() { console.log(this.x); }).apply({x:3}); // alerts 3

Node override's the default behavior. It has to, however, call functions inside the object with global - as is mandated by the JS spec.

share|improve this answer
    
Note, this initially started as a comment on adeneo's answer - I decided since it stands for itself I'd post it as a separate answer and upvote his. See his answer for more reasoning rather than "here's the code that makes it happen". – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jan 17 at 19:52

In the Browser-Context the last this points to the Windowobject, which does exist in Node-Context. Therefore the last this is an empty object. The occurrences of this in the functions however point to some global object in the Node-Context.

share|improve this answer

The difference is pretty simple

In the node environment :

this refers to module.exports or exports for short. but inside a function this is refering to the entire Node.js package.

you can see it if you log to the console the following :

function test(){
    console.log('this inside a function = ',this);
}

console.log('this outside a function = ',this);
test();

Whereas in the browser environment this inside a function or outside a function is referring to the window object unless you are using the new keyword which is another story.

Execute the previous example in both Node.js and browser environments and you will understand.

share|improve this answer
1  
In strict mode - this would be undefined inside the function – Ashu Joshi Feb 16 at 21:46

I have no Node.js server in a hand right now, but I think you can yourself research this question, and give answer for us :D see code below

Try to run:

console.log(this.constructor.name+" "+obj1.constructor.name+" "+obj2.constructor.name);

And also you can debug "Parent Class" name in a function:

function x() {
    console.log("x this: "+this.constructor.name);
    obj1 = this;
}

function y() {
    console.log("y this: "+this.constructor.name);
    obj2 = this;
}

And for view Object methods / properties you can use something like this:

for (a in obj2) {
    console.log("obj2." + a + " = " + obj2[a]);
}
share|improve this answer

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