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Is it possible in PHP to do something like this? How would you go about writing a function? Here is an example. The order is the most important thing.

$customer['address'] = '123 fake st';
$customer['name'] = 'Tim';
$customer['dob'] = '12/08/1986';
$customer['dontSortMe'] = 'this value doesnt need to be sorted';

And I'd like to do something like

$properOrderedArray = sortArrayByArray($customer, array('name', 'dob', 'address'));

Because at the end I use a foreach() and they're not in the right order (because I append the values to a string which needs to be in the correct order and I don't know in advance all of the array keys/values).

I've looked through PHP's internal array functions but it seems you can only sort alphabetically or numerically.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 55 down vote accepted

There you go:

function sortArrayByArray(Array $array, Array $orderArray) {
    $ordered = array();
    foreach($orderArray as $key) {
        if(array_key_exists($key,$array)) {
            $ordered[$key] = $array[$key];
            unset($array[$key]);
        }
    }
    return $ordered + $array;
}
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7  
So you can join 2 arrays with a + sign? I never knew that, I've been using array_merge()! –  alex Sep 24 '09 at 23:08
3  
Is this better than using usort() or uasort()? –  grantwparks Sep 25 '09 at 19:57
    
foreach($orderArray as $key => $v) did the trick for me –  J.C. Inacio Sep 26 '11 at 2:06
3  
You should insert a break statement once value has been found. –  Adel Sep 26 '11 at 14:50
4  
Have a look at Darkwaltz4 answer using only array_merge without a function and vote it up, this is overkill! –  4levels Aug 24 '12 at 9:54

Just use array_merge. It works by starting with the array you give it (in the proper order) and overwriting/adding the keys with data from your actual array:

$customer['address'] = '123 fake st';
$customer['name'] = 'Tim';
$customer['dob'] = '12/08/1986';
$customer['dontSortMe'] = 'this value doesnt need to be sorted';

$properOrderedArray = array_merge(array_flip(array('name', 'dob', 'address')), $customer);

//$properOrderedArray -> array('name' => 'Tim', 'address' => '123 fake st', 'dob' => '12/08/1986', 'dontSortMe' => 'this value doesnt need to be sorted')

ps - I'm answering this 'stale' question, because I think all the loops given as previous answers are overkill.

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3  
+1, not sure why this doesn't have more up-votes. Seems like the most elegant solution to me. –  Dominic P Aug 8 '12 at 21:09
7  
It works nicely if you have string keys but not for the numerical one. PHP Docs: "If the input arrays have the same string keys, then the later value for that key will overwrite the previous one. If, however, the arrays contain numeric keys, the later value will not overwrite the original value, but will be appended." –  bolbol Nov 7 '12 at 6:52
    
absolutely awesome! Thanks for this one! Made my day. –  Polosson Oct 10 '13 at 13:17
    
Nice, but what if the keys do not exist in the values? I need this, but only if any of the keys exist... Probably need a foreach on it then... –  Solomon Closson May 8 at 22:49
    
this is definitely the most clear and elegant solution –  Marco Palermo Jul 17 at 13:18
function sortArrayByArray(array $toSort, array $sortByValuesAsKeys)
{
    $commonKeysInOrder = array_intersect_key(array_flip($sortByValuesAsKeys), $toSort);
    $commonKeysWithValue = array_intersect_key($toSort, $commonKeysInOrder);
    $sorted = array_merge($commonKeysInOrder, $commonKeysWithValue);
    return $sorted;
}
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I didn't know you could cast function arguments like that in PHP! –  alex Dec 8 '08 at 5:34
2  
Arrays and classes only. –  OIS Dec 8 '08 at 7:33
    
thanks a lot for this one :) –  HungryCoder Nov 3 '11 at 9:39
    
I like array functions, +1 for avoiding foreach ; ) –  Radek Jul 10 '12 at 14:21
    
You don't need a function to achieve this, have a look at Darkwaltz4 answer below using only array_merge and vote his answer up –  4levels Aug 24 '12 at 9:55

Take one array as your order:

$order = array('north', 'east', 'south', 'west');

You can sort another array based on values using array_intersect­Docs:

/* sort by value: */
$array = array('south', 'west', 'north');
$sorted = array_intersect($order, $array);
print_r($sorted);

Or in your case, to sort by keys, use array_intersect_key­Docs:

/* sort by key: */
$array = array_flip($array);
$sorted = array_intersect_key(array_flip($order), $array);
print_r($sorted);

Both functions will keep the order of the first parameter and will only return the values (or keys) from the second array.

So for these two standard cases you don't need to write a function on your own to perform the sorting/re-arranging.

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1  
Thanks Hakre (+1). I like to think I've learned a few things since 2008 :) –  alex Dec 28 '11 at 22:59
    
The intersect would get rid of those entries he doesn't know in advance. –  DanMan Mar 6 '13 at 15:02

Another way for PHP >= 5.3.0:

$customer['address'] = '123 fake st';
$customer['name'] = 'Tim';
$customer['dob'] = '12/08/1986';
$customer['dontSortMe'] = 'this value doesnt need to be sorted';

$customerSorted = array_replace(array_flip(array('name', 'dob', 'address')), $customer);

Result:

Array (
  [name] => Tim
  [dob] => 12/08/1986
  [address] => 123 fake st
  [dontSortMe] => this value doesnt need to be sorted
)

Works fine with string and numeric keys.

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+ While they both work, I found array_replace() to relay intent better than array_merge(). –  Jason McCreary Feb 7 at 15:25

IF you have array in your array, you'll have to adapt the function by Eran a little bit...

function sortArrayByArray($array,$orderArray) {
    $ordered = array();
    foreach($orderArray as $key => $value) {
        if(array_key_exists($key,$array)) {
                $ordered[$key] = $array[$key];
                unset($array[$key]);
        }
    }
    return $ordered + $array;
}
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First Suggestion

 function sortArrayByArray($array,$orderArray) {
        $ordered = array();
        foreach($orderArray as $key) {
            if(array_key_exists($key,$array)) {
                    $ordered[$key] = $array[$key];
                    unset($array[$key]);
            }
        }
        return $ordered + $array;
    }

Second Suggestion

$properOrderedArray = array_merge(array_flip(array('name', 'dob', 'address')), $customer);

I wanted to point out that both of these suggestions are awesome. However, they are apples and oranges. The difference? One is non-associative friendly and the other is associative friendly. If you are using 2 fully associative arrays then the array merge/flip will actually merge and overwrite the other associative array. In my case that is not the results I was looking for. I used a settings.ini file to create my sort order array. The data array I was sorting did not need to written over by my associative sorting counterpart. Thus array merge would destroy my data array. Both are great methods, both need to be archived in any developers toolbox. Based on your needs you may find you actually need both concepts in your archives.

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I adopted the answer from @Darkwaltz4 for its brevity and would like to share how I adapted the solution to situations where the array may contain different keys for each iterations like so:

Array[0] ...
['dob'] = '12/08/1986';
['some_key'] = 'some value';

Array[1] ...
['dob'] = '12/08/1986';

Array[2] ...
['dob'] = '12/08/1986';
['some_key'] = 'some other value';

and maintained a "master key" like so:

$master_key = array( 'dob' => ' ' , 'some_key' => ' ' );

array_merge would have executed the merge in the Array[1] iteration based on $master_key and produced ['some_key'] = '', an empty value, for that iteration. Hence, array_intersect_key was used to modify $master_key in each iterations like so:

foreach ($customer as $customer) {
$modified_key = array_intersect_key($master_key, $unordered_array);
$properOrderedArray = array_merge($modified_key, $customer);
}

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