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I am trying to test in browsermob if certain input field work or not. I am attempting to use a try...catch statement which I have never used before. I know that the form is:

try {
//some code
} catch (){
//some error code
};

What exactly is supposed to be put in the parenthesis after the catch statement? When I try to use the statement it runs everything through the catch statement no matter if it is not an error. What am I doing wrong?

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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

See the try...catch statement on MDC.

In short, try/catch is used to handle exceptions (which are "thrown" using the throw statement). The syntax for try/catch is:

try {
    // Code
} catch (varName if condition) { // Mozilla extension; optional
    // If exception thrown which matches condition
    // in try block, execute this block
} catch (varName) {              // Optional
    // If exception thrown in try block,
    // execute this block
} finally {                      // Optional
    // Execute this block after
    // try or after catch clause
    // (i.e. this is *always* called)
}

varName is available to the scope of the catch block only. It refers to the exception object which was thrown (which could be any type of object (e.g. a String)).

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Thanks, I think this is making more sense now. So the parenthesis after catch holds the variable that is the errors? –  chromedude Aug 14 '10 at 18:07
    
@srmorriso, Yes; see my edit. –  strager Aug 14 '10 at 18:09
    
ok, thanks. Now it makes sense –  chromedude Aug 14 '10 at 18:14
2  
the catch identifier doesn't really need to be unique (I think that's JSLint stuff), when the catch statement runs, the scope is augmented, an object that contains a property named like the identifier is added to the scope chain, if another identifier existed in scope with the same name, it will be simply shadowed inside the catch block. –  CMS Aug 14 '10 at 18:16
    
@CMS, Okay, maybe it was JSLint telling me things. (I use JSLint in my build process.) I remember something erroring when I had two try/catch statements and the catch statements had the same variable name. I'll edit my post to exclude that statement, though, as it's not really necessary. –  strager Aug 14 '10 at 18:27
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The try catch statement is used to detected for exceptions/errors that are raised inside the try-block. In the catch block you can then react on this exceptional behavior and try to resolve it or get to a safe state.

You got the statement almost right:

try {
 // code that may fail with error/exception
} catch (e) { // e represents the exception/error object
 // react
}

Consider the following examples:

try {
  var x = parseInt("xxx");
  if(isNaN(x)){
    throw new Error("Not a number");
  }
} catch (e) { // e represents the exception/error object
 alert(e);
}

try {
 // some code
 if(!condition){
   throw new Error("Something went wrong!");
 }
} catch (e) { // e represents the exception/error object
 alert(e);
}
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so you don't necessarily need to have the finally statement? –  chromedude Aug 14 '10 at 18:15
    
yes finally is an optional part of the statement that guarantees that the code inside it is executed regardless there was an exception or not. –  Johannes Wachter Aug 20 '10 at 11:58
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the stuff inside try {...} is what you want to execute. The stuff in catch() { ... } is what you want to execute if you get any javascript errors from anything executed in the try {...}

catch {...} only executes if there is a javascript error in the try {...} block. You can find out what the error is by doing for example this:

try {
 // do something 
} catch (err) {
  alert(err);
}
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thanks, thats exactly what I was trying to find out –  chromedude Aug 14 '10 at 18:12
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the code that is likely to throw an exception goes into try { }, The code to be run when an exception is thrown, comes into catch() { }. In catch() you can specify which exceptions you want to catch, and in which automatic variables to put it. finally { } is always run, regardless whether exception was thrown or not.

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According to ECMAScript specifications,

try {
    // Code
} catch (varName) {  // optional if 'finally' block is present.
  if (condition) {   // eg. (varName instanceof URIError)
    // Condition (Type) specific error handling
  }
  else {
    // Generic error handling
  }
} finally {          // Optional if 'catch' block is present.
    // Execute this block after
    // try or after catch clause
    // (i.e. this is *always* called)
}
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