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Currently I have three tables.

GrandParent( tel int, G_Counter int, GField varchar(10));
Parent( tel int, G_Counter int, P_counter int, PField Varchar(5));
Child(tel int, G_counter int, P_counter int, C_Counter int, CField Varchar(3));

These tables are all flat tables. And these tables loop itself and the loop is determined by the counter. I need to remove those counter and create a relational schema using PK and FK.

Sample Data's are

GrandParent:

TEL    G_COUNTER  GField
 t1      1          ga
 t2      1          gb
 t2      2          gc
 t3      1          gd

Parent:

TEL     G_COUNTER   P_COUNTER  PFIELD
 t1        1           1         pa
 t1        1           2         pb
 t1        1           3         pc
 t2        1           1         pd
 t3        1           1         pe

Child:

TEL     G_COUNTER   P_COUNTER  C_COUNTER  CFIELD
 t1        1           1          1         ca
 t1        1           1          2         cb
 t1        1           1          3         cc
 t2        1           1          1         cd
 t2        1           1          2         ce
 t3        1           1          1         cd

The data on GrandParent loops and the G_COUNTER gets incremented by 1. eg. for TEL t2 G_COUNTER is 1 and 2. The data on Parent also loops P_COUNTER gets incremented accordingly and the data on Child table also loops. GrandParent table and Parent table are related with TEL and G_COUNTER field. and Parent table and Child table are related with TEL,G_COUNTER,P_COUNTER fields.

Now I want to remove those Counters and replace it with the Primary Key and Foreign Key to relate the GrandParent, Parent and Child table. Now how do I do that?

Thank you in advance for your help.

share|improve this question
    
Do you need the schema to remain as three tables - GP / P / C - or would you consider moving to a schema with a single table which self-references? –  Will A Aug 15 '10 at 0:23
    
I need to have three tables. Just need the stored procedure that will create the relational schema while inserting records. Thank you –  niceApp Aug 15 '10 at 0:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So, you have compound keys and presumably implicit relationships which you want to replace with proper primary key columns and foreign keys.

The way to approach this is in five easy pieces:

  1. Add the new columns to the tables.
  2. Populate the primary key columns.
  3. Populate the foreign key columns.
  4. Add the constraints.
  5. Drop th enugatory columns.

I will work through this using Oracle syntax, but the same principles work in SQL Server.

SQL> select * from grandparent
  2  /

TE  G_COUNTER GF
-- ---------- --
t1          1 ga
t2          1 gb
t2          2 gc
t3          1 gd

SQL> select * from parent
  2  /

TE  G_COUNTER  P_COUNTER PF
-- ---------- ---------- --
t1          1          1 pa
t1          1          2 pb
t1          1          3 pc
t2          1          1 pd
t3          1          1 pe

SQL> select * from child
  2  /

TE  G_COUNTER  P_COUNTER  C_COUNTER CF
-- ---------- ---------- ---------- --
t1          1          1          1 ca
t1          1          1          2 cb
t1          1          1          3 cc
t2          1          1          1 cd
t2          1          1          2 ce
t3          1          1          1 cd

6 rows selected.

SQL>

Step 1: Add the new columns

SQL> alter table grandparent
  2      add g_id number
  3  /

Table altered.

SQL> alter table parent
  2      add p_id number
  3      add g_id number
  4  /

Table altered.


SQL> alter table child
  2      add c_id number
  3      add p_id number
  4  /

Table altered.

SQL>

Step 2: Populate the primary keys

SQL> update grandparent
  2      set g_id = rownum
  3  /

4 rows updated.

SQL> update parent
  2      set p_id = rownum
  3  /

5 rows updated.

SQL> update child
  2      set c_id = rownum
  3  /

6 rows updated.

SQL>

Step 3: Populate the foreign keys

SQL> update parent p
  2      set g_id = ( select g_id
  3                   from grandparent g
  4                   where g.tel = p.tel
  5                   and   g.g_counter = p.g_counter)
  6  /

5 rows updated.

SQL> update child c
  2      set p_id = ( select p_id
  3                   from parent p
  4                   where p.tel = c.tel
  5                   and   p.g_counter = c.g_counter
  6                   and   p.p_counter = c.p_counter)
  7  /

6 rows updated.

SQL>

Step 4: Add the constraints

SQL> alter table grandparent
  2      modify g_id not null
  3      add constraint g_pk primary key (g_id) using index
  4  /

Table altered.

SQL> alter table parent
  2      modify p_id not null
  3      add constraint p_g_fk foreign key (g_id)
  4          references grandparent (g_id)
  5      add constraint p_pk primary key (p_id) using index
  6  /

Table altered.

SQL> alter table child
  2      modify c_id not null
  3      add constraint c_p_fk foreign key (p_id)
  4          references parent (p_id)
  5      add constraint c_pk primary key (c_id) using index
  6  /

Table altered.

SQL>

Step 5: Drop the nugatory columns

I am presuming that GRANDPARENT (TEL, G_COUNTER) represents some kind of business key. So rather than dropping them I suggest you add a unique constraint to enforce the rule. The same might be true for PARENT(G_ID, P_COUNTER) and CHILD(G_ID, C_COUNTER). You know your data better than I do. Hence the following statements are indicative of the sort of thing you might want to do; adjust them according to your needs.

SQL> alter table grandparent
  2      add constraint g_uk unique (tel, g_counter) using index
  3  /

Table altered.

SQL> alter table parent
  2      add constraint p_uk unique (g_id, p_counter) using index
  3  /

Table altered.

SQL> alter table parent
  2      drop column tel
  3  /

Table altered.

SQL> alter table parent
  2      drop column g_counter
  3  /

Table altered.

SQL> alter table child
  2      drop column tel
  3  /

Table altered.

SQL> alter table child
  2      drop column g_counter
  3  /

Table altered.

SQL> alter table child
  2      drop column p_counter
  3  /

Table altered.

SQL> alter table child
  2      add constraint c_uk unique (p_id, c_counter) using index
  3  /

Table altered.

SQL>

Let's check the tables:

SQL> select * from grandparent
  2  /

TE  G_COUNTER GF       G_ID
-- ---------- -- ----------
t1          1 ga          1
t2          1 gb          2
t2          2 gc          3
t3          1 gd          4

SQL> select * from parent
  2  /

 P_COUNTER PF       P_ID       G_ID
---------- -- ---------- ----------
         1 pa          1          1
         2 pb          2          1
         3 pc          3          1
         1 pd          4          2
         1 pe          5          4

SQL> select * from child
  2  /

 C_COUNTER CF       C_ID       P_ID
---------- -- ---------- ----------
         1 ca          1          1
         2 cb          2          1
         3 cc          3          1
         1 cd          4          4
         2 ce          5          4
         1 cd          6          5

6 rows selected.

SQL>

Maintaining the primary keys requires different techniques in different flavours of DBMS. Oracle uses sequences, SQL Server uses AUTO INCREMENT. That is a separate question, which has already been weel covered in SO.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank You for your help. –  niceApp Mar 29 '12 at 1:11

All you need is one single table.

create table Family
(
member_id,
parent_id references member_id,
level, --not strictly necessary, but may save you time later
any_other_column

) 

Oracle:

select 
    lpad(' ',2*(level-1)) || to_char(member_id) s

from 
    Family

start with parent_id is null
connect by prior member_id = parent_id ;

SQL Server:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186243.aspx

Recommended reading:

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work, because I can't make it in one table. I need to have atleast the same number of table. I need the stored procedure that create the relationship while inserting the records. –  niceApp Aug 15 '10 at 0:50
    
SQL Server 2008 also has a HierarchyId type for this. –  Martin Smith Aug 15 '10 at 0:53

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