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It is widely accepted that Open Source also means free of charge. In particular, the "Open Source" definition by the Open Source Initiative states that Open Source, in addition to access to the source code and other criteria, means free redistribution. Their given rationale is:

By constraining the license to require free redistribution, we eliminate the temptation to throw away many long-term gains in order to make a few short-term sales dollars. If we didn't do this, there would be lots of pressure for cooperators to defect.

I don't understand what they mean by this "temptation" and "pressure".

Can someone elaborate or provide an example of why is Open Source software expected to be free?

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closed as off topic by Pascal Thivent, dmckee, kiamlaluno, gnovice, danben Aug 15 '10 at 14:28

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Contact them and ask. Seems unwise to be commenting on other peoples motives; ask them directly. –  Noon Silk Aug 15 '10 at 1:33
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I (also) don't understand why this question is being considered off-topic. I can't think of a better place to ask it than stackoverflow! –  hpique Aug 15 '10 at 1:34
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@hgpc: Then you need to expand your thinking abilities. –  Noon Silk Aug 15 '10 at 1:35
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@silky Not asking about the Open Source Initiative motives. I'm asking for a clarification of an aspect of a widely used software concept. –  hpique Aug 15 '10 at 1:36
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@hgpc: No you're not. You linked a document on some website and asked for clarification about a point. I see no reason not to ask the website directly. –  Noon Silk Aug 15 '10 at 1:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If there were no restrictions requiring free distribution, imagine the following scenario:

You are a coder working on an open-source project. One night, you have a brilliant idea. It's a wonderful way to improve the project to do something incredible it's never done before.

You spend fifty hours writing code. When you're done, you take a look at your new product, built on untold thousands of man-hours of others' work, and realize that people would pay for your version. Maybe even pay huge sums of money. It's that good.

What do you do now? Do you charge for a forked version of the original? Or do you give away all the effort you just put into changing the work of others for free?

It's hard to say "no" to money. So the temptation is removed by requiring that you contribute your changes back to the community for free - that way, everyone gains in the long run, but you personally lose the "short-term sales dollars" (to quote the excerpt you posted) for being the first to have an idea.

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@Borealid, actually, you could perfectly well fork-and-modify, to resell as closed source, if the project's license was BSD, Apache, and so forth; OSI was created specifically to form a framework for such "liberal" licenses, which allow license changes on derived works, not just the FSF's GPL (which would indeed impede the scenario, since it mandates that derived works be licensed exactly the same way) and other such "share-alike" licenses. –  Alex Martelli Aug 15 '10 at 1:38
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@Borealid, I didn't downvote either, just commented explaining why I think your answer is wrong (would be right for GPL &c, but it's not right for the wider church of OSI). –  Alex Martelli Aug 15 '10 at 1:39
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I'd feel stupid anytime I'd expend any effort to help anyone with anything, I'm glad I don't answer questions on SO. (yes, I'm poking fun at Crashworks, but with good-natured intent). –  msw Aug 15 '10 at 2:13
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@Borealid, under BSD etc, you can perfectly well make money off a derived work of other people's BSD-licensed product -- you need not license the derived work under the same terms as the one you're deriving from, and in particular you need not make it open-source and need not permit free legal redistribution. If people pick BSD &c rather than GPL because they think like you do, they're truly making a terrible mistake. Face it: with BSD, it is perfectly possible that somebody else will get rich off your unpaid work on the product. –  Alex Martelli Aug 15 '10 at 3:24
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@Crashworks: A non-altruistic for-profit company would be reluctant to develop open-source software only if their profit model is selling that software itself. Random examples: Google pays programmers to work on Subversion not out of altruism but because they simply need some improvements; Pixar once sponsored some development to GNOME because they needed a feature—they have no interest in selling software—and Mozilla, Red Hat and Canonical are companies developing open-source software for profit. See also Joel Spolsky's article. –  ShreevatsaR Aug 15 '10 at 4:56

There's nothing with Open Source that says you can't also charge a fee for distribution, or even support or something like that. The goal is to keep the source available for everyone to use, learn from, and otherwise keep in the public interest.

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Actually, under the GPL, you can only charge reasonable distribution costs. You can't arbitrarily price the source code separately from the program. And, once you've sent someone a copy of your source, they are free to undercut you and give it away for free. So, effectively, you can't make money charging for distribution. –  Borealid Aug 15 '10 at 1:38
    
@Borealid: "Open Source" doesn't = GPL. You may as well state that just because some cars are red you can't ever have a blue car. –  Noon Silk Aug 15 '10 at 1:47
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@Borealid, I never said anything about charging for the code. Charging for distribution is perfectly allowed in the GPL, and charging for application support, etc., is done by many folks, including big names like Redhat. –  jer Aug 15 '10 at 3:48

The value in software development is the service provided by the developers to update and maintain the software. If you want to profit from the creation of open-source software, you can either:

Find someone to pay you to extend or create open-source software:

  • A company that backs the open-source software directly (e.g. RedHat, Mozilla)
  • A company that is building on top of the open-source software (e.g. a software company that wants to add features to an IDE)
  • Write or extend some open source software for your own benefit, advertise and write about it before releasing it, then have people in the community donate money towards you releasing it (called "ransoming" or "assurance contracting")

Find someone to pay you to provide services on top of open-source software:

  • Write articles, tutorials, screencasts
  • Consulting services
  • Support
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It is widely accepted that Open Source also means free of charge.

And this is inaccurate. Just because people think something is so, doesn't make it so. Open source means "free" as in "freedom," not "free as in beer". This is an extremely common analogy made about open source software.

In particular, the "Open Source" definition by the Open Source Initiative states that Open Source, in addition to access to the source code and other criteria, means free redistribution.

Free redistribution does not mean free distribution. You can charge a fee in many of the licenses they have approved. It means whoever gets a copy of your program has licensed it in such a way that they are not allowed to then make money off your product.

I don't understand what they mean by this "temptation" and "pressure".

Temptation is referring to the fact that making money is tempting. Making money off work that you have done is tempting. However, open source is based off a cooperation, and is an agreement that all of us benefit. This is the concept behind the public domain, as well, something which has been backed by law for a very long time.

Pressure refers to the fact that if some people make money, others will be tempted to make money as well. Another problem is that people who are making money put pressure on open source advocates and contributors to abandon the open source model. For example, many companies release marketing material and give interviews stating that the open source model is dangerous (patent infringement concerns), bad long term, failing, bad for customers, not any cheaper, etc. This is commonly referred to as spreading FUD (fear, uncertainty, doubt).

Can someone elaborate or provide an example of why is Open Source software expected to be free?

Why? That is up to the decisions of the people who will distribute software by the license, or contribute to open source projects. See my example of the public domain, and potentially read up on the history and rationale behind it.

If you mean how it is enforced, read some of the licenses. If you do not understand them, and have a business reason to consider open source, hire a lawyer practiced in software licensing. Lawyers can be hired to enforce it, as well.

This person is a well known open source advocate, who also has become rich off of proprietary software. His business model has worked very well:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_D._Carmack#Free_software

Part of his strategy was to use dual licensing. This is not something that your question mentioned, and could potentially be a boon to business.

If you want a different model of redistributing source code, check out Microsoft's Shared Source.

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I think cooperators has the meaning explained in The Political Economy of Open Source Software. Simply put, the cooperators are the people contributing to any particular open source project. My explanation here is not from the document so corrections are welcome.

By constraining the license to require free redistribution, we eliminate the temptation to throw away many long-term gains in order to make a few short-term sales dollars. If we didn't do this, there would be lots of pressure for cooperators to defect.

The options considered for an open source license were either free redistribution or non-free redistribution. In the second case, "short-term sales dollars" will be gained by the original distributer. However, let us see what is the effect on the open source project.

To have a successful large scale open source project, a lot of cooperators are needed. If a particular cooperator, let's call him X, does not have the right to distribute the project code coupled with his modifications then he is less likely to contribute. Also, the reachability of the project will be a lot less. This will affect the reputation of X, which is probably as important to him as it is to a lot of open source contributors. Again, a good incentive for X to contribute to open source is that he needs this particular software. His future is more insured by his ability to fork the project if needs be. But he can't if redistribution is not free.

All in all, suddenly the incentives for X to contribute are greatly diminished while the risks grow. As the economy of open source projects goes south, he is likely to defect, in the sense of leaving the open source ecosystem.

The end result is that open source projects would not be sustainable beyond a certain scale of community if the license allows non-free distribution. In essense, many long-term gains will be lost.

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