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I am trying to figure out how to use recursion in programs. I understand how recursion works in classical examples like "factorial", but am not sure how to apply it on my own...

I am starting out with converting an iterative bubble sort code into a recursive code... I have searched over the net for the same.... but am not able to find a convincing solution/explanation..

Example iterative code for bubble sort is:

arr[n]-> array with elements (1..n) which is to be sorted

for(i:1 to n)  
    for(j:1 to n-1)  
      if(arr[j+1]>arr[j])  
         swap(arr[j+1],arr[j]);

Would feel helpful if someone could give a hint about how to go about...

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2  
Can you explain why you want to make bubble sort recursive? Doesn't seem like a good idea... –  Zach Scrivena Aug 15 '10 at 6:35
    
IMHO recursion is really not useful for bubble sort (to increase its readability or performance). Basically you would just change the first for into a recursion. RecBSort(arr, i) { ...; RecBSort(arr, i++)}. Which is pretty useless. –  Jaroslav Jandek Aug 15 '10 at 6:36
    
i just want to try out converting "any" known iteration-based code into an equivalent recursive code, to understand recursion better... bubble sort came first to my mind as a classical example of iteration-based code... no other specific reason for choosing bubble-sort... –  goalseeker29 Aug 15 '10 at 7:31
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6 Answers

I am not sure whether Bubblesort is a good algorithm to practice recursion on. It would be quite ugly to convert it to recursion because it's a nested cycle. It would look something like this:

function pass(i,j,n,arr)
{
  if(arr[i]>arr(j))
    swap(arr[i],arr[j]);

  if(j==n)
  {
    j=0;
    i=i+1;
  }
  if(i==n+1)
    return arr;

  return pass(i,j+1,n,arr);
}

It's the same for loop, only longer to define, using a lot more memory.

You should instead try to implement QuickSort. It needs recursion, and it's a lot faster in most cases than BubbleSort. Most platforms implemented it already, so you don't have to write it yourself, but it's good to know how it works, and it helps understand recursion.

If you want you might also try to solve this problem using recursion:
You have a table NxM of numbers, and a starting coordinate (position). It's a ^travellers^ position. The traveller can travel to an adjacent cell (right, left, up or down) which has a smaller number than the one he's on. You must write a program that computes the longest path the traveller can pass under these constraints. Use random to generate the array, or generate it manually.

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Well, quicksort has a very natural expression in recursion, but it doesn't "need" it. You never "need" recursion, its just that sometimes it is the clear way to write something. –  dmckee Aug 15 '10 at 6:42
    
Well yeah, that's what I meant. –  AlexanderMP Aug 15 '10 at 6:46
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Recursion is a design technique based on inductive proofs. Considers one or more base (simple) case(s) for your problem, and one or more ways to move the problem closer to being a base-case problem. Then, at each step of the algorithm, you either recognize completion (and deal appropriately with a base case) make the problem slightly closer to being a base case.

Bubble sort is just an application of the observation that a sorted array has all adjacent pairs of elements in order. Defined recursively, it works like:

  1. Base case: There's an array of size 1 (or less) to sort. It's sorted, of course.
  2. Inductive case: Bubble the largest element to the top of the array. Now there's a one-element smaller array to sort, which do.

You can write that very idea in the programming language of your choice, and you get bubble sort. Oh, but you have to define what it means to "bubble the largest element". Well, that's another opportunity for recursive design. I think you get the idea, though.

Faster sorts are mostly based on observations about how you get closer to the goal in less work. Quick sort, for instance, relies on the notion that, if an array is sorted, then there is some element P, and all elements less than P are to P's left, and all elements more than P are to P's right. If you can establish that property on an array, and also pick P, then you can cut the problem roughly in half at each step instead of simply by one.

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+1 on "Bubble sort is just an application of the observation that a sorted array has all adjacent pairs of elements in order". Very well thought, never stopped to think about this before :-) –  Oeufcoque Penteano Dec 2 '13 at 4:14
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public void sort(int[] arr, int first, int last){

    if(first < last && last > 0){
        if(arr[first] > arr[first+1]){
            int temp = arr[first];
            arr[first] = arr[first+1];
            arr[first+1] = temp;
        }
        sort(arr, first+1, last);
        sort(arr, first, last-1);
    }
    else
        return;
}

Late for 2 years, but maybe it will useful to someone

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Dear VadimFromUa, it's completely OK to answer the old questions cuz over 2500 users have watched this and it's useful for others. –  Sam Rad Dec 19 '12 at 22:46
    
Thank you very much, 3 years later, and your answer is still useful. Will be using your algorithm for a 2nd semester class of 30 students today :-) –  Oeufcoque Penteano Dec 2 '13 at 4:13
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Because I found this question as one of the first examples, I would like to provide an other way to do the recursion, without additional arguments:

function bubblesort (input: some integer array):
  if input is empty:
    return input
  else:
    do one bubble sort run for input
    subarray = bubblesort(unsorted part of input)
    return subarray append sorted part of input

In this way, we will sort the whole array piecewise for each call.

Why does it work? Because every bubble sort run, we will put at least the largest element to the rightmost index.
We know that all elements until the last swap are in unknown state, all after the last swap are sorted.

Implementations in Java (array/list argument-modifying/not) could be found there: http://codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/24006/recursive-bubble-sort-in-java/24133#24133

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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void sort(int *arr, int first, int last){

    if(first < last && last > 0){
        if(arr[first] > arr[first+1]){
            int temp = arr[first];
            arr[first] = arr[first+1];
            arr[first+1] = temp;
        }
        sort(arr, first+1, last);
        sort(arr, first, last-1);
    }
    else
        return;
}
int main(void) {

    int data [] = { 3, 5 , 6, 2, 1, 10, 4};
    int len = sizeof(data)/sizeof(int);
    int i = 0;
    sort(data,0,len-1);
    for(i=0;i<len;i++)
        printf("%d ",data[i]);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
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Here's my answer. It's essentially the same as VladimFromUa's answer (a recursive variant of bubble sort) but instead of doing a fixed number of runs, additional runs are only performed if it's detected that the array was reordered on the previous run.

Another couple of differences are below:

1.The parameter indexing the starting point in the array has been dropped by offsetting the address of the array in recursive calls. 2.The check "if(first < last && last > 0)" in Vlad's or "if (--p_length == 1)" in my code is better performed before the recursive call that would result in the array length being 1, since it is one less call on the stack.

I added some code to read the input from the command line and print both the unsorted and sorted arrays, for convenience.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <assert.h>

typedef enum { FALSE, TRUE } boolean_t;

void
swap_int(int *a, int *b) {

    int temp = *a;

    *a = *b;
    *b = temp;
}

boolean_t
sort_array(int p_array[], int p_length) {

    boolean_t result;

    if (p_array[0] > p_array[1]) {
        swap_int(p_array, p_array + 1);
        result = TRUE;
    } else {
        result = FALSE;
    }

    if (--p_length == 1) {
        return result;
    }

    result |= sort_array(p_array + 1, p_length);

    if (result) {
        sort_array(p_array, p_length);
    }

    return result;
}

void
print_array_int(int p_array[], int p_length) {

    int n;

    for (n = 0; n < p_length - 1; n++) {
        printf("%d, ", p_array[n]);
    }

    printf("%d\n", p_array[n]);
}

int
main(int argc, char **argv) {

    int *array;
    int array_length = argc - 1;
    int n;

    array = malloc(array_length * sizeof(*array));

    for (n = 0; n < array_length; n++) {
        sscanf(argv[n + 1], "%d", array + n);
    }

    printf("\nUnsorted array:\n");
    print_array_int(array, array_length);
    sort_array(array, array_length);
    printf("\nSorted array:\n");
    print_array_int(array, array_length);

return 0;
}
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