Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My code is segfaulting. I can't understand why. It might have to do with the "fermatPrimeTest()" function I made.

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <cstdlib>
#include "fib.h"
using namespace std;

bool fermatPrimeTest( unsigned long int p )
{
  if ( p % 2 == 0 ) { // if even
    return false;
  } 
  else if ( p == 1 || p == 2 || p == 3 ) { // if 1, 2, or 3
    return true;
  }
  unsigned long a = 2 ; // just give it an initial value, make it happy
  for ( int i=0 ; i < 3 ; i++) {
    if (GCD(a, p-1) != 1) {
      a = rand() % (p-1) + 1;
    }
    // cout << "a=" << a << " ,p=" << p << GCD(a, p-1) << endl;
  }
  return true;
}

int GCD(unsigned long int a, unsigned long int b) {
  while( 1 ) {
    a = a % b;
    if( a == 0 )
      return b;
      // cout << "GCD-b=" << b << ", GCD-a=" << a << endl;

    b = b % a;

    if( b == 0 )
      return a;
      // cout << "GCD-a=" << a << ", GCD-b=" << b << endl;
  }
}

// fills array with Fibonacci primes
// returns number of primes
unsigned long findFibonacciPrimes (unsigned long lowerBound,
                                   unsigned long upperBound,
                                   unsigned long result[])
{  
  int i = 0;  //counter
  unsigned long maxElements = upperBound - lowerBound + 1;  // there can be no more array elements than this

  /*
  The array result is guaranteed to have enough space to store all the numbers found. 
  Your program will crash if it attempts to write past the end of the array, and no 
  marks will be awarded for any tests in which this occurs. You are also guaranteed that 
  1 < lowerBound < upperBound < 3,000,000,000.
  Every F_n that is prime has a prime  index n, with the exception of F_4=3. 
  However, the converse is not true (i.e., not every prime index p gives a prime F_p). 
  */

  unsigned long int one = 0, two = 1, three = one + two;   // element x-2, x-1, and x for Fib sequence
  result[i++] = 0;
  result[i++] = 1;

 while ( lowerBound < three < upperBound ) {
    if ( fermatPrimeTest(three) ) {
      result[i++] = three;
    }
    one = two;
    two = three;
    three = one + two;
  }
  return sizeof result / sizeof result[0];   // return size of array TODO!
}
int main() {
  unsigned long result[100];
  findFibonacciPrimes(1,100,result);
}
share|improve this question
2  
Don't make people go to another site. –  GManNickG Aug 15 '10 at 6:39
1  
Why don't you use a vector instead, seems safer. –  Claptrap Aug 15 '10 at 6:46
3  
FYI: 1 is not prime. –  Thomas Aug 15 '10 at 6:48
    
I thought definition of prime is a number that is divisible by no other number, except for 1 and itself. In this case 1 isn't divisible by any number, except for itself and 1. –  Felipe Alvarez Aug 15 '10 at 10:50
    
A prime number is a positive integer having exactly one positive divisor other than 1 (mathworld.wolfram.com/PrimeNumber.html). –  jon-hanson Aug 15 '10 at 11:48
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

Line 67:

 while ( lowerBound < three < upperBound ) {

Many languages do not support chained comparison like this correctly. You need to write this instead:

 while ( lowerBound < three && three < upperBound ) {

In C++, lowerBound < three < upperBound is interpreted as (lowerBound < three) < upperBound. The expression lowerBound < three will always result in 0 (false) or 1 (true), so this while loop will always succeed since upperBound is 100.

This causes the line result[i++] = three; to be run over 100 times since there are over 100 Fibonacci primes. But the size of result is only 100. When i ≥ 100, the program will be writing to invalid memory region, and this causes the Segmentation Fault.


As Andres said in the comment, you'd better use a vector, e.g.

#include <vector>
...
std::vector<unsigned long> findFibonacciPrimes(unsigned long lowerBound,
                                               unsigned long upperBound) {
   std::vector<unsigned long> result;
   result.push_back(0);
   result.push_back(1);  // note that 0 and 1 aren't primes.
   ...
   while (lowerBound < three && three < upperBound ) {
      if ( fermatPrimeTest(three) ) {
        result.push_back(three);
      ...
   return result;
}

int main () {
   std::vector<unsigned long> result = findFibonacciPrimes(1, 100);
   // use result.size() to get the number of items in the vector.
   // use result[i]     to get the i-th item.
}
share|improve this answer
2  
@NullUser on deleted answer, it does compile. It is the same as (lowerBound < three) < upperBound. We get a boolean b from lowerBound < three, giving b < upperBound. b will be promoted to an integer via b ? 1 : 0, giving either 1 < upperBound or 0 < upperBound. –  GManNickG Aug 15 '10 at 6:42
    
Haha, funny mistake this one! –  Blindy Aug 15 '10 at 6:58
    
Going to stick to arrays for this one. We haven't covered vectors yet. –  Felipe Alvarez Aug 15 '10 at 10:53
add comment

I see lots of potential bugs.

Here's the bug causing your crash:

Given your main loop:

 while ( lowerBound < three < upperBound ) {
    if ( fermatPrimeTest(three) ) {
      result[i++] = three;
    }
    one = two;
    two = three;
    three = one + two;
  }

I think you really should say this to protect your array length independent of your algorithm stopping.

 while ((i < maxElements) && (lowerBound < three) && (three < upperBound)) {
    if ( fermatPrimeTest(three) ) {
      result[i++] = three;
    }
    one = two;
    two = three;
    three = one + two;
  }

Now for the rest of my critique: Given this line:

return sizeof result / sizeof result[0];   // return size of array TODO!

sizeof(result) will always return 4 (or 8 on a 64-bit compile) because you are calculating the size of a pointer instead of the sizeof for a static array. The compiler has no idea that this pointer is really a staticly sized array.

You likely want to say:

return i;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.