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Assume that i have written a program in C++ without using RTTI and run-time polymorphism (no virtual function, no virtual inheritance) and classes don't have private/protected members, also the C++ specific header files are not used (i.e. C header files are used: cstring, cstdio, ... instead of string, iostream, ...).

Then i want to write a similar program in C which the first argument type of the functions are corresponded to the related struct.

For example:

//C++ code

struct Custom
{
    int a;
    Custom() { }
    void change() { }
    ~Custom() { }
};

int main()
{
    Custom m; //init m
    m.change();
    //destroy m
}

/*C code*/

struct Custom
{
    int a;
};
void custom_init(Custom* like_this) { }
void custom_change(Custom* like_this) { }
void custom_destroy(Custom* like_this) { }

int main()
{
    Custom m;
    custom_init(&m);
    custom_change(&m);
    custom_destroy(&m);
}

Is the C++ program slower than the similar C program (Generally)? if yes, why C programs are faster then? I know, C++ uses the RAII design pattern for memory management, is it the reason for the slow?

I heard that some people said the C programs is faster... why?

Edit: Why this question is closed? i wanted to know if c++ does something additionally which we don't need, and how it affects the performance (makes it slower? faster? or nothing?).

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closed as not a real question by Henk Holterman, Hans Passant, jk., George Johnston, Gregory Pakosz Aug 15 '10 at 12:19

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Answer would depend on compiler/platform/hardware. Just compile both programs, benchmark. Also, in some cases, chances of accidentally causing screwup may not be worth extra speed. –  SigTerm Aug 15 '10 at 12:16
6  
Don't close. Don't get offended everytime something is compared to C. I'd for one like to know if there's any situations where this is the case. –  Matt Joiner Aug 15 '10 at 12:18
2  
Actually for such a short-lived program the fact that the C++ runtime library is bigger than the C library, the C++ program is likely to be somewhat slower. I must admit I find funny to talk about ineffectiveness and RAII, RAII doesn't affect performance, it affects correctness. –  Matthieu M. Aug 15 '10 at 12:55
2  
@PC2st: Your c code achieves the same goal as RAII would, resource management. If you have to initialize an object or clean up after you used it, you write a ctor/dtor in c++ and init/destroy methods in c and call them. c++ makes resource management implicit by calling the constructor and destructor functions every time an object is created or destroyed. Using c does not remove the need for resource management, so the c code will have to do the same as the c++ code only with explicit calls to init and destroy. –  josefx Aug 15 '10 at 13:53
1  
A skilled worker might be able to work faster by using equipment without any interlocks, guards, or other safety gear (at least until he maims himself) but the protection such gear provides is generally more than worth the slight hassle it imposes. Occasionally it will be impractical to do a task with all the normal safety gear; such situations must be handled very carefully when they're necessary, and are often best avoided, but sometimes bypassing the safety gear really is the best approach. C++ is C with extra safety gear; even if bypassed, it adds some weight, but it's generally useful. –  supercat Aug 15 '10 at 15:09
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

C++ doesn't use RAII. You CAN use RAII in your c++ program.
As long as you are doing exactly the same thing in C++ and in C, both program should be exactly as fast.
Writing fast programs in C or C++ is not a matter of programming language but of what kind of feature you use.

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1  
If we don't use pointers, such as m variable in the above example, C++ uses RAII to allocate and free its memory (when an error occurred in the constructor, the allocated memory will be freed) (and if an error is occurred after class initialization, the destructor will be called automatically). –  ccsadegh Aug 15 '10 at 13:22
1  
@PC2st Just because it works LIKE RAII does not mean it IS RAII. –  SoapBox Aug 15 '10 at 13:55
1  
@PC2st When you say if an error occurs, you mean if an exception is thrown right ? It means that you're using an extra feature you wouldn't have used in C. If you want the comparison to be meaningful you must either do not use exception, either implement exception handling in C. –  log0 Aug 15 '10 at 14:59
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You'll never know until you try. If the C++ uses anything that C does not (such as constructors, destructors and even non-virtual methods), it may be slower.

But the difference will probably be so small as to be unnoticeable.

Early implementations of C++ may have been slower than C but that's the nature of any software. It improves with time.

Measure, don't guess! Profile your specific code to see which is faster. But even if C code is faster, the price of losing all that extra functionality may be too much. Execution speed is only one speed, and rarely the important one. My opinion of which speed is the most important is development speed.

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Thanks for your answer, but i want to know if c++ do something additionally which we don't need, and how it affects the performance (makes it slower? or nothing?). for example, RAII does what that makes C++ slower? (or may not) and other things that may C++ does to make it slower than C (or may not). –  ccsadegh Aug 15 '10 at 13:22
    
@PC2st, if you want to know that, then test that. It will depend on the implementation. I could quite easily write a C compiler that generates code slower than g++ (that's actually likely since, based on the assembler output, the g++ guys are much more knowledgeable about optimisation than I). Crikey, I could write a C compiler whose code ran slower than GWBASIC :-) Unless you start comparing specific implementations (so that actual data can be gathered rather than people's anecdotes), the question seems meaningless. –  paxdiablo Aug 15 '10 at 14:01
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No, it's almost certainly false. RAII by itself will not make the program slower. Both C and C++ compilers would probably generate almost identical code for these examples.

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