Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question is coded in pseudo-PHP, but I really don't mind what language I get answers in (except for Ruby :-P), as this is purely hypothetical. In fact, PHP is quite possibly the worst language to be doing this type of logic in. Unfortunately, I have never done this before, so I can't provide a real-world example. Therefore, hypothetical answers are completely acceptable.

Basically, I have lots of objects performing a task. For this example, let's say each object is a class that downloads a file from the Internet. Each object will be downloading a different file, and the downloads are run in parallel. Obviously, some objects may finish downloading before others. The actual grabbing of data may run in threads, but that is not relevant to this question.

So we can define the object as such:

class DownloaderObject() {
    var $url = '';
    var $downloading = false;

    function DownloaderObject($v){ // constructor
        $this->url = $v;
        start_downloading_in_the_background(url=$this->$url, callback=$this->finished);
        $this->downloading = true;
    }

    function finished() {
        save_the_data_somewhere();
        $this->downloading = false;
        $this->destroy(); // actually destroys the object
    }
}

Okay, so we have lots of these objects running:

$download1 = new DownloaderObject('http://somesite.com/latest_windows.iso');
$download2 = new DownloaderObject('http://somesite.com/kitchen_sink.iso');
$download3 = new DownloaderObject('http://somesite.com/heroes_part_1.rar');

And we can store them in an array:

$downloads = array($download1, $download2, $download3);

So we have an array full of the downloads:

array(
  1 => $download1,
  2 => $download2,
  3 => $download3
)

And we can iterate through them like this:

print('Here are the downloads that are running:');
foreach ($downloads as $d) {
    print($d->url . "\n");
}

Okay, now suppose download 2 finishes, and the object is destroyed. Now we should have two objects in the array:

array(
  1 => $download1,
  3 => $download3
)

But there is a hole in the array! Key #2 is being unused. Also, if I wanted to start a new download, it is unclear where to insert the download into the array. The following could work:

$i = 0;
while ($i < count($downloads) - 1) {
    if (!is_object($downloads[$i])) {
        $downloads[$i] = new DownloaderObject('http://somesite.com/doctorwho.iso');
        break;
    }
    $i++;
}

However, that is terribly inefficient (and while $i++ loops are nooby). So, another approach is to keep a counter.

function add_download($url) {
    global $downloads;
    static $download_counter;

    $download_counter++;
    $downloads[$download_counter] = new DownloaderObject($url);
}

That would work, but we still get holes in the array:

array(
  1  => DownloaderObject,
  3  => DownloaderObject,
  7  => DownloaderObject,
  13 => DownloaderObject
)

That's ugly. However, is that acceptable? Should the array be "defragmented", i.e. the keys rearranged to eliminate blank spaces?

Or is there another programmatic structure I should be aware of? I want a structure that I can add stuff to, remove stuff from, refer to keys in a variable, iterate through, etc., that is not an array. Does such a thing exist?

I have been coding for years, but this question has bugged me for very many of those years, and I am still not aware of an answer. This may be obvious to some programmers, but is extremely non-trivial to me.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

The problem with PHP's "associative arrays" is that they aren't arrays at all, they're Hashmaps. Having holes there is perfectly fine. You might look at a linked list, as well, but a Hashmap seems perfectly suited to what you're doing.

share|improve this answer
    
Today, I used a linked list in an C application I wrote, and they're very awesome. Thanks! :) –  Jeremy Visser Aug 22 '09 at 8:15

What is maintaining your array of downloaders?

If you encapsulate the array in a class that is notified by the downloader when it is finished you won't have to worry about stale references to destroyed objects.

This class can manage the organisation of the array internally and present an interface to its users that looks more like an iterator than an array.

share|improve this answer

"$i++ loops" are nooby, but only because the code becomes much clearer if you use a for loop:

$i = 0;
while ($i < count($downloads) - 1) {
    if (!is_object($downloads[$i])) {
       $downloads[$i] = new DownloaderObject('http://somesite.com/doctorwho.iso');
        break;
    }
    $i++;
}

Becomes

for($i=0;$i<count($downloads)-1;++$i){
    if (!is_object($downloads[$i])) {
        $downloads[$i] = new DownloaderObject('http://somesite.com/doctorwho.iso');
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Yeah, I actually did know about for loops, but I can never remember the syntax, and it was really only for the example anyway. You can see that the code more or less runs the same way. –  Jeremy Visser Dec 9 '08 at 12:53

Coming from a C# perspective, my first thought would be that you need a different data structure to an array - you need to think about the problem using a higher-level data structure. Perhaps a Queue, List or Stack would suit your purposes better?

share|improve this answer
    
In PHP, there are arrays, and only arrays. –  eplawless Dec 8 '08 at 7:13
    
As I said, this question is abstract. The only reason I wrote the question in PHP is because that is what I'm mostly familiar with. If I were writing an app doing anything remotely similar to this, I'd probably want to learn Python to do it. –  Jeremy Visser Dec 9 '08 at 12:59
    
Queues look cool. From looking at the Wikipedia article on them, you push() onto it, and pop() them. Is there any way to iterate through them without pop()'ing them (and thus removing them from the queue)? –  Jeremy Visser Dec 9 '08 at 13:11
    
As a follow-up to this question, I have since been doing a lot of Python programming, and it looks like stacks are the correct paradigm for what I want to achieve. I have since used stacks in quite a few applications, and they are actually not all that complex to use. However, I have only used them in Python -- no idea how you would implement them in a language where they are not native (e.g. PHP). –  Jeremy Visser Jul 28 '09 at 13:12

The short answer to your question is that in PHP arrays are used for almost everything and you rarely end up using other data structures. Having holes in your array indexes isn't anything to worry about. In other programming languages such as Java you have a more diverse set of data structures to choose from: Sets, Hashes, Lists, Vectors and more. It seems that you would also need to have a closer interaction between the Array and DownloaderObject class. Just because the object $download2 has "destroyed()" itself the array will maintain a reference to that object.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Some good answers to this question, which reflect on the relative experience on the answerers. Thank you very much — they proved very educational.

I posted this question nearly three years ago. In hindsight, I can see my knowledge in that area was severely lacking. The biggest problem I had was that I was coming from a PHP perspective, which does not have the ability to arbitrarily pop elements. Something the other answers to this question helped me to discover was that a fundamentally superior model is 'linked lists'.

For C, I wrote a blog post about linked lists which contains code samples (too numerous to post here) but would neatly fill the original question's use case.

For PHP, a linked list implementation appears here, which I have never tried, but imagine it would also be the right way to deal with the above.

Interestingly, Python lists contain the pop() method which, unlike PHP's array_pop(), can pop arbitrary elements and keep everything in order. For example:

>>> x = ['baa', 'ram', 'ewe'] # our starting point
>>> x[1]                      # making sure element 1 is 'ram'
'ram'
>>> x.pop(1)                  # let's arbitrarily pop an element in the middle
'ram'
>>> x                         # the one we popped ('ram') is now gone
['baa', 'ewe']
>>> x[1]                      # and there are no holes: item 2 has become item 1
'ewe'
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.