Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How can I clone git repository with specific revision/changeset? Something like I usually do in Mercurial: hg clone -r 3 /path/to/repository

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 90 down vote accepted

If you don't want to fetch the full repository then you probably shouldn't be using clone. You can always just use fetch to choose the branch that you want to fetch. I'm not an hg expert so I don't know the details of -r but in git you can do something like this.

# make a new blank repository in the current directory
git init

# add a remote
git remote add origin url://to/source/repository

# fetch a commit (or branch or tag) of interest
# Note: the full history of this commit will be retrieved
git fetch origin <sha1-of-commit-of-interest>

# reset this repository's master branch to the commit of interest
git reset --hard FETCH_HEAD
share|improve this answer
17  
I don't think git fetch origin <sha1> works; it seems like you need to pass a named reference such as a tag or branch name. See kerneltrap.org/mailarchive/git/2009/1/13/4707444 – artur Sep 8 '11 at 14:05
26  
@artur: You don't think it works, or you've tried it and it doesn't work? – Charles Bailey Sep 8 '11 at 14:20
28  
With git 1.4, I found that I was able to use the git fetch origin <SHA1> to switch to any revision I wanted after I'd fetched the master from the remote and done the reset --hard to actual instantiate the branch locally. I was not able to fetch the individual revisions directly. With git 1.7, git fetch origin <SHA1> did not work, as reported by @artur; you need to use git checkout <SHA1> followed by a reset --hard. – Joe McMahon Oct 19 '11 at 18:54
11  
git fetch origin <sha1> doesn't work for me – Jake Aug 13 '13 at 23:17
8  
This answer is outdated. This doesn't work with git 1.7 nor git 1.8, neither with https:// nor ssh protocol. ("Couldn't find remote ref df44398762393c67af487edeb0831ad9579df4aa" – it isn't a ref, it is a commit.) – Paŭlo Ebermann Sep 8 '14 at 18:03
up vote 231 down vote
+50
$ git clone $URL
$ git reset --hard $SHA1

To again go back to the most recent commit

$ git pull
share|improve this answer
    
git clone github.com/respository/path – zero_cool Aug 2 '14 at 19:55
9  
Perfect solution. Easier to use and remember than all other. This should be an accepted answer. – trejder Oct 27 '14 at 11:44
2  
I scrolled down until I saw this fast and working solution. – BigDong Feb 26 '15 at 10:41
5  
This works only if the commit is in the master branch, if not it is gonna mess-up the local reference. Why git reset and not git checkout in the first place? – Joky May 9 '15 at 20:25
9  
This is not a good option for large repos, as it pulls everything. – Incognito Jul 19 '15 at 20:32

Cloning a git repository, aptly, clones the entire repository: there isn't a way to select only one revision to clone. However, once you perform git clone, you can checkout a specific revision by doing checkout <rev>.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't want to clone only one revision. I just want to specify the limit of cloning. Other words, I want to clone everything up to the specified revision. – John Aug 15 '10 at 20:53
3  
You can't do that. git clone grabs the whole repository. Once you have it, you can then checkout a specific revision. – user113292 Aug 15 '10 at 20:54
3  
In other words, John, that's not how Git works. – Amber Aug 15 '10 at 20:55
2  
Shame. But thank you guys! – John Aug 15 '10 at 20:57
3  
One thing to note; Git is generally pretty efficient about storing history, so it's not as if you'd save massive amounts of space by only cloning half the revisions. – Amber Aug 15 '10 at 20:58

If you mean you want to fetch everything from the beginning up to a particular point, Charles Bailey's answer is perfect. If you want to do the reverse and retrieve a subset of the history going back from the current date, you can use git clone --depth [N] where N is the number of revs of history you want. However:

--depth

Create a shallow clone with a history truncated to the specified number of revisions. A shallow repository has a number of limitations (you cannot clone or fetch from it, nor push from nor into it), but is adequate if you are only interested in the recent history of a large project with a long history, and would want to send in fixes as patches.

share|improve this answer
    
Newer version of git have improved shallow clones, and you can pull and push from it. – orion78fr Mar 21 at 17:42

Just to sum things up (git v. 1.7.2.1):

  1. do a regular git clone where you want the repo (gets everything to date — I know, not what is wanted, we're getting there)
  2. git checkout <sha1 rev> of the rev you want
  3. git reset --hard
  4. git checkout -b master
share|improve this answer
8  
Complains that master already exists in step 4 – a1an Sep 3 '12 at 14:39
4  
what do steps 3 and 4 do? – BrainSlugs83 Aug 28 '13 at 5:59
    
Step 4 didn't work for me, but up to step 3 did the trick - Thanks – gnB Apr 12 '15 at 23:21
    
@BrainSlugs83: Step 4 creates a local branch called master and switches to it. – LarsH Apr 26 at 13:35
    
@phill: Why the git reset --hard? The docs for that say "Resets the index and working tree. Any changes to tracked files in the working tree since <commit> [which defaults to HEAD, which is now <sha1 rev>] are discarded." But at this point we haven't made any changes since cloning, so what's the purpose? Does it truncate the current branch at <sha1 rev>? – LarsH Apr 26 at 13:43

TL;DR - Just create a tag in the source repository against the commit you want to clone up to and use the tag in the fetch command. You can delete the tag from the original repo later to clean up.

Well, its 2014 and it looks like Charles Bailey's accepted answer from 2010 is well and truly outdated by now and most (all?) of the other answers involve cloning, which many people are hoping to avoid.

The following solution achieves what the OP and many others are looking for, which is a way to create a copy of a repository, including history, but only up to a certain commit.

Here are the commands I used with git version 2.1.2 to clone a local repo (ie. a repository in another directory) up to a certain point:

# in the source repository, create a tag against the commit you want to check out
git tag -m "Temporary tag" tmptag <sha1>

# create a new directory and change into that directory
cd somewhere_else;mkdir newdir;cd newdir

# ...and create a new repository
git init

# add the source repository as a remote (this can be a URL or a directory)
git remote add origin /path/to/original/repo

# fetch the tag, which will include the entire repo and history up to that point
git fetch origin refs/tags/tmptag

# reset the head of the repository
git reset --hard FETCH_HEAD

# you can now change back to the original repository and remove the temporary tag
cd original_repo
git tag -d tmptag

Hopefully this solution keeps working for a few more years! :-)

share|improve this answer

Using 2 of the above answers (How to clone git repository with specific revision/changeset? and How to clone git repository with specific revision/changeset?) Helped me to come up with a definative. If you want to clone up to a point, then that point has to be a tag/branch not simply an SHA or the FETCH_HEAD gets confused. Following the git fetch set, if you use a branch or tag name, you get a response, if you simply use an SHA-1 you get not response.
Here's what I did:- create a full working clone of the full repo, from the actual origin

cd <path to create repo>
git clone git@<our gitlab server>:ui-developers/ui.git 

Then create a local branch, at the point that's interesting

git checkout 2050c8829c67f04b0db81e6247bb589c950afb14
git checkout -b origin_point

Then create my new blank repo, with my local copy as its origin

cd <path to create repo>
mkdir reduced-repo
cd reduced-repo
git init
git remote add local_copy <path to create repo>/ui
git fetch local_copy origin_point

At that point I got this response. I note it because if you use a SHA-1 in place of the branch above, nothing happens, so the response, means it worked

/var/www/html/ui-hacking$ git fetch local_copy origin_point
remote: Counting objects: 45493, done.
remote: Compressing objects: 100% (15928/15928), done.
remote: Total 45493 (delta 27508), reused 45387 (delta 27463)
Receiving objects: 100% (45493/45493), 53.64 MiB | 50.59 MiB/s, done.
Resolving deltas: 100% (27508/27508), done.
From /var/www/html/ui
 * branch            origin_point -> FETCH_HEAD
 * [new branch]      origin_point -> origin/origin_point

Now in my case, I then needed to put that back onto gitlab, as a fresh repo so I did

git remote add origin git@<our gitlab server>:ui-developers/new-ui.git

Which meant I could rebuild my repo from the origin_point by using git --git-dir=../ui/.git format-patch -k -1 --stdout <sha1> | git am -3 -k to cherry pick remotely then use git push origin to upload the whole lot back to its new home.

Hope that helps someone

share|improve this answer

You Can use simply git check <commit hash>

in this sequence

git clone URLTORepository

git checkout commithash

commit hash looks like this "45ef55ac20ce2389c9180658fdba35f4a663d204"

share|improve this answer
    
why do you need git init here? – Eve Freeman Apr 6 '14 at 6:29
    
in case you are starting from empty folder with no git initialized .. – M.Othman Apr 6 '14 at 8:41
    
clone initializes a folder for you – Eve Freeman Apr 6 '14 at 16:26
    
you r right ,, just edited the answer .. thanx :) – M.Othman Apr 6 '14 at 18:58
git clone -o <sha1-of-the-commit> <repository-url> <local-dir-name>

git uses the word origin in stead of popularly known revision

Following is a snippet from the manual $ git help clone

--origin <name>, -o <name>
    Instead of using the remote name origin to keep track of the upstream repository, use <name>.
share|improve this answer
    
No idea why you're getting downvoted here; this was exactly what I was hoping to see for my use case: Getting a particular version of the Linux kernel from a version they did not have the good sense to tag as a release (seems to be a problem with the RPi people), without downloading the whole multi-gigabyte history of Linux. Incidentally, it worked a treat. – Fordi Oct 26 '15 at 23:37
    
@Fordi The answerer has clearly misunderstood the meaning of "origin" completely. With or without the -o, you get the full 1.3G of Linux history (which is around twice the size of the actual working copy). – Emil Styrke Oct 27 '15 at 11:13
    
Er. When I say, "it worked a treat", I mean it did what was on the tin. Combined with the nominal --depth=1 to limit the set of revisions I get, i got a 150M download, at the revision I requested. Is it not supposed to do that? Should I file a bug report? – Fordi Oct 27 '15 at 14:41
1  
--depth=1 is not mentioned in the answer, so why would you say this answer worked if you added more things that aren't mentioned here? I'm happy it worked out for you, but this answer is misleading and doesn't answer the question even in part. Hence the downvotes. – Emil Styrke Oct 28 '15 at 7:29
2  
@Fordi: I just did git clone -o 896066ee1cf4d653057dac4e952f49c96ad16fa7 https://github.com/torvalds/linux.git linux --depth=1. This gives me revision 8a28d674 and not 896066ee as you and this answer claims. – Emil Styrke Oct 30 '15 at 9:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.