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I have a small app which automatically creates necessary SQL Server Alias entries for some servers. The bulk of the code looks like this:

        private static void SetAlias(string aliasName, string server, string protocol, int? port)
        {
            var scope = new ManagementScope(@"\\.\root\Microsoft\SqlServer\ComputerManagement10");
            try
            {
                scope.Connect();

            }
            catch
            {
                scope = new ManagementScope(@"\\.\root\Microsoft\SqlServer\ComputerManagement");
            }
            var clientAlias = new ManagementClass(scope, new ManagementPath("SqlServerAlias"), null);
            clientAlias.Get();

            foreach (ManagementObject existingAlias in clientAlias.GetInstances())
            {
                existingAlias.Get();
                if (String.Equals((String)existingAlias.GetPropertyValue("AliasName"), aliasName))
                {
                    UpdateAlias(existingAlias, aliasName, server, protocol, port);
                    return;
                }
            }

            // create new
            ManagementObject newAlias = clientAlias.CreateInstance();
            UpdateAlias(newAlias, aliasName, server, protocol, port);
            newAlias.Put();
        }

        private static void UpdateAlias(ManagementObject alias, string aliasName, string server, string protocol, int? port)
        {
            alias.SetPropertyValue("AliasName", aliasName);
            alias.SetPropertyValue("ServerName", server);
            alias.SetPropertyValue("ProtocolName", protocol);
            alias.SetPropertyValue("ConnectionString", port != null ? port.ToString() : string.Empty);
        }

This correctly creates the entries I want on 32bit OS's, however on x64 OS's I need the aliases also added to the 64 bit SQL Server Client Configuration.

Any ideas how to do this?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'll leave the registry answer in place since it's viable, but you can use the Context on the ConnectionOptions to specify the arch (an int, 32 or 64)

A sample accessing both from 64-bit:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var options = new ConnectionOptions();

        if (Environment.Is64BitOperatingSystem && Environment.Is64BitProcess == false)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Please build as AnyCPU or x64");
            return;
        }

        // default behavior, should be 64-bit WMI provider
        Console.WriteLine("Print 64-bit aliases");
        PrintAliases(options);

        // specify the 32-bit arch
        Console.WriteLine("Print 32-bit aliases");
        options.Context.Add("__ProviderArchitecture", 32);
        PrintAliases(options);
    }

    private static void PrintAliases(ConnectionOptions options)
    {
        var scope = new ManagementScope(@"\\.\root\Microsoft\SqlServer\ComputerManagement10", options);
        try
        {
            scope.Connect();
        }
        catch
        {
            scope = new ManagementScope(@"\\.\root\Microsoft\SqlServer\ComputerManagement");
        }
        var clientAlias = new ManagementClass(scope, new ManagementPath("SqlServerAlias"), null);
        clientAlias.Get();

        foreach (ManagementObject existingAlias in clientAlias.GetInstances())
        {
            existingAlias.Get();
            var propertiesToRead = new[] { "AliasName", "ServerName", "ProtocolName", "ConnectionString" };
            foreach (var propertyToRead  in propertiesToRead)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Property {0} = {1}", propertyToRead, existingAlias.GetPropertyValue(propertyToRead));
            }
        }
    }

A sample accessing both from 32-bit (NOTE: could just force the arch to 32 and 64 regardless of process bitness, of course)

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var options = new ConnectionOptions();

        if (Environment.Is64BitProcess)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Please run this sample as 32-bit");
            return;
        }

        // default behavior, should be 32-bit WMI provider since we build as x86
        Console.WriteLine("Print 32-bit aliases");
        PrintAliases(options);

        // also prints 32-bit aliases
        options.Context.Add("__ProviderArchitecture", 32);
        PrintAliases(options);

        // specify the 64-bit arch
        if (Environment.Is64BitOperatingSystem)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Print 64-bit aliases");
            options.Context.Add("__ProviderArchitecture", 64);
            PrintAliases(options);
        }
    }

    private static void PrintAliases(ConnectionOptions options)
    {
        var scope = new ManagementScope(@"\\.\root\Microsoft\SqlServer\ComputerManagement10", options);
        try
        {
            scope.Connect();
        }
        catch
        {
            scope = new ManagementScope(@"\\.\root\Microsoft\SqlServer\ComputerManagement");
        }
        var clientAlias = new ManagementClass(scope, new ManagementPath("SqlServerAlias"), null);
        clientAlias.Get();

        foreach (ManagementObject existingAlias in clientAlias.GetInstances())
        {
            existingAlias.Get();
            var propertiesToRead = new[] { "AliasName", "ServerName", "ProtocolName", "ConnectionString" };
            foreach (var propertyToRead  in propertiesToRead)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Property {0} = {1}", propertyToRead, existingAlias.GetPropertyValue(propertyToRead));
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

When I last looked into this, the client aliases were just persisted in the registry (HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSSQLServer\Client\ConnectTo), so the simplest route would be writing to both the WoW (HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\MSSQLServer\Client\ConnectTo) and 'normal' locations when running on x64. Note that if you're running as a 32-bit process, you'll either need to p/invoke or (if on .net 4) specify the 64-bit view when writing the 64-bit version.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I guess I could indeed just hit the registry...I'll do that if I can't get it working with WMI, but I'm just curious still as to how to do with with WMI. –  Jeff Aug 16 '10 at 3:06
    
the only way i know of with WMI is to run the same code twice, once in a 32-bit process, once in a 64-bit process (when running on x64, of course). checking in powershell seems to confirm. –  James Manning Aug 16 '10 at 12:06
    
ah, looks like you can do it - you would need to run as a 64-bit process (so change your platform target to AnyCPU, I'd suggest, since the default is x86 and I'm assuming that's why you're running as 32-bit) but you can access the 32-bit WMI provider from 64-bit: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa393067(VS.85).aspx –  James Manning Aug 16 '10 at 12:10

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