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I have a script that fetches several web pages and parses the info.

(An example can be seen at http://bluedevilbooks.com/search/?DEPT=MATH&CLASS=103&SEC=01 )

I ran cProfile on it, and as I assumed, urlopen takes up a lot of time. Is there a way to fetch the pages faster? Or a way to fetch several pages at once? I'll do whatever is simplest, as I'm new to python and web developing.

Thanks in advance! :)

UPDATE: I have a function called fetchURLs(), which I use to make an array of the URLs I need so something like urls = fetchURLS().The URLS are all XML files from Amazon and eBay APIs (which confuses me as to why it takes so long to load, maybe my webhost is slow?)

What I need to do is load each URL, read each page, and send that data to another part of the script which will parse and display the data.

Note that I can't do the latter part until ALL of the pages have been fetched, that's what my issue is.

Also, my host limits me to 25 processes at a time, I believe, so whatever is easiest on the server would be nice :)


Here it is for time:

Sun Aug 15 20:51:22 2010    prof

         211352 function calls (209292 primitive calls) in 22.254 CPU seconds

   Ordered by: internal time
   List reduced from 404 to 10 due to restriction <10>

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
       10   18.056    1.806   18.056    1.806 {_socket.getaddrinfo}
     4991    2.730    0.001    2.730    0.001 {method 'recv' of '_socket.socket' objects}
       10    0.490    0.049    0.490    0.049 {method 'connect' of '_socket.socket' objects}
     2415    0.079    0.000    0.079    0.000 {method 'translate' of 'unicode' objects}
       12    0.061    0.005    0.745    0.062 /usr/local/lib/python2.6/HTMLParser.py:132(goahead)
     3428    0.060    0.000    0.202    0.000 /usr/local/lib/python2.6/site-packages/BeautifulSoup.py:1306(endData)
     1698    0.055    0.000    0.068    0.000 /usr/local/lib/python2.6/site-packages/BeautifulSoup.py:1351(_smartPop)
     4125    0.053    0.000    0.056    0.000 /usr/local/lib/python2.6/site-packages/BeautifulSoup.py:118(setup)
     1698    0.042    0.000    0.358    0.000 /usr/local/lib/python2.6/HTMLParser.py:224(parse_starttag)
     1698    0.042    0.000    0.275    0.000 /usr/local/lib/python2.6/site-packages/BeautifulSoup.py:1397(unknown_starttag)
share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 15 down vote accepted

EDIT: I'm expanding the answer to include a more polished example. I have found a lot hostility and misinformation in this post regarding threading v.s. async I/O. Therefore I also adding more argument to refute certain invalid claim. I hope this will help people to choose the right tool for the right job.

This is a dup to a question 3 days ago.

Python urllib2.open is slow, need a better way to read several urls - Stack Overflow http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3472515/python-urllib2-open-is-slow-need-a-better-way-to-read-several-urls/3472905#3472905

I'm polishing the code to show how to fetch multiple webpage in parallel using threads.

import time
import threading
import Queue

# utility - spawn a thread to execute target for each args
def run_parallel_in_threads(target, args_list):
    result = Queue.Queue()
    # wrapper to collect return value in a Queue
    def task_wrapper(*args):
        result.put(target(*args))
    threads = [threading.Thread(target=task_wrapper, args=args) for args in args_list]
    for t in threads:
        t.start()
    for t in threads:
        t.join()
    return result

def dummy_task(n):
    for i in xrange(n):
        time.sleep(0.1)
    return n

# below is the application code
urls = [
    ('http://www.google.com/',),
    ('http://www.lycos.com/',),
    ('http://www.bing.com/',),
    ('http://www.altavista.com/',),
    ('http://achewood.com/',),
]

def fetch(url):
    return urllib2.urlopen(url).read()

run_parallel_in_threads(fetch, urls)

As you can see, the application specific code has only 3 lines, which can be collapsed into 1 line if you are aggressive. I don't think anyone can justify their claim that this is complex and unmaintainable.

Unfortunately most other threading code posted here has some flaws. Many of them do active polling to wait for the code to finish. join() is a better way to synchronize the code. I think this code has improved upon all the threading examples so far.

keep-alive connection

WoLpH's suggestion about using keep-alive connection could be very useful if all you URLs are pointing to the same server.

twisted

Aaron Gallagher is a fans of twisted framework and he is hostile any people who suggest thread. Unfortunately a lot of his claims are misinformation. For example he said "-1 for suggesting threads. This is IO-bound; threads are useless here." This contrary to evidence as both Nick T and I have demonstrated speed gain from the using thread. In fact I/O bound application has the most to gain from using Python's thread (v.s. no gain in CPU bound application). Aaron's misguided criticism on thread shows he is rather confused about parallel programming in general.

Right tool for the right job

I'm well aware of the issues pertain to parallel programming using threads, python, async I/O and so on. Each tool has their pros and cons. For each situation there is an appropriate tool. I'm not against twisted (though I have not deployed one myself). But I don't believe we can flat out say that thread is BAD and twisted is GOOD in all situations.

For example, if the OP's requirement is to fetch 10,000 website in parallel, async I/O will be prefereable. Threading won't be appropriable (unless maybe with stackless Python).

Aaron's opposition to threads are mostly generalizations. He fail to recognize that this is a trivial parallelization task. Each task is independent and do not share resources. So most of his attack do not apply.

Given my code has no external dependency, I'll call it right tool for the right job.

Performance

I think most people would agree that performance of this task is largely depend on the networking code and the external server, where the performance of platform code should have negligible effect. However Aaron's benchmark show an 50% speed gain over the threaded code. I think it is necessary to response to this apparent speed gain.

In Nick's code, there is an obvious flaw that caused the inefficiency. But how do you explain the 233ms speed gain over my code? I think even twisted fans will refrain from jumping into conclusion to attribute this to the efficiency of twisted. There are, after all, a huge amount of variable outside of the system code, like the remote server's performance, network, caching, and difference implementation between urllib2 and twisted web client and so on.

Just to make sure Python's threading will not incur a huge amount of inefficiency, I do a quick benchmark to spawn 5 threads and then 500 threads. I am quite comfortable to say the overhead of spawning 5 thread is negligible and cannot explain the 233ms speed difference.

In [274]: %time run_parallel_in_threads(dummy_task, [(0,)]*5)
CPU times: user 0.00 s, sys: 0.00 s, total: 0.00 s
Wall time: 0.00 s
Out[275]: <Queue.Queue instance at 0x038B2878>

In [276]: %time run_parallel_in_threads(dummy_task, [(0,)]*500)
CPU times: user 0.16 s, sys: 0.00 s, total: 0.16 s
Wall time: 0.16 s

In [278]: %time run_parallel_in_threads(dummy_task, [(10,)]*500)
CPU times: user 1.13 s, sys: 0.00 s, total: 1.13 s
Wall time: 1.13 s       <<<<<<<< This means 0.13s of overhead

Further testing on my parallel fetching shows a huge variability in the response time in 17 runs. (Unfortunately I don't have twisted to verify Aaron's code).

0.75 s
0.38 s
0.59 s
0.38 s
0.62 s
1.50 s
0.49 s
0.36 s
0.95 s
0.43 s
0.61 s
0.81 s
0.46 s
1.21 s
2.87 s
1.04 s
1.72 s

My testing does not support Aaron's conclusion that threading is consistently slower than async I/O by a measurable margin. Given the number of variables involved, I have to say this is not a valid test to measure the systematic performance difference between async I/O and threading.

share|improve this answer
1  
See the other comment I just left: I never said that threads can't be effective in this situation. It's just not worth the problems with threads that everyone seems to forget or ignore in their answers. Here is an enlightening graphic: erights.org/elib/concurrency/images/badtradeoff.gif –  habnabit Aug 16 '10 at 7:08
1  
This isn't an answer, it's three comments. Please don't abuse the Q/A system, comment as necessary. –  Devin Jeanpierre Aug 16 '10 at 7:44
2  
I don't need to test async I/O. The reason I say that is the range of my own testing is differ by as much as 2.51s, it will not be valid for someone to claim an alternative solution is consistently faster by a much smaller margin. Unless the alternative code is slower than this code by a margin a lot greater than 2.51, then we can claim it is consistently slower than this code. –  Wai Yip Tung Aug 17 '10 at 3:55
2  
@Aaron, you have not found any problem. You just making FUD claims. If you found anything in urllib2, or any other part of Python that's not thread safe, please file a bug. There are tons of production software using threads. If Python is not designed to be thread safe they will all be idiot to use it in production. –  Wai Yip Tung Aug 17 '10 at 4:02
5  
Off-topic; how does this answer have 5 downvotes? Twisted fans are quite vindictive. :P –  Nick T Aug 17 '10 at 6:47

Use twisted! It makes this kind of thing absurdly easy compared to, say, using threads.

from twisted.internet import defer, reactor
from twisted.web.client import getPage
import time

def processPage(page, url):
    # do somewthing here.
    return url, len(page)

def printResults(result):
    for success, value in result:
        if success:
            print 'Success:', value
        else:
            print 'Failure:', value.getErrorMessage()

def printDelta(_, start):
    delta = time.time() - start
    print 'ran in %0.3fs' % (delta,)
    return delta

urls = [
    'http://www.google.com/',
    'http://www.lycos.com/',
    'http://www.bing.com/',
    'http://www.altavista.com/',
    'http://achewood.com/',
]

def fetchURLs():
    callbacks = []
    for url in urls:
        d = getPage(url)
        d.addCallback(processPage, url)
        callbacks.append(d)

    callbacks = defer.DeferredList(callbacks)
    callbacks.addCallback(printResults)
    return callbacks

@defer.inlineCallbacks
def main():
    times = []
    for x in xrange(5):
        d = fetchURLs()
        d.addCallback(printDelta, time.time())
        times.append((yield d))
    print 'avg time: %0.3fs' % (sum(times) / len(times),)

reactor.callWhenRunning(main)
reactor.run()

This code also performs better than any of the other solutions posted (edited after I closed some things that were using a lot of bandwidth):

Success: ('http://www.google.com/', 8135)
Success: ('http://www.lycos.com/', 29996)
Success: ('http://www.bing.com/', 28611)
Success: ('http://www.altavista.com/', 8378)
Success: ('http://achewood.com/', 15043)
ran in 0.518s
Success: ('http://www.google.com/', 8135)
Success: ('http://www.lycos.com/', 30349)
Success: ('http://www.bing.com/', 28611)
Success: ('http://www.altavista.com/', 8378)
Success: ('http://achewood.com/', 15043)
ran in 0.461s
Success: ('http://www.google.com/', 8135)
Success: ('http://www.lycos.com/', 30033)
Success: ('http://www.bing.com/', 28611)
Success: ('http://www.altavista.com/', 8378)
Success: ('http://achewood.com/', 15043)
ran in 0.435s
Success: ('http://www.google.com/', 8117)
Success: ('http://www.lycos.com/', 30349)
Success: ('http://www.bing.com/', 28611)
Success: ('http://www.altavista.com/', 8378)
Success: ('http://achewood.com/', 15043)
ran in 0.449s
Success: ('http://www.google.com/', 8135)
Success: ('http://www.lycos.com/', 30349)
Success: ('http://www.bing.com/', 28611)
Success: ('http://www.altavista.com/', 8378)
Success: ('http://achewood.com/', 15043)
ran in 0.547s
avg time: 0.482s

And using Nick T's code, rigged up to also give the average of five and show the output better:

Starting threaded reads:
...took 1.921520 seconds ([8117, 30070, 15043, 8386, 28611])
Starting threaded reads:
...took 1.779461 seconds ([8135, 15043, 8386, 30349, 28611])
Starting threaded reads:
...took 1.756968 seconds ([8135, 8386, 15043, 30349, 28611])
Starting threaded reads:
...took 1.762956 seconds ([8386, 8135, 15043, 29996, 28611])
Starting threaded reads:
...took 1.654377 seconds ([8117, 30349, 15043, 8386, 28611])
avg time: 1.775s

Starting sequential reads:
...took 1.389803 seconds ([8135, 30147, 28611, 8386, 15043])
Starting sequential reads:
...took 1.457451 seconds ([8135, 30051, 28611, 8386, 15043])
Starting sequential reads:
...took 1.432214 seconds ([8135, 29996, 28611, 8386, 15043])
Starting sequential reads:
...took 1.447866 seconds ([8117, 30028, 28611, 8386, 15043])
Starting sequential reads:
...took 1.468946 seconds ([8153, 30051, 28611, 8386, 15043])
avg time: 1.439s

And using Wai Yip Tung's code:

Fetched 8117 from http://www.google.com/
Fetched 28611 from http://www.bing.com/
Fetched 8386 from http://www.altavista.com/
Fetched 30051 from http://www.lycos.com/
Fetched 15043 from http://achewood.com/
done in 0.704s
Fetched 8117 from http://www.google.com/
Fetched 28611 from http://www.bing.com/
Fetched 8386 from http://www.altavista.com/
Fetched 30114 from http://www.lycos.com/
Fetched 15043 from http://achewood.com/
done in 0.845s
Fetched 8153 from http://www.google.com/
Fetched 28611 from http://www.bing.com/
Fetched 8386 from http://www.altavista.com/
Fetched 30070 from http://www.lycos.com/
Fetched 15043 from http://achewood.com/
done in 0.689s
Fetched 8117 from http://www.google.com/
Fetched 28611 from http://www.bing.com/
Fetched 8386 from http://www.altavista.com/
Fetched 30114 from http://www.lycos.com/
Fetched 15043 from http://achewood.com/
done in 0.647s
Fetched 8135 from http://www.google.com/
Fetched 28611 from http://www.bing.com/
Fetched 8386 from http://www.altavista.com/
Fetched 30349 from http://www.lycos.com/
Fetched 15043 from http://achewood.com/
done in 0.693s
avg time: 0.715s

I've gotta say, I do like that the sequential fetches performed better for me.

share|improve this answer
1  
I do like that I've gotten -2 with no comments! Come on, downvoters, try to show that my code is bad~ –  habnabit Aug 16 '10 at 14:13
4  
Your benchmarks a mildly flawed imho. You are benchmarking the great search engines which will always respond nearly instant. When using your solution with normal websites the sequential fetches will perform worse because than the bottleneck will be on the server side/internet instead of your Python code. –  Wolph Aug 16 '10 at 14:57
1  
@WoLpH, I modified the other code I tested to request the same sites. See how the lengths are all basically the same? –  habnabit Aug 16 '10 at 15:11
2  
@WoLpH, also, "huge"? Twisted is quite a bit smaller than python. –  habnabit Aug 16 '10 at 15:15
2  
@Parker, If you have a large list of urls this approach may not work well for you as it opens one connection per url more or less simultaneously. This may be causing your internet connection to choke up. Try running a smaller number of urls at a time to see if that helps –  John La Rooy Aug 17 '10 at 3:41

Here is an example using python Threads. The other threaded examples here launch a thread per url, which is not very friendly behaviour if it causes too many hits for the server to handle (for example it is common for spiders to have many urls on the same host)

from threading import Thread
from urllib2 import urlopen
from time import time, sleep

WORKERS=1
urls = ['http://docs.python.org/library/threading.html',
        'http://docs.python.org/library/thread.html',
        'http://docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html',
        'http://docs.python.org/howto/urllib2.html']*10
results = []

class Worker(Thread):
    def run(self):
        while urls:
            url = urls.pop()
            results.append((url, urlopen(url).read()))

start = time()
threads = [Worker() for i in range(WORKERS)]
any(t.start() for t in threads)

while len(results)<40:
    sleep(0.1)
print time()-start

Note: The times given here are for 40 urls and will depend a lot on the speed of your internet connection and the latency to the server. Being in Australia, my ping is > 300ms

With WORKERS=1 it took 86 seconds to run
With WORKERS=4 it took 23 seconds to run
with WORKERS=10 it took 10 seconds to run

so having 10 threads downloading is 8.6 times as fast as a single thread.

Here is an upgraded version that uses a Queue. There are at least a couple of advantages.
1. The urls are requested in the order that they appear in the list
2. Can use q.join() to detect when the requests have all completed
3. The results are kept in the same order as the url list

from threading import Thread
from urllib2 import urlopen
from time import time, sleep
from Queue import Queue

WORKERS=10
urls = ['http://docs.python.org/library/threading.html',
        'http://docs.python.org/library/thread.html',
        'http://docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html',
        'http://docs.python.org/howto/urllib2.html']*10
results = [None]*len(urls)

def worker():
    while True:
        i, url = q.get()
        # print "requesting ", i, url       # if you want to see what's going on
        results[i]=urlopen(url).read()
        q.task_done()

start = time()
q = Queue()
for i in range(WORKERS):
    t=Thread(target=worker)
    t.daemon = True
    t.start()

for i,url in enumerate(urls):
    q.put((i,url))
q.join()
print time()-start
share|improve this answer
1  
Not according to my benchmarks. I think you're doing something wrong. –  habnabit Aug 16 '10 at 13:21
3  
I would like to listen to you to show how list.append is not atomic. I've looked at the byte code - dis.dis(compile("[].append(1)","","exec")). The append happens in instruction #9. It looks atomic to me. –  Wai Yip Tung Aug 16 '10 at 19:50
2  
@Aaron, Queue does more than transferring data atomically. It is a bounded buffer, meaning it can block producer or consumer until data or space is available for synchronization purpose. –  Wai Yip Tung Aug 16 '10 at 20:56
2  
@Aaron, about Queue, let me remind you of the context. You was challenging gnibbler's claim that list.append is atomic. And you say Queue would not exist if list.append is atomic. I was reminding you that Queue's primary purpose is to implement bounded buffer. –  Wai Yip Tung Aug 17 '10 at 3:40
2  
@Aaron, about if the append function call is atomic. I think anyone with good sense will design a fundamental operation like append as single step, not compose of other python steps. But if you don't believe it, fair enough, let's look at the Python source code. (svn.python.org/view/python/tags/r27rc2/Objects/…) Append is implemented by PyList_Append(). It looks pretty sane for me. No release of GIL. No calling of other Python function. I stopped tracing when it gets to PyMem_RESIZE. But I think they will be insane to release the GIL there. –  Wai Yip Tung Aug 17 '10 at 3:48

Nowadays there is excellent Python lib that do this for you called requests.

Use standard api of requests if you want solution based on threads or async api (using gevent under the hood) if you want solution based on non-blocking IO.

share|improve this answer

Most of the answers focused on fetching multiple pages from different servers at the same time (threading) but not on reusing already open HTTP connection. If OP is making multiple request to the same server/site.

In urlib2 a separate connection is created with each request which impacts performance and and as a result slower rate of fetching pages. urllib3 solves this problem by using a connection pool. Can read more here urllib3 [Also thread-safe]

There is also Requests an HTTP library that uses urllib3

This combined with threading should increase the speed of fetching pages

share|improve this answer

Fetching webpages obviously will take a while as you're not accessing anything local. If you have several to access, you could use the threading module to run a couple at once.

Here's a very crude example

import threading
import urllib2
import time

urls = ['http://docs.python.org/library/threading.html',
        'http://docs.python.org/library/thread.html',
        'http://docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html',
        'http://docs.python.org/howto/urllib2.html']
data1 = []
data2 = []

class PageFetch(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, url, datadump):
        self.url = url
        self.datadump = datadump
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
    def run(self):
        page = urllib2.urlopen(self.url)
        self.datadump.append(page.read()) # don't do it like this.

print "Starting threaded reads:"
start = time.clock()
for url in urls:
    PageFetch(url, data2).start()
while len(data2) < len(urls): pass # don't do this either.
print "...took %f seconds" % (time.clock() - start)

print "Starting sequential reads:"
start = time.clock()
for url in urls:
    page = urllib2.urlopen(url)
    data1.append(page.read())
print "...took %f seconds" % (time.clock() - start)

for i,x in enumerate(data1):
    print len(data1[i]), len(data2[i])

This was the output when I ran it:

Starting threaded reads:
...took 2.035579 seconds
Starting sequential reads:
...took 4.307102 seconds
73127 19923
19923 59366
361483 73127
59366 361483

Grabbing the data from the thread by appending to a list is probably ill-advised (Queue would be better) but it illustrates that there is a difference.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Nick! Much appreciated :) –  Parker Aug 16 '10 at 2:43
    
And may I ask why self.datadump.append(page.read()) # don't do it like this. is ill advised? –  Parker Aug 16 '10 at 3:09
1  
-1 for suggesting threads. This is IO-bound; threads are useless here. –  habnabit Aug 16 '10 at 3:19
2  
@Aaron Gallagher Why did it run over twice as fast using threads? –  Nick T Aug 16 '10 at 3:53
1  
I never denied that your code can execute in less time. The problem is that the means by which you achieve that produce unsustainable, overcomplicated code compared to using async IO. –  habnabit Aug 16 '10 at 4:27

The actual wait is probably not in urllib2 but in the server and/or your network connection to the server.

There are 2 ways of speeding this up.

  1. Keep the connection alive (see this question on how to do that: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1037406/python-urllib2-with-keep-alive)
  2. Use multiplle connections, you can use threads or an async approach as Aaron Gallagher suggested. For that, simply use any threading example and you should do fine :) You can also use the multiprocessing lib to make things pretty easy.
share|improve this answer
1  
-1 for suggesting threads. This is IO-bound; threads are useless here. –  habnabit Aug 16 '10 at 3:14
2  
@Aaron, usually threads work brilliantly for downloading webpages. The process won't be I/O bound unless it's downloading really large files or the latency is very low. urllib2 will typically spend most of it's time blocked, waiting for a response which is perfect conditions for Pythons GIL/threading –  John La Rooy Aug 16 '10 at 3:21
1  
@gnibbler, no, that's what IO bound means: the process spends most of its time waiting on IO. Multiple threads don't make you wait for data any faster. Just use nonblocking IO; there's no extra code complexity or locking overhead. –  habnabit Aug 16 '10 at 3:28
1  
@Aaron, sure you are correct about the definition of IO Bound, but wrong about the effectiveness of threading to download a bunch of urls. –  John La Rooy Aug 16 '10 at 6:51
1  
@gnibbler, I never once said it wasn't effective. I've only been claiming that it's not worth the numerous pitfalls and caveats associated with it, which most of the answers conveniently gloss over or ignore. –  habnabit Aug 16 '10 at 7:05

Here's a standard library solution. It's not quite as fast, but it uses less memory than the threaded solutions.

try:
    from http.client import HTTPConnection, HTTPSConnection
except ImportError:
    from httplib import HTTPConnection, HTTPSConnection
connections = []
results = []

for url in urls:
    scheme, _, host, path = url.split('/', 3)
    h = (HTTPConnection if scheme == 'http:' else HTTPSConnection)(host)
    h.request('GET', '/' + path)
    connections.append(h)
for h in connections:
    results.append(h.getresponse().read())

Also, if most of your requests are to the same host, then reusing the same http connection would probably help more than doing things in parallel.

share|improve this answer

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