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I need to compare few function calls and signature between my application and an working application. Here I don't mean any way to reverse engineer or access the source code of the other application , but truly need to know what are the methods , Interfaces used by the working application.

I tried attaching my application to Visual Studio and then , Start>Debug , but this doesn't provide any useful information. Any help.

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4 Answers 4

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Reflector Pro Visual Studio plug in can debug not only exe you write, but any other assembly ;)

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you can debug code, but once its compiled, its machine language and a debugger in Visual Studio is not going to do anything at all.

In order to get an idea of what a compiled executable is doing, you can use a program like this: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896645.aspx

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Couple of solutions that I can think of:

  1. Attach the exe with VS IDE Debugger, and use PDB files to debug the exe
  2. Use Reflector to point towards your exe, and check the source. See example.
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Where is the Debug Store Located –  Simsons Aug 16 '10 at 5:57
    
@Subhen: What do you mean by Debug Store? PDB files gets generated when you build a project, usually in debug folder, depending upon the settings you have. –  KMån Aug 16 '10 at 6:52
    
After Compiling the Code it ,I is not displaying the code in Visual Studio. I am using VS Plugin. After Compiling the code it says "Saving Decompiled assembly to Debug Store". –  Simsons Aug 16 '10 at 8:59
    
@Subhen: Checkout C:\Users\<Username>\AppData\Local\Red Gate\.NET Reflector 6\Cache? –  KMån Aug 17 '10 at 4:46
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Runtime Flow (developed by me) can show all method calls in the working .NET application without need for source code.

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