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I'd like some advice on performing a simple image analysis in python. I need to calculate a value for the "brightness" of an image. I know PIL is the goto library for doing something like this. There is a built-in histogram function.

What I need is a "perceived brightness" values I can decide if further adjustments to the image are necessary. So what are something of the basic techniques that will work in this situation? Should I just work with the RGB values, or will histogram give me something close enough?

One possible solution might be to combine the two, and generate average R,G,and B values using the histogram, then apply the "perceived brightness" formula.

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What prevents you from implementing the algorithm you linked to in Python with PIL? Are you asking about an alternative algorithm, about how to use PIL or what? –  Eli Bendersky Aug 16 '10 at 5:40
    
Just want to make sure I'm not missing some obvious feature/module that already does this. It seems like this type of thing should already exist. –  Casey Aug 16 '10 at 9:24
    
Figuring out the perceived brightness on an image is radically different than finding that of a simple color. The viewer may care more about the subject's brightness, but there are typically more background pixels than subject pixels. –  Nick T Aug 16 '10 at 16:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Using the techniques mentioned in question, I came up with a few different versions.

Each method returns a value close, but not exactly the same as the others. Also, all methods run about the same speed except for the last one, which is much slower depending on the image size.

  1. Covert image to greyscale, return average pixel brightness.

    def brightness( im_file ):
       im = Image.open(im_file).convert('L')
       stat = ImageStat.Stat(im)
       return stat.mean[0]
    
  2. Covert image to greyscale, return RMS pixel brightness.

    def brightness( im_file ):
       im = Image.open(im_file).convert('L')
       stat = ImageStat.Stat(im)
       return stat.rms[0]
    
  3. Average pixels, then transform to "perceived brightness".

    def brightness( im_file ):
       im = Image.open(im_file)
       stat = ImageStat.Stat(im)
       r,g,b = stat.mean
       return math.sqrt(0.241*(r**2) + 0.691*(g**2) + 0.068*(b**2))
    
  4. RMS of pixels, then transform to "perceived brightness".

    def brightness( im_file ):
       im = Image.open(im_file)
       stat = ImageStat.Stat(im)
       r,g,b = stat.rms
       return math.sqrt(0.241*(r**2) + 0.691(g**2) + 0.068*(b**2))
    
  5. Calculate "perceived brightness" of pixels, then return average.

    def brightness( im_file ):
       im = Image.open(im_file)
       stat = ImageStat.Stat(im)
       gs = (math.sqrt(0.241*(r**2) + 0.691*(g**2) + 0.068*(b**2)) 
             for r,g,b in im.getdata())
       return sum(gs)/stat.count[0]
    

Update Test Results I ran a simulation against 200 images. I found that methods #2,#4 gave almost identical results. Also methods #3,#5 were also nearly identical. Method #1 closely followed #3,#5 (with a few exceptions).

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Just to comment on speed: In my tests, taking them just as they are, Method #2, #3, and #4 were about evenly fast (taking ~140ms to process 20 images of varying sizes), Method #1 was only slightly slower (~180ms) and Method #5 is really slow (~3505ms). To be expected, but should probably rather stick with #3 if you're choosing between #1, #3 and #5. –  Herman Schaaf Feb 26 '13 at 8:17

Given that you're just looking for an average across the whole image, and not per-pixel brightness values, averaging PIL's histogram and applying the brightness function to the output seems like the best approach for that library.

If using ImageMagick (with the PythonMagick bindings), I would suggest using the identify command with the "verbose" option set. This will provide you with a mean value for each channel, saving you the need to sum and average a histogram — you can just multiply each channel directly.

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1  
As one who tried to maintain PythonMagick and provided 0.9.1 version, I would not recommend using it in its current state. Recent changes in ImageMagick broken a lot of PythonMagick code. Package's original author came up with another ImageMagick python bindings, public.procoders.net/PythonMagickWand/docs/html/index.html, it is preferrable over current PythonMagick –  Daniel Kluev Aug 16 '10 at 23:52

I think your best result would come from converting the RGB to grayscale using your favorite formula, then taking the histogram of that result. I'm not sure if the mean or the median of the histogram would be more appropriate, but on most images they are probably similar.

I'm not sure how to do the conversion to grayscale in PIL using an arbitrary formula, but I'm guessing it's possible.

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Sounds like a good idea. I'll try that as well. –  Casey Aug 17 '10 at 10:33

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