Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For my first question here I would like to ask you how you'd do the following in Ruby.

I have a hash with the following aspect

variables["foo"] = [1,2,3]
variables["bar"] = [4,5,6,7]
variables[...] = ...

Update: this hash will have an arbitrary number of key => values pairs.

So it represents parameters and their possible values. I would like to "generate" now an Array containing hashes whose key=>value pairs represent each possible combination of the variables. In the case of the example above, I would have an array of 12 (=3x4) hashes like that

[ hash1, hash2, ..., hash16]

where hash*i* would be

 hash1["foo"] = 1
 hash1["bar"] = 4
 hash2["foo"] = 1
 hash2["bar"] = 5
 hash3["foo"] = 1
 hash3["bar"] = 6
 hash4["foo"] = 1
 hash4["bar"] = 7
 hash5["foo"] = 2
 hash5["bar"] = 4
 hash6["foo"] = 3
 hash6["bar"] = 4
 ...
 hash16["foo"] = 3
 hash16["bar"] = 7

I have a few ideas but all of them are quite complicated nested loops ...

Thanks a lot !

share|improve this question
    
shouldn't hash2["foo"] = 2? –  corroded Aug 16 '10 at 10:39
    
I would like to first have the first value of the first variable and every values of the second one, then the second value of the first variable and every values of the second one, etc. –  Cedric H. Aug 16 '10 at 12:27
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
vars = {foo: [1, 2, 3], bar: [4, 5, 6, 7]}

(v = vars.map {|k, v| ([k] * v.length).zip(v) }).first.product(*v.drop(1)).
map {|args| args.reduce({}) {|h, (k, v)| h.tap {|h| h[k] = v }}}
# => [{:foo=>1, :bar=>4},
# =>  {:foo=>1, :bar=>5},
# =>  {:foo=>1, :bar=>6},
# =>  {:foo=>1, :bar=>7},
# =>  {:foo=>2, :bar=>4},
# =>  {:foo=>2, :bar=>5},
# =>  {:foo=>2, :bar=>6},
# =>  {:foo=>2, :bar=>7},
# =>  {:foo=>3, :bar=>4},
# =>  {:foo=>3, :bar=>5},
# =>  {:foo=>3, :bar=>6},
# =>  {:foo=>3, :bar=>7}]

This works with arbitrary many entries and arbitrary keys.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot ! I still have to understand it completely but it works as I wanted. –  Cedric H. Aug 16 '10 at 13:48
add comment
vars.values.inject(&:product).map{|values|
  Hash[vars.keys.zip(values.flatten)]
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is really nice. I was toying around with something similar, but then I couldn't find anything in the language specification that would guarantee that Hash#keys and Hash#values would return the items in the same order, so I backed away from it. But now I realize that I am using some 1.9 features anyway, and in 1.9, Hash es are of course guaranteed to be ordered anyhow, so your solution is much nicer, assuming that you run it on 1.9. –  Jörg W Mittag Aug 17 '10 at 0:39
add comment

Ruby syntax for an Array is brackets, and for a hash is curly braces with a key, hash rocket => value.

variables = { "foo" => [1,2,3] , "bar" => [4,5,6,7] }

results = Array.new

variables["foo"].each do |foo_variable|
  variables["bar"].each do |bar_variable|
    results << { "foo" => foo_variable , "bar" => bar_variable }
  end
end

require "pp"
pp results
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But I forgot to say that the "variables" hash has an arbitrary number of entries. –  Cedric H. Aug 16 '10 at 13:29
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.