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Suppose I have a sorted array of integers int[], and I want to search the closest smaller value to some input number.

for example if the array contains (1) , (23), (57) , (59), (120) and the input is 109, the output should be 59.

I am just trying to see suggestions and compare to the approaches I already have.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Use Array.BinarySearch. If the input is in the list, it will return the index, and if not then it will return the complement of the index of the first larger value. You just invert the result and subtract one to get the index of the closest smaller value.

int[] arr = { 1, 23, 57, 59, 120 };
int index = Array.BinarySearch(arr, 109);
if (index < 0)
{
    index = ~index - 1;
}
if (index >= 0)
{
    var result = arr[index];
}

Note that if you have an input smaller than the smallest element, you don't have a well-defined answer.

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when will (index >= 0) in the last if not be true? (and no I'm not looking for when index is less than zero :P) –  Rune FS Aug 16 '10 at 12:04
    
@Rune FS: Try searching for 0. ~index will be 0 since 1 is the next-highest number, so ~index - 1 will be -1. There is no element smaller than the input, so there is no valid answer. –  Quartermeister Aug 16 '10 at 12:10

using Linq:

int[] arr = new[] { 1, 23, 57, 59, 120 };
int target = 109;
int max = arr.Where(n => n < target).Max();

Maybe not the fastest but probably the easiest to implement. Also doesn't rely on the array being sorted, as binary search does.

Note that the call to Max will throw an exception if the Where filter results in no elements, so you might want to check that if it's a possibility.

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oh - snap. great minds :) –  jim tollan Aug 16 '10 at 12:16
    
possible duplicate :P stackoverflow.com/questions/3492840/… –  mustafabar Aug 16 '10 at 12:21
    
mustapha - cute :).. btw, as they were so similar, have updated mine to show fear's suggestion re checking fo exceptions –  jim tollan Aug 16 '10 at 12:28
    
Shouldn't it be n <= target? –  adam0101 Aug 16 '10 at 13:55

I'd go for a linq solution (updated: to add a little more code to stop from being similar to fear's similar solution):

int[] arr1 = { 1, 23, 57, 59, 120 };
int maxResult;
string errorMsg;
try
{
    maxResult = arr1.Where(x => x <= 109).Max();
}
catch(Exception e)
{
    errorMsg = e.Message;
    // do some error stuff here :)
    return null;
}
// party on your maxResult...
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just to extrapolate on the other LINQ solutions this extension method will return -1 if no objects fits the filter and expects that the list is all positive integers

public static int SearchForLimit(this IEnuemerable<int> sequence, Predicate<int> filter)
{
   return (from i in sequence
           let n = filter(i) ? i : -1
           select n).Max()
}

usage would look like this:

int[] arr1 = { 1, 23, 57, 59, 120 };
int limitedBy109 = arr1.SearchForLimit(i => i < 109);
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int getIndex( long[] list, long value )
{
    int top = 0;
    int bot = list.length-1;
    int mid=0;
    while ( top <= bot )
    {
        mid = (top+bot)/2; // NB integer arithmetic
        if ( value < list[mid] )
        {
            if ( mid == 0 )
                // value < than first item
                return -1;  
            else
                bot = mid-1;
        }
        else    // value >= list[mid]
        {
            if ( mid == list.length-1 )
                // value is >= last item
                break;
            else if ( value >= list[mid+1] )
                top = mid+1;
            else // list[mid] must be biggest <= value
                break;
        }
    }
    return mid;
}
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