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I have tried:

ALTER TABLE MY_TABLE 
ADD STAGE INT NOT NULL;

But it gives this error message:

ALTER TABLE only allows columns to be added that can contain nulls or have a DEFAULT definition specified

share|improve this question
up vote 85 down vote accepted

As an option you can initially create Null-able column, then update your table column with valid not null values and finally ALTER column to set NOT NULL constraint:

ALTER TABLE MY_TABLE ADD STAGE INT NULL
GO
UPDATE MY_TABLE <set valid not null values for your column>
GO
ALTER TABLE MY_TABLE ALTER COLUMN STAGE INT NOT NULL
GO

Another option is to specify correct default value for your column:

ALTER TABLE MY_TABLE ADD STAGE INT NOT NULL DEFAULT '0'
share|improve this answer
    
I personally prefer the first way here if you have values you can put in the field manually. That way you don't have to worry about creating and deleting a default constraint where you don't need one. – Mark W Dickson Oct 23 '13 at 22:08
    
@MarkWDickson - The first one seems more dangerous to me. What happens if the wrong column slipped into the set statement: UPDATE MY_TABLE SET Employee_Salary = 0 – acarlon Jan 16 '14 at 4:44
1  
@acarlon - I think that's reaching. The dangerous update statement you mention would be detrimental in any query. It should be simple enough to see if you have an extra column in the update statement here. You would generally be adding only a column or two at a time. If you happen to add an extra column into your update statement that doesn't belong there, in this example, then maybe you shouldn't be in charge of data in the first place. – Mark W Dickson Jan 16 '14 at 20:01
    
@MarkWDickson - I would think that one of the duties of being in charge of data is to minimize change. It is not another update statement or column, it is the column name being incorrect. For example a database where there are two columns with similar names and the incorrect name is chosen. This is a statement that sets every row to some value (e.g. 0) for a particular column. Sometimes sweeping modifications need to be made and due care should be taken, but in this case there is an alternative, so why introduce the risk? – acarlon Jan 16 '14 at 20:58
1  
ANDROID Developers using SQLite be aware that ALTER COLUMN is NOT supported in SQLite. – Sdghasemi Aug 3 '15 at 8:10

If you aren't allowing the column to be Null you need to provide a default to populate existing rows. e.g.

ALTER TABLE dbo.YourTbl ADD
    newcol int NOT NULL CONSTRAINT DF_YourTbl_newcol DEFAULT 0
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The error message is quite descriptive, try:

ALTER TABLE MyTable ADD Stage INT NOT NULL DEFAULT '-';
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Other SQL implementations have similar restrictions. The reason is that adding a column requires adding values for that column (logically, even if not physically), which default to NULL. If you don't allow NULL, and don't have a default, what is the value going to be?

Since SQL Server supports ADD CONSTRAINT, I'd recommend Pavel's approach of creating a nullable column, and then adding a NOT NULL constraint after you've filled it with non-NULL values.

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This worked for me, can also be "borrowed" from the design view, make changes -> right click -> generate change script.

BEGIN TRANSACTION
GO
ALTER TABLE dbo.YOURTABLE ADD
    YOURCOLUMN bit NOT NULL CONSTRAINT DF_YOURTABLE_YOURCOLUMN DEFAULT 0
GO
COMMIT
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ALTER TABLE `MY_TABLE` ADD COLUMN `STAGE` INTEGER UNSIGNED NOT NULL AFTER `PREV_COLUMN`;
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