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We are working on improving our DAL which is written in LINQ that talks to the MS SQL database. Our goal is to achieve good re-usability with as little code as possible.

LINQ generated files are making a use of generics and reflection to map LINQ generated classes to the SQL objects (tables and views in our case).

Please see the example of the existing accessor. This method resides in the partial class that contains custom constructors, accessors and mutators:

public clsDVD getDVD(int dvdId)
{
   try
   {
      using (DataContext dvdDC = new DataContext(ConnectionStringManager.getLiveConnStr()))
      {
                    // Deferred loading
                    dvdDC.DeferredLoadingEnabled = false;

                    var tDVD = dvdDC.GetTable<DVD>();

                    return (from t in tDVD 
                            // Filter on DVD Id
                            where t.DVDId == (dvdId)
                            select t).Single();                   
      }
   catch (Exception e)
   {
       Logger.Log("Can't get requested DVD.", e);
       throw;
   }
 }

I believe that this is very easy to maintain, since the most of the work is done after var tDVD

It has been suggested not to declare tDVD at all and use dataContext.TableName, but behind the scenes it still calls GetTable<>.

The only way I can see of improving this is breaking this one partial class into 4 (CRUD) partial classes. E.g.

clsDVD_Select, clsDVD_Update, clsDVD_Insert, clsDVD_Delete

In this case each class will represent a set of behaviours.

The idea that we are discussing is to see whether it's possible to use generics on top of LINQ generics.

For example, instead of having the partial classes, we would figure out the properties of the class on the go by using reflection against the SQL database. My first concern here is performance impact. How significant will it be.

Instead of ClsDVD.getDVD(1231) we'd have something on the lines of: GenericDC.Select<DVD>(1231)

.Select method would figure out the primary key and run a select query on that table. I'm struggling to understand how can this work. Lets say we can get this to work for the simple select, i.e. select with a filter on primary key, but what is going to happen when we start doing complex joins and group by selects. What happens when we want to have multiple selects per DVD class?

My final concern is to do with good practices. I have been told before that it's good to have consistant code. For example, If I decide to use datatables , than I should stick to datatables throughout the project. It's a bad idea to have half of the project with datatables and another half with user defined classes. Do you agree on this?

I'm in a position where I think that existing implementation is quite good but maybe I'm missing out something very obvious and there is a much easier, more OO way of achieving the same results?

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
You say, "LINQ generated files are making a use of generics and reflection to map LINQ generated classes to the SQL objects (tables and views in our case)." Why are your LINQ generated classes not already representing your SQL objects (tables/views)? Why do you have two separate classes for that? – Kirk Woll Aug 16 '10 at 13:58
    
Hi, The LINQ generated classes sit inside the .dbml file They map directly to the SQL objects and I do make a use of them. For example LINQ generates a class for DVD. I add a partial class also called DVD which has my accessor method - getDVD. – user338195 Aug 16 '10 at 14:01
    
I do need to store the CRUD methods somewhere and I can'st store them along with LINQ generated code because it get modified heavily when I add/remove/modify SQL objects. Partial classes just make it tidier – user338195 Aug 16 '10 at 14:03
1  
Do you mean Linq2SQL instead of just "LINQ"? – quentin-starin Aug 16 '10 at 14:31
    
Yes, I'll update the title. Thx – user338195 Aug 16 '10 at 14:47
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is one way to make this situation a little more generic. Rince and repeat for the other CRUD opperations. For some sitiations the performance may be unacceptable. In those cases I would restructure that part of the program to call a non generic version.

public T GetSingleItem(Func<T,bool> idSelector ) where T : ??? // forgot what type it needs to be off the top of my head
{ 
    try 
    { 
        using (DataContext context = new DataContext(ConnectionStringManager.getLiveConnStr())) 
        { 
            context.DeferredLoadingEnabled = false; 
            return context.GetTable<T>().Single( item => idSelector( item );
        } 
    }
    catch (Exception e) 
    { 
        Logger.Log("Can't get requested item.", e); 
        throw; 
    } 
} 

This would be how you woudl have to get the item. Not quite as elegant becase you have to tell the generic function which column you are going to be using.

GenericDC.GetSingleItem<DVD>( dvd => dvd.ID == 1231 )

To make this even more generic that limiting it to a single item with an ID...

public IEnumerable<T> GetItems(Func<T,bool> selectFunction ) where T : ??? // forgot what type it needs to be off the top of my head
{ 
    try 
    { 
        using (DataContext context = new DataContext(ConnectionStringManager.getLiveConnStr())) 
        { 
            context.DeferredLoadingEnabled = false; 
            return context.GetTable<T>().Select( item => selectFunction( item );
        } 
    }
    catch (Exception e) 
    { 
        Logger.Log("Can't get requested item.", e); 
        throw; 
    } 
} 

Then you can call it like:

GenericDC.GetItems<DVD>( dvd => dvd.Title == "Title" && dvd.Cast.Contains( "Actor" ) );

Another possible solution would be to create a custom code generator that could you could modify in one place and create the similar routines for all other types. This would probably be a good solution if you are running into performace problems. You would want to limit the changes to the template piece of code that you use.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, the code in your example makes perfect sense. My concerns is that I won't always need idSelector, I'm likely to have selectors that will have few joins and a group by clause. Referring to what you said about custom code generator. Would this really improve maintenance and re-usability of the code? – user338195 Aug 16 '10 at 14:14
    
getDVD or getSingleItem work fine. Going back to the DVD example, I may want to select a DVD by any of the following criteria: Actors, Genre, Rating etc. At the moment the only way to achieve this (what I can see) is to add additional methods or to create a DVDSelect class and then inherit down to DVDSelect_Rating, DVDSelect_Title etc. – user338195 Aug 16 '10 at 14:16
1  
If you want to select by any column then you can tweak the code to just be a 'selector' that way you can look at whatever and howmany ever columns you need. In that case it probably wouldn't be a 'Single' operation. As far as joining, that makes things more complicated. I haven't found a good generic way to do that. – Jerod Houghtelling Aug 16 '10 at 14:19
    
I have found that code generators can go both ways good or bad. They go bad when they aren't kept up and if someone modifies the source that the output. – Jerod Houghtelling Aug 16 '10 at 14:25
1  
If the selector is going to be used in multiple places I would definitely extract that logic. IMO, duplicate code is the number one thing to eliminate. In this example you might have a 'DvdFinder' class which would have methods like 'ById', 'ByTitle', 'ByActor', etc. The VISITOR pattern might help you out in the cases were you need multiple criterion. Again, the join and group by's are going to be the hardest part of your implementation. The simpilest approach to that might be to create the functions one-by-one without generics to start. Then look for commonalities. – Jerod Houghtelling Aug 16 '10 at 14:49

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