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I have the following List :

List<Dictionary<int, Dictionary<string, string>>> lngList
lngList.Add(new Dictionary<int,Dictionary<string,string>>().Add(1,new Dictionary<string,string>().Add("Item1Key","Item1Value")));
lngList.Add(new Dictionary<int,Dictionary<string,string>>().Add(3,new Dictionary<string,string>().Add("Item1Key","Item1Value")));
lngList.Add(new Dictionary<int,Dictionary<string,string>>().Add(2,new Dictionary<string,string>().Add("Item1Key","Item1Value")));
lngList.Add(new Dictionary<int,Dictionary<string,string>>().Add(4,new Dictionary<string,string>().Add("Item1Key","Item1Value")));

I need to sort (ascending) this list on the basis of the integer value present inside the Dictionary.

This has to be achieved without using LINQ.

P.S. This is assuming all the the integer values added are unique.

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1  
Your sorting specification is incomplete. If a dictionary contains multiple values, which int should be used, lowest? highest? Lowest and then use next-lowest for ties when two dictionaries have the same lowest? –  Jon Hanna Aug 16 '10 at 14:35
    
The problem with sorting by the dictionary key is that each entry in the list is going to have multiple keys associated with it. Are you sure you have the right data structures for this problem? –  Ryan Brunner Aug 16 '10 at 14:35
1  
On the basis of which integer value present inside the dictionary? –  tzaman Aug 16 '10 at 14:36
2  
Have you considered using SortedDictionary<int, Dictionary<string, string>> instead of your list? –  Grzenio Aug 16 '10 at 14:46
1  
@Chad: Lots of houses sit behind the curve, for various reasons (some of them are even good reasons, one of our products is deployed on 1000s of desktops per client organisation). Upgrading those apps to .net 3.5 is a huge undertaking for the in-house IT folks, legal requirements state full regression tests must be performed to ensure .net 3.5 doesn't interfere with existing apps. We both know the odds of something going wrong are infintesimal, but a bean counter somewhere has a box to tick. We released our first .net 3.5 release of a desktop app in summer 2010 AFTER .net 4.0 was released. –  Binary Worrier Aug 16 '10 at 14:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest way to solve your solution is to use a SortedList instead of a List:

example:

SortedList<int, Dictionary<string, string>> lngList;

this will be sorted by default on the integer value

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I don’t understand how this answers the question. The question asks about how to sort a list of dictionaries, not a list of integer keys. Presumably the asker asked the wrong question? –  Timwi Aug 16 '10 at 15:09
1  
If you look at the code example you will see that he uses a dictionary where it actually is unneeded and I taught he would be better of with a sorted list and I assume it was a good taught because he accepted my answer –  Wouter Janssens - Xelos bvba Aug 16 '10 at 15:15
    
Right, so the asker asked the wrong question, which is what I thought. –  Timwi Aug 17 '10 at 19:24
    
maybe it is not a question of the wrong question. If you don't know the Sorted list you start with something else and get stuck an than ask how to get out of it but in many ways it is by starting different :-) –  Wouter Janssens - Xelos bvba Aug 17 '10 at 19:27

If each dictionary has only one key, and you don’t care what happens if it has multiple, you can do this:

lngList.Sort((a, b) => a.Keys.First().CompareTo(b.Keys.First()));

Since you stated that “This has to be achieved without using LINQ”, I assume you mean that the System.Linq namespace is not available to you. But that’s not a problem: you only need .First(), which you can easily define yourself:

public static class EnumerableExtensions {
    public static T First<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source) {
        using (var e = source.GetEnumerator()) {
            if (!e.MoveNext())
                throw new InvalidOperationException("The collection is empty.");
            return e.Current;
        }
    }
}

If you have to use .NET 2.0, which doesn’t have lambda expressions or extension methods, use this instead:

lngList.Sort(new Comparison<Dictionary<int, Dictionary<string, string>>>(sortFunc));

public int sortFunc(Dictionary<int, Dictionary<string, string>> a,
                    Dictionary<int, Dictionary<string, string>> b)
{
    return First(a.Keys).CompareTo(First(b.Keys));
}

public static T First<T>(IEnumerable<T> source) {
    using (var e = source.GetEnumerator()) {
        if (!e.MoveNext())
            throw new InvalidOperationException("The collection is empty.");
        return e.Current;
    }
}
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Btw, both lambda expressions and extension methods can be used in .NET 2.0. You need to use the C# 3.0 compiler and for extension methods you have to add some metadata to make the compiler happy, but I do this quite frequently myself. –  Tergiver Aug 16 '10 at 15:46

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