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Currently, I'm trying to make a function that sorts a vector full of fighters in the function sortFighters in the Fighter.cpp file. It all seems to compile correctly; However, when it does run, I get a fatal error in one of the lines of the aformentioned .cpp file. I know exactly what the problem is, and put a comment there accordingly. So, what I'm asking here, is what I might do to fix this problem without adding any other functions and such.

Here's my Fighter.h file:

#ifndef FIGHTER_H
#define FIGHTER_H

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>
#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>

class Fighter
{   
protected:
        std::string name;
        int health, level;
        //int damage;
public: 
        int  getHealth(int);
        void getEnemies(std::vector<Fighter> &);
        void printFighter(std::vector<Fighter> &);
        void sortFighters(std::vector<Fighter> &);
        //friend std::istream & operator >> (std::istream & strm, Fighter & x);
        //friend std::ostream & operator << (std::ostream & strm, const Fighter & f);
        //void attack();
        Fighter();
        ~Fighter();
};

class Player : public Fighter 
{ 
    private:
        int experience;
    public:
        int  getHealth(int);
        void pri`enter code here`ntFighter();
        void getExperience(int);
        void playerAttack();    
        Player();
        ~Player();
};

//class FightPub
//{
//  private:
//      Player player;
//      Fighter enemy;
//  public:
//      //void fight();
//      //void getStats();
//};
#endif

My Fighter.cpp file:

//dynamically locate an array that holds the number of fighters, and for each fighter in the array, assign from the .txt 
//file the name and level from the fighter.
#include "Fighter.h"  

#pragma region getEnemies
void Fighter::getEnemies(std::vector<Fighter> &baddie)
{
    Fighter x;
    std::ifstream inputFile;
    inputFile.open("EnemyFighters.txt");
    if(!inputFile)
    {
        std::cout << "error!" << std::endl;
    }
    else
    {
        while(!inputFile.eof())
        {
            std::string line;
            inputFile >> line;
            if (line == "<fighter>")
            {
                do
                {
                    inputFile >> line;
                    x.name = line;
                    inputFile >> line;
                    x.level = atoi(line.c_str());
                    inputFile >> line;
                    x.health = getHealth(this->level);
                    baddie.push_back(x);
                    inputFile >> line;
                }while(line != "</fighter>");
            }                   
        }
        inputFile.close();
    }
}
#pragma endregion

#pragma region getHealth

int Fighter::getHealth(int lv)
{
    if(lv >= 6)
    {
        std::cout << "\nHealth Bonus!";
        this->health = lv * 2;
    }
    /*else if (lv > 1)
        for (int i = 1; i < lv; i++)
        {this->health += 2;}*/
    return health;
}

#pragma endregion

#pragma region attack
//void Fighter::attack()
//{
//  int randomAttack = rand() % 4 + 1;
//
//  switch (randomAttack)
//  case 1: 
//  {
//      std::cout << "Enemy uses critical attack!"
//  }
//}
#pragma endregion

#pragma region printFighter
void Fighter::printFighter(std::vector<Fighter> &baddie)
{
    //std::cout << this;
    for (int i=0; i<baddie.size(); i++)
    {
        std::cout << "\nName: " << baddie[i].name << std::endl
                  << "Level: " << baddie[i].level << std::endl
                  << "Health: " << baddie[i].health << std::endl;
    }
}
#pragma endregion

void Fighter::sortFighters(std::vector<Fighter> &x)
{
    Fighter * temp = new Fighter;
    bool swap;

    do
    {
        swap = false;
        std::cout << x.size() << std::endl;
        for (int i=0; i<=(x.size()); i++)
        {
            //if the level in the first is greater than the level in the next
            if(x[i].level > x[i+1].level)//I get a fatal error here when it tries to compare 
                                         //the iterator with 1 that's outside its range
            {
                //assign the stats from the first to temp
                temp->name = x[i].name;
                temp->health = x[i].health;
                temp->level = x[i].level;
                //assign the stats from the next to the first
                x[i].name = x[i+1].name;
                x[i].health = x[i+1].health;
                x[i].level = x[i+1].level;
                //assign the ones in temp(the first) to the next
                x[i+1].name = temp->name;
                x[i+1].health = temp->health;
                x[i+1].level = temp->level;
                swap = true;
            }

            else if(x[i].level >= x[i+1].level)
            {
                temp->name = x[i].name;
                temp->health = x[i].health;
                temp->level = x[i].level;

                x[i].name = x[i+1].name;
                x[i].health = x[i+1].health;
                x[i].level = x[i+1].level;

                x[i+1].name = temp->name;
                x[i+1].health = temp->health;
                x[i+1].level = temp->level;
                swap = true;
            }

            else if (x[i].level < x[i+1].level)
            {
                //temp->name = x[i].name;
                //temp->health = x[i].health;
                //temp->level = x[i].level;

                //x[i].name = x[i+1].name;
                //x[i].health = x[i+1].health;
                //x[i].level = x[i+1].level;

                //x[i+1].name = temp->name;
                //x[i+1].health = temp->health;
                //x[i+1].level = temp->level;
                swap = false;
            }

            else if(x[i].level <= x[i+1].level)
            {
                /*temp->name = x[i].name;
                temp->health = x[i].health;
                temp->level = x[i].level;

                x[i].name = x[i+1].name;
                x[i].health = x[i+1].health;
                x[i].level = x[i+1].level;

                x[i+1].name = temp->name;
                x[i+1].health = temp->health;
                x[i+1].level = temp->level;*/
                swap = false;
            }
        }
    }while (swap);

    delete temp;
}
//std::istream & operator >>(std::istream & strm, Fighter x)
//{
//  //x.name += strm.c_str();
//  //x.level += atoi(strm.c_str());
//  strm >> x.name;
//  strm >> x.level;
//  return strm;
//}

//std::ostream & operator << (std::ostream & strm, const Fighter f)
//{
//  strm << "Name: " << f.name << std::endl;
//  strm << "Level: " << f.level << std::endl;
//  strm << "Health: " << f.health << std::endl;
//  return strm;
//}
#pragma region Fighter C&D
Fighter::Fighter()
{
    level = 1;
    health = 10;
}
Fighter::~Fighter()
{
}
#pragma endregion
//void operator <()
//{
//}
//
//void operator >()
//{
//}
//
//void operator <=()
//{
//}
//
//void operator >=()
//{
//}
//
//
//
int Player::getHealth(int lv)
{
    if(lv >= 6)
    {
        std::cout << "\nHealth Bonus!";
        this->health = lv * 2;
    }
    /*else if (lv > 1)
        for (int i = 1; i < lv; i++)
        {this->health += 2;}*/
    return health;
}

void Player::printFighter()
{
//std::cout << this;
      std::cout << "\nPlayer's stats: \n"
      << "Level: " << this->level << std::endl
      << "Health: " << this->health << std::endl
      << "Experience: " << this->experience <<std::endl;
}

void Player::getExperience(int dmg)
{
    experience += dmg;
    if (experience >= (level * 10))
    {
        std::cout << "Congratulations, Player! You're up a level!\n";
        level ++;
    }
}

#pragma region Player C&D
Player::Player()
{
    level = 1;
    health  = getHealth(level);
    experience = 0;
}
Player::~Player()
{
}
#pragma endregion 


//Player::printFighter()
//{
//  
//}

And here's main.cpp:

#include "Fighter.h"

int main()
{   
    unsigned seed = time(0);
    srand(seed);

    std::vector<Fighter> baddie;

    Fighter * enemy = new Fighter;
    Player * me = new Player;
    enemy->getEnemies(baddie);
    enemy->sortFighters(baddie);
    enemy->printFighter(baddie);
    me->printFighter();
    delete enemy;
    delete me;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
There is no reason to implement a sorting routine yourself, as you can just use std::sort with a custom predicate. - If you want to swap values, you can use std::swap (BTW, should be overloaded and more efficient for strings). - There is no reason to allocate a temporary dynamically, just use a regular local variable (you also shouldn't need to swap each member individually). - As it is, I also suspect that your logic with the swap variable is wrong (all it takes for the last pair to be in order for the sorting loop to exit). –  UncleBens Aug 16 '10 at 15:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
    for (int i=0; i<=(x.size()); i++) 
    { 
        if(x[i].level > x[i+1].level)
        {

um.. Size() counts from 1. Indexes count from 0. So you'll want to make that i < x.size(), not <=. But, in the very next line, you say x[i+1], so i can't even reach the last item, it has to stop one before that:

    for (int i=0; i < x.size()-1; i++) 
share|improve this answer
1  
True, although i < x.size() - 1 will fail if x.size() == 0. –  Josh Kelley Aug 16 '10 at 15:00
    
Better to use i+1 < x.size() –  Motti Aug 16 '10 at 15:10
    
@josh: How would that fail? At the start, i < size() -1 becomes 0 < -1 so the loop is never entered (as it should not) –  James Curran Aug 16 '10 at 15:25
    
@James: size() is unsigned, so size() - 1 is a very large positive number. –  Josh Kelley Aug 16 '10 at 15:46
1  
@James: Are you sure? Every reference that I can find says that size_type is an implementation-defined unsigned integral type, and in my copy of Visual C++ 2010, it's unsigned. At any rate, avoiding size() - 1 is more portable. –  Josh Kelley Aug 16 '10 at 16:11

You've gotten some advice about how to fix that loop. My advice would be to eliminate it and use std::sort instead.

While we're dealing with loops that don't terminate correctly, however, it's probably also worth mentioning one other (in getEnemies()):

    while(!inputFile.eof())
    {
        std::string line;
        inputFile >> line;
        if (line == "<fighter>")
        {
    // ...

This is broken as well. For the loop to terminate correctly, you need to read the data, and then check whether the read succeeded:

std::string line;

while (inputFile >> line) {
    if (line == "<fighter>") {
         // ...

It's probably also worth noting that this code is pretty fragile -- just for one example, something like: <fighter>fighter1</fighter> will not be read correctly (it requires at least one whitespace before and after <fighter> to read it as a single string).

share|improve this answer
    
The reason for making my own algorithms is to practice my programming logic. For the last paragraph, are you saying that I should add an actual space before and after "<fighter>"? –  Mr. Czar Aug 17 '10 at 18:13

Try Changing your for loop to this

for (int i=0; i < x.size() - 1; i++) {
  ... your original content...
}

This way x[i+1] never goes out of bounds
You were trying to access memory that has not been allocated.

share|improve this answer

Your problem is with this loop:

for (int i=0; i<=(x.size()); i++){ 
    if(x[i].level > x[i+1].level){  //Fatal Error Here 
        // Do some stuff
    }
    // Do some more stuff
}

Your condition for terminating the outer loop is i<=(x.size()) this means that when you do the comparision ( x[i+1].level ) that breaks the program, you are comparing outside the bounds of x. Because if i == x.size() then x[i+1] > x.size()

I reccomend changing your loop to terminate at i<(x.size())-1; rather than i<=(x.size());

share|improve this answer
1  
i < x.size() alone is not enough. because x[i+1] is still out of range at i = x.size() - 1. –  Kenny Cason Aug 16 '10 at 14:51
    
@KennyCason Nothing like monday morning to make me forget that arrays start at index 0 –  James Aug 16 '10 at 14:57
    
hehe. for me nearly every morning feels like that :P –  Kenny Cason Aug 17 '10 at 14:35

The problem, as others have said, is this section of code:

    for (int i=0; i<=(x.size()); i++)
    {
        //if the level in the first is greater than the level in the next
        if(x[i].level > x[i+1].level)//I get a fatal error here when it tries to compare 
                                     //the iterator with 1 that's outside its range

A std::vector can be indexed by values 0 through size() - 1, inclusive. So, for a basic vector loop, you should instead do

for (int i = 0; i < x.size(); i++) {

BUT, in the next line of code, you check element i + 1, so you should instead do

for (int i = 0; i < x.size() - 1; i++) {

BUT, because x.size() is unsigned, if x is empty, then x.size() - 1 will be a very large number (2^32 - 1 on a 32-bit machine). So you should adjust the logic for this. Also, comparing signed values (like int i against unsigned values (like x.size() - 1) may generate compiler warnings (you should turn all such compiler warnings on, if you haven't already done so), so change i to unsigned or size_t:

for (size_t i = 0; i + 1 < x.size(); i++) {

Finally, rather than coding your own bubble sort, it's better to use std::sort. std::sort is faster and more familiar to other C++ developers. Here's an (untested) example of using std::sort:

bool CompareByLevel(const Fighter& a, const Fighter& b) {
    return a.level < b.level;
}

sort(x.begin(), x.end(), CompareByLevel);

Other comments: If you're interested in learning more about C++, here are a few other comments that might help.

inputFile >> line;

This statement actually reads a single whitespace- or newline-separated word into line. If that's what you're trying to do, then your choice of variable name (line) doesn't communicate that. And you may want to be able to use whitespace in fighters' names. To read an entire line, use this: (See here for reference.)

getline(inputFile, line);

getEnemies, printFighter, and sortFighters should be static methods, since they don't need a particular instance of a Fighter to operate on. (Right now, because they're not static methods, you have to create an enemy instance of Fighter in order to call those methods, even though none of those methods do anything with enemy.)

C++ lets you create variables on the stack, instead of dynamically allocating them. In other words, instead of saying

Fighter * temp = new Fighter;

just say

Fighter temp;

This is faster and simpler, if you don't need dynamic allocation.

Finally, C++ will create assignment operators for you that copy all of a class's members. So you could simply write

temp = x[i];

instead of manually assigning each of x's members to temp. Using the assignment operator is more robust, since it will continue to work in the future if you later add members to Fighter.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah... these don't seem to help my program any better. –  Mr. Czar Aug 17 '10 at 17:46

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