Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to perform a check on individual nodes of an XML file, and depending on the contents of a specific node do something, for example if the type is bool display a checkbox or if the type is text display a textarea or a pull down options box.

For example:

<Questions>
<Question>
<Data>What gender are you?</Data>
<Type>pulldown</Type>
</Question>
<Question>
<Data>Do you like Chocolate?</Data>
<Type>checkbox</Type>
</Question>
</Questions>

Thanks in advance

Im not sure if i should be using xsl:choose/xsl:when or xsl:if

share|improve this question
    
Very good question (+1). See my answer for the "XSLT way" of doing what you want -- this is the simplest and recommended way to process nodes of different types and this doesn't require any hardcoded conditional logic. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 16 '10 at 16:25
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

<xsl:choose> can and should always be avoided if possible.

This XSLT transformation demonstrates how to process different Question types in a different way without any hardwired conditional logic:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="Question[Type='pulldown']">
   <!-- Implement pull-down here -->
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="Question[Type='checkbox']">
   <!-- Implement checkbox here -->
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

<xsl:choose> should be aboided due to the same reason that makes us in OOP avoid the switch(type) statement and use virtual functions instead. This makes the code shorter, reduces the possibility of making an error, is tremendously more extendable and maintainable, supports future code even before it is written.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Yes, "pattern matching" is the way to go with declarative language. –  user357812 Aug 16 '10 at 19:54
    
why should xsl:choose be avoided? –  Julio Aug 17 '10 at 8:33
    
@Dan: <xsl:choose should be aboided due to the same reason that makes us in OOP avoid the switch(type) statement and use virtual functions instead. This makes the code shorter, reduces the possibility of making an error, is tremendously more extendable and maintainable, supports future code even before it is written. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 17 '10 at 12:34
add comment

The construct that appears to be most suitable to your needs is xsl:choose:

<xsl:template match="Question">
 <xsl:choose>
  <xsl:when test="Type = 'checkbox'">
      <!-- output checkbox code -->
  </xsl:when>
  <xsl:when test="Type = 'pulldown'">
      <!-- output pulldown code -->
  </xsl:when>
  <xsl:otherwise>
      <!-- output default code -->
  </xsl:otherwise>
 </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
    
sorry that was just a typo –  Julio Aug 16 '10 at 16:03
    
@Dan - fair enough :) –  Oded Aug 16 '10 at 16:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.