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Is there any built-in utility or helper to parse HttpContext.Current.User.Identity.Name, e.g. domain\user to get separately domain name if exists and user?

Or is there any other class to do so?

I understand that it's very easy to call String.Split("\") but just interesting

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1  
It's the simple questions we always forget to ask ourselves. Will look forward to any useful answers to this question. –  Torbjørn Dec 8 '08 at 13:25

8 Answers 8

up vote 47 down vote accepted

This is better (easier to use, no opportunity of NullReferenceExcpetion and conforms MS coding guidelines about treating empty and null string equally):

public static class Extensions
{
    public static string GetDomain(this IIdentity identity)
    {
        string s = identity.Name;
        int stop = s.IndexOf("\\");
        return (stop > -1) ?  s.Substring(0, stop) : string.Empty;
    }

    public static string GetLogin(this IIdentity identity)
    {
        string s = identity.Name;
        int stop = s.IndexOf("\\");
        return (stop > -1) ? s.Substring(stop + 1, s.Length - stop - 1) : string.Empty;
    }
}

Usage:

IIdentity id = HttpContext.Current.User.Identity;
id.GetLogin();
id.GetDomain();

This requires C# 3.0 compiler (or newer) and doesn't require 3.0 .Net for working after compilation.

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4  
Your return statement in GetLogin can be simplified to return s.Substring(stop + 1); –  Sam Harwell Aug 1 '13 at 12:31

I don't think so, because System.Security.Principal.WindowsIdentity doesn't contain such members.

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I think No too, because I asked myself the same question the other day :D

You can try:

public static string GetDomain(string s)
{
    int stop = s.IndexOf("\\");
    return (stop > -1) ? s.Substring(0, stop + 1) : null;
}

public static string GetLogin(string s)
{
    int stop = s.IndexOf("\\");
    return (stop > -1) ? s.Substring(stop + 1, s.Length - stop - 1) : null;
}
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You guys might also consider parsing a string input like "user@company.com", or "user@domain".

This is what I'm currently doing:
If string contains '\' then split string at '\' and extract username and domain
Else If string contains '@' then split string at '@' and extract username and domain
Else treat string as username without a domain

I'm still hunting for a better solution in the case where the input string isn't in an easily predicted format, i.e. "domain\user@domain". I'm thinking RegEx...

Update: I stand corrected. My answer is a bit of out context, it refers to the general case of parsing username and domains out of user input, like in user login/logon prompt. Hope it still helps someone.

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Need an elegant solution for this. I agree. One answer to the domain\user part is this one: stackoverflow.com/a/185716/481656 –  Hassan Gulzar Jun 6 '12 at 8:51

System.Environment.UserDomainName gives you the domain name only

Similarly, System.Environment.UserName gives you the user name only

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2  
> System.Environment.UserDomainName` gives you the domain name only > > Similarly, System.Environment.UserName gives you the user name only This will not work on ASP.NET –  Simon Bastian Aug 23 '11 at 8:03
    
I think it works if you use authentication=Windows and impersonation=true. See - stackoverflow.com/questions/8841816/… –  FMFF Jan 12 '12 at 21:40
var components = User.Identity.Name.Split('\\');

var userName = components.Last() 

var domainName = components.Reverse().Skip(1).FirstOrDefault()
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Seems like a problem made to be solved by regular expressions:

public static class UserExtensions
{
    public static string GetDomain(this IIdentity identity)
    {
        Regex.Match(identity.Name, ".*\\\\").ToString()
    }

    public static string GetLogin(this IIdentity identity)
    {
        return Regex.Replace(identity.Name, ".*\\\\", "");
    }
}
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Isn't using regex an overkill here when simple string manipulating may be used instead? –  abatishchev Aug 1 '13 at 16:24
1  
Sounds like: I have a problem. Let's use regex. Now I have two problems :) –  abatishchev Aug 1 '13 at 16:25
    
A regex solves the problem in one simple line. They're not the right tool for every job but I think in this case the regex solution is more elegant. –  Adam Cooper Aug 1 '13 at 16:55

Although not a .NET built-in, one can always P/Invoke to CredUIParseUserName. Here's a example of how to use it in .NET.

PS: It doesn't seem to handle the "dot", as in ".\username".

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