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I am hoping someone can explain about subclasses accessing variables from the super class.

I found that the subclass can only access variables which are set in the constructor of the super class. Is there any way around this?

package Character {

 import flash.display.MovieClip;

 public class Character extends MovieClip {
  protected var test_declared_early:String = "declared early";
  protected var test_declared_late:String;

  private var knight:Knight;

  public function Character() {
   // constructor code
  }

  public function init(_local_stage:Object){
   test_declared_late = "declared late";
   knight = new Knight("matt");
  }

 }

I try to access the strings in the subclass, but can only get one:

package Character{

 public class Knight extends Character.Character {

  private var myName:String;

  public function Knight(local_name:String) {
   // constructor code
   myName = local_name;
   trace(super.test_declared_early); //this is not null
   trace(super.test_declared_late); //this is null
  }

 }

}

My entire test project can be found here: http://www.mediafire.com/?46zwpfo4h47cdaq

Thanks!

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4 Answers 4

There are a couple of things to note here, Firstly, when accessing a property of a super class, you don't need to do:

super.test_declared_early

Rather just:

test_declared_early

Secondly, the reason test_declared_late is null, is that all Strings have a default value of null. You haven't assigned it a value yet! init must be called, or you need to set it manually.

Happy coding!

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I'm almost positive I am tracing it out after init is called. Here I added a few traces, and show the code where I am calling init:

GameScreen class calls init:

package
{
    import flash.display.MovieClip;

    public class GameScreen extends MovieClip
    {

        public var docClass:Test;
        public function GameScreen(passed_class:Test)
        {
            // constructor code
            docClass = passed_class;
            trace("call init");
            _character.init(this);
        }
    }

}

Character class:

package Character {

    import flash.display.MovieClip;

    public class Character extends MovieClip {
        protected var test_declared_early:String = "declared early";
        protected var test_declared_late:String;

        private var knight:Knight;

        public function Character() {
            // constructor code
        }

        public function init(_local_stage:Object){
            trace("setting late variable");
            test_declared_late = "declared late";
            trace("construct a knight");
            knight = new Knight("matt");
        }

    }

}

Knight subclass:

package Character{

    public class Knight extends Character.Character {

        private var myName:String;

        public function Knight(local_name:String) {
            // constructor code
            myName = local_name;
            trace("in knight constructor, early= " + test_declared_early); //this is not null
            trace("in knight constructor, late= " +test_declared_late); //this is null
        }

    }

}

The output of all this is:

call init
setting late variable
construct a knight
in knight constructor, early= declared early
in knight constructor, late= null

Maybe I'm not understanding what you, but it still looks like I am calling init and setting the variable before I trace it out in the subclass.

Thanks for your help!

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1  
I think there is a fundamental misunderstanding here. 'test_declared_late' is a property of every instance of your class. Everytime you use the 'new' keyword, a new object instance is created. Every object has its own 'test_declared_late' value. You called init on _character, but not on Knight. It is impossible for the value to be set in Knight constructor, unless it has a default value, like test_declared_early does. You could call init from Knights constructor before the trace happens. –  Tyler Egeto Aug 16 '10 at 20:48
    
Ahh...Thanks for hanging with me. I was completely confused about what Knight actually was. I didn't realize that the properties for the characters were not shared. So if I have a Knight and a King, they have their own individual 'test_declared_late' properties. Thanks again! –  Casey87 Aug 16 '10 at 20:55
    
No problem, good luck –  Tyler Egeto Aug 16 '10 at 22:14

Thanks for the tip about not needing super.

However, I didn't make this clear, but another part of the program calls init:

In the GameScreen class:

_character.init(this);

Putting a trace before

test_declared_late = "declared late";

shows it is called. Plus, if init was not called, the code would not get to the knight constructor.

If you had time I would really appreciate it if you could checkout the source http://www.mediafire.com/?46zwpfo4h47cdaq

Thanks!

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The problem is you are tracing out 'test_declared_late' before init gets called. Trace happens in Constructor, init happens after. –  Tyler Egeto Aug 16 '10 at 20:05

I really recommend you to check what private, protected and public means. I will not write a book about OOP in this post so I sugest you check the basics.

What I will do I will give you a sample on how to use and declare variables.

class A
{
    private var _password:String;
    public var username:String;
    protected var serverURL:String;

    public function login():void
    {
         // some code
         callServerForLogin();
    }

    protected function callServerForLogin():void
    { 
        // some code
    }
 }

 class B extends A
 {
      public function B()
      {
           var parentPassword = super._password;  
           // FAILS because private and accessible only inside class A

           var parentUsername = super.username 
           // all ok in here, public property

           var parentServerURL = super.serverURL;
           // all ok, because it is protected

           // also we can call super.login(); or super.callServerForLogin();

      }

      // IMPORTANT we are also allowed to override public and protected functions
      override public function login():void
      {
          super.login(); 
          // we call the parent function to prevent loosing functionality;  

          Alert.show("Login called from class B");
      }

      override protected function callServerForLogin():void
      {
           super.callServerForLogin();
           // keep also parent logic

           Alert.show("calling protected method from B");
      }
 }


 // ----  Now considering you declare an object of type B you can do the following
 var bObj:B = new B();

 // access public properties and call public functions from both B and A
 bObj.username = "superhero";
 bObj.login();

 // will get compile error for next lines
 bObj.serverURL = "host.port";
 bObj.callServerForLogin();
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