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my current solution-pointers would be

  • ether via a iterator class which yields the new assembled inner lists
  • or via a iter function which yields the new assembled inner lists

is there another, better way to solve this challenge?

Edit

@Glenn: good objection. I wasn't thinking of that because I experienced lists not ordered in the manner I thought.

@THC4k: thank you for your solution. I learned chain.from_iterable

@Mike DeSimone: Hmm tested your solution but something went wrong maybe I missed something yet,...

@Jamie and Odomontois: Thank you for pointing out to be more detailed

my goal

I am forging a small algorithm which transforms a list of tasks – pairs/tuples: (start,stop) – to a simplified list of task, where the overlapping tasks merged together.

One exeption: my algorithm fails when one event is completely overlapped by another (s1 s2 e2 e1 )

Detailed:

  • I've a list 'taskList' with pairs (lesson learned - tuples :).
  • each tuple consists of 2 datetimeobjects: start and end of a task.
  • important: the chronology of 'taskList' where the order is determined by start because tasks may overlapp
  • 'taskList' consists several days, therefore datetime objects

Example, just string representation of time for readability

taskList = [(9:00,10:00),(9:30,11:00),(11:00,12:30),(13:30,14:00),(14:00,18:00)]

final endresult :

result = [(9:00,12:30), (13:30,18:00)]

now my thought was, when I rearrange the 'taskList' in the manner I questioned

taskListT1 = [(9:00,),(10:00,9:30),(11:00,11:00),(12:30,13:30),(14:00,14:00),(18:00,)]

now I can eliminate those tuples (a,b) where a >= b:

taskListT2 = [(9:00,),(12:30,13:30),(18:00,)]

and transform back:

result = [(9:00,12:30), (13:30,18:00)]
share|improve this question
2  
You're going to have to provide more examples of input/output for us to have any idea what you want done – Jamie Wong Aug 16 '10 at 19:37
    
Iterate over them and copy. Trying to figure out exactly what "Trick" will make something like this work is just horrific. Every minute you spend trying to figure out a cool solution is a minute EVERYONE who EVER touches your code in the future will have to spend deciphering your little trick. If it's not just automatic for you when you are programming, don't do it. If you are so comfortable with a pattern that it's automatic, then you will probably also have the knowledge to know when to use it and when to be more explicit. – Bill K Aug 16 '10 at 19:39
    
what if some nested list length > 2 ? – mykhal Aug 16 '10 at 19:39
1  
Are you sure you shouldn't just be storing a flat list, [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8], and varying how you iterate over them rather than converting the list back and forth? – Glenn Maynard Aug 16 '10 at 20:24
    
wow this question has changed since I first looked at it. – aaronasterling Aug 17 '10 at 7:36

Well, here is the solutions with yield:

# transform forwards
def transform_pairs( lst ):
    it = iter(lst)
    a,last = next(it)
    yield [a]
    for a,b in it:
        yield last, a
        last = b
    yield [last]

Transforming the list back should look very similar, but I'll leave that to the reader.

Here is another slightly more complicated one that can transform in both directions. It yield tuples because lists of fixed length are lame.

from itertools import chain

def transform( iterable, offset):
    it = chain.from_iterable(iterable) # turn it back to one long list.
    if offset:
        yield next(it), # the trailing `,` makes this a tuple.
    for item in it:
        try:
            x = next(it)
        except StopIteration: # there is no 2nd item left
            yield item,
        else:
             yield item, x # yield the pair

print list(transform(transform([[1,2],[3,4],[5,6],[7,8]], True), False))
share|improve this answer

Going for the 'another, better way' option (even gets the OP's exception correct):

def compress_task_list(tasks):
    tasks = list(tasks)
    tasks.sort(key=lambda item: item[0]) # make sure list is in order by start time
    result = []
    first_start = tasks[0][0]
    final_stop = tasks[0][1]
    for start, stop in tasks[1:]:
        if start > final_stop:
            result.append((first_start, final_stop))
            first_start = start
            final_stop = stop
        elif stop > final_stop:
            final_stop = stop
    result.append((first_start, final_stop))
    return tuple(result)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import unittest

    class Test_Compress_Task_List(unittest.TestCase):
        def test_01(self):
            "completely separate"
            initial = ((8.0, 9.5), (10.0, 12.0), (13.0, 15.5), (16.0, 17.0))
            expected = ((8.0, 9.5), (10.0, 12.0), (13.0, 15.5), (16.0, 17.0))
            self.assertEqual(compress_task_list(initial), expected)
        def test_02(self):
            "end equals start"
            initial = ((8.0, 9.5), (9.5, 12.0), (13.0, 15.5), (15.5, 17.0))
            expected = ((8.0, 12.0), (13.0, 17.0))
            self.assertEqual(compress_task_list(initial), expected)
        def test_03(self):
            "end equals start (with more empty times)"
            initial = ((8.0, 8.5), (8.5, 10.0), (10.25, 12.0), (12.5, 13.75), (13.75, 15.0), (15.25, 16.0), (16.0, 17.0))
            expected = ((8.0, 10.0), (10.25, 12.0), (12.5, 15.0), (15.25, 17.0))
            self.assertEqual(compress_task_list(initial), expected)
        def test_04(self):
            "out of order, cross-overs, and tasks completely inside other tasks"
            initial = ((8.0, 8.5), (8.0, 10.0), (10.25, 12.0), (10.0, 11.5), (13.0, 15.5), (14.0, 15.0), (16.0, 17.0))
            expected = ((8.0, 12.0), (13.0, 15.5), (16.0, 17.0))
            self.assertEqual(compress_task_list(initial), expected)

    unittest.main()

Remember, this is Python, and readability counts. ;)

share|improve this answer

This works, but it feels like something more Pythonic is out there:

l = [[1,2], [3,4], [5,6], [7,8]]
o = []
last = []
for a, b in l:
    o.append(last+[a])
    last = [b]
o.append(last)

print o

prints

[[1], [2, 3], [4, 5], [6, 7], [8]]

This body also works:

o = [[l[0][0]]]
for i in range(len(l)-1):
    o.append([l[i][1], l[i+1][0]])
o.append([l[-1][1]])
share|improve this answer
3  
Ahhhhhh! One letter variable names!!! – mattbasta Aug 16 '10 at 19:49
1  
Yeah, I made sure to use i, l, and 1 all in there also, for maximum readability! (jk) – Ned Batchelder Aug 16 '10 at 20:01
1  
You didn't use _. Perl folks love that one. – Mike DeSimone Aug 16 '10 at 22:29
l = [[1,2], [3,4], [5,6], [7,8]]
m = [([] if i==0 else [l[i-1][1]] )+([] if i==len(l) else [l[i][0]]) for i in xrange(len(l)+1)]
share|improve this answer
1  
I hope this is a joke. – Glenn Maynard Aug 16 '10 at 20:18
4  
@Glenn Maynard meaningfulness of the answer was adapted to meaningfulness of the question. – Odomontois Aug 16 '10 at 20:32

Do you mean:

pairs = [[1,2], [3,4], [5,6], [7,8]]
print pairs, '->',
transformed = ([[pairs[0][0]]]+
               [[a,b] for a,b in zip(
                   (second for first, second in pairs[:-1]),
                   (first for first, second in pairs[1:]))]+
               [[pairs[-1][-1]]]
               )
print transformed
""" Output:
[[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6], [7, 8]] -> [[1], [2, 3], [4, 5], [6, 7], [8]]
"""
share|improve this answer

This is a generator that can work with a generator or list input, so you don't have to keep everything in memory:

def shift_pairs(inPairs):
    lastPair = None
    for pair in inPairs:
        if lastPair:
            yield [lastPair[1], pair[0]]
        else:
            yield [pair[0]]
        lastPair = pair
    yield [lastPair[1]]

I must point out that, in Python, lists of short, fixed length are usually done as tuples:

def shift_pairs(inPairs):
    lastPair = None
    for pair in inPairs:
        if lastPair:
            yield (lastPair[1], pair[0])
        else:
            yield (pair[0],)
        lastPair = pair
    yield (lastPair[1],)
share|improve this answer

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