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I'm trying to check whether a $_POST exists and if it does, print it inside another string, if not, don't print at all.

something like this:

$fromPerson = '+from%3A'.$_POST['fromPerson'];

function fromPerson() {
    if !($_POST['fromPerson']) {
        print ''
    } else {
        print $fromPerson
    };
}

$newString = fromPerson();

Any help would be great!

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12 Answers 12

up vote 68 down vote accepted
if( isset($_POST['fromPerson']) )
{
     $fromPerson = '+from%3A'.$_POST['fromPerson'];
     echo $fromPerson;
}
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Everyone is saying to use isset() - which will probably work for you.

However, it's important that you understand the difference between

$_POST['x'] = NULL; and $_POST['x'] = '';

isset($_POST['x']) will return false on the first example, but will return true on the second one even though if you tried to print either one, both would return a blank value.

If your $_POST is coming from a user-inputted field/form and is left blank, I BELIEVE (I am not 100% certain on this though) that the value will be "" but NOT NULL.

Even if that assumption is incorrect (someone please correct me if I'm wrong!) the above is still good to know for future use.

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this also helped! thanks –  eliwedel Aug 16 '10 at 23:19
    
empty() checks for variable existence and a non-empty value, so that's the function to use when an empty string should return false. –  Han Dijk Jul 30 '13 at 13:11
isset($_POST['fromPerson']) 
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Surprised it has not been mentioned

if($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] == 'POST' && isset($_POST['fromPerson'])){
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Simple. You've two choices:

1. Check if there's ANY post data at all

if (!empty($_POST)) {
    // handle post data
    $fromPerson = '+from%3A'.$_POST['fromPerson'];
    echo $fromPerson;
}

(OR)

2. Only check if a PARTICULAR Key is available in post data

if( isset($_POST['fromPerson']) )
{
     $fromPerson = '+from%3A'.$_POST['fromPerson'];
     echo $fromPerson;
}
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  • In that case using method isset is not appropriate.

According to PHP documentation: http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-key-exists.php
(see Example #2 array_key_exists() vs isset())
The method array_key_exists is intended for checking key presence in array.

So code in the question could be changed as follow:

function fromPerson() {
   if (array_key_exists('fromPerson', $_POST) == FALSE) {
        return '';
   } else {
        return '+from%3A'.$_POST['fromPerson'];
   };
}

$newString = fromPerson();


  • Checking presence of array $_POST is not necessary because it is PHP environment global variable since version 4.1.0 (nowadays we does not meet older versions of PHP).
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if (is_array($_POST) && array_key_exists('fromPerson', $_POST)) {
    echo 'blah' . $_POST['fromPerson'];
}
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Does is_array($_POST) check if there are any values at all in POST? In my app I'm trying to determine if there was a post or not before doing anything else. –  jlafay Feb 9 '11 at 2:49
    
See my edit. is_array() checks whether it's an array, the second part checks whether it has an item with the key 'fromPerson'. –  jezmck Feb 10 '11 at 9:07

Try isset($_POST['fromPerson'])?

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All the methods are actually discouraged, it's a warning in Netbeans 7.4 and it surely is a good practice not to access superglobal variables directly, use a filter instead

$fromPerson = filter_input(INPUT_POST, 'fromPerson', FILTER_DEFAULT);
if($fromPerson === NULL) { /*$fromPerson is not present*/ }
else{ /*present*/ }
var_dump($fromPerson);exit(0);
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if( isset($_POST['fromPerson']) ) is right.

You can use a function and return, better then directing echo.

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Try

if (isset($_POST['fromPerson']) && $_POST['fromPerson'] != "") {
    echo "Cool";
}
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1  
wrong curves: $_POST('fromPerson') => $_POST['fromPerson'] –  paka Dec 3 '13 at 13:50

this is easy and simple for you

if( $_POST) {
    ///do what you want to get from your post .
}
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3  
Seeing as $_POST is always set, this will always be executed and thus serves no purpose. –  Willem P. Botha Sep 24 '14 at 7:41

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