Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I frequently make use of Request.QueryString[] variables.

In my Page_load I often do things like:

       int id = -1;

        if (Request.QueryString["id"] != null) {
            try
            {
                id = int.Parse(Request.QueryString["id"]);
            }
            catch
            {
                // deal with it
            }
        }

        DoSomethingSpectacularNow(id);

It all seems a bit clunky and rubbish. How do you deal with your Request.QueryString[]s?

share|improve this question

11 Answers 11

up vote 41 down vote accepted

Below is an extension method that will allow you to write code like this:

int id = request.QueryString.GetValue<int>("id");
DateTime date = request.QueryString.GetValue<DateTime>("date");

It makes use of TypeDescriptor to perform the conversion. Based on your needs, you could add an overload which takes a default value instead of throwing an exception:

public static T GetValue<T>(this NameValueCollection collection, string key)
{
    if(collection == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("collection");
    }

    var value = collection[key];

    if(value == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("key");
    }

    var converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(T));

    if(!converter.CanConvertFrom(typeof(string)))
    {
        throw new ArgumentException(String.Format("Cannot convert '{0}' to {1}", value, typeof(T)));
    }

    return (T) converter.ConvertFrom(value);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I had to change line 15 and 17 to made this work : var converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(T)); if (!converter.CanConvertTo(value.GetType())) –  lucian.jp Feb 17 '09 at 22:01
    
Thank you Bryan –  Barbaros Alp Aug 23 '09 at 1:00
    
Hi, thats pretty nice however it doesn't work with nullables, e.g int? There may be a bug in type converter? Worth testing if you are interested. –  bplus Sep 11 '09 at 9:55
    
I am using this code right now in a project, and we have Request.QueryString.GetValue<int?>("someValue") in many places and it works just fine. Is that syntax what you meant? –  Bryan Watts Sep 11 '09 at 15:11
    
Very useful, thanks. –  Marc Apr 3 at 9:17

Use int.TryParse instead to get rid of the try-catch block:

if (!int.TryParse(Request.QueryString["id"], out id))
{
  // error case
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks buddy, that's the kind of tip I needed :D –  inspite Dec 8 '08 at 14:42
    
Yeah, TryParse is great! –  Sean Hanley Dec 8 '08 at 15:05
    
Excellent idea... –  Zo Has Feb 7 '12 at 11:39

I'm using a little helper method:

public static int QueryString(string paramName, int defaultValue)
{
    int value;
    if (!int.TryParse(Request.QueryString[paramName], out value))
    	return defaultValue;
    return value;
}

This method allows me to read values from the query string in the following way:

int id = QueryString("id", 0);
share|improve this answer
    
What a great idea for a helper method to put in a class library! –  Mitchel Sellers Dec 8 '08 at 14:56
    
Yes I like it too ;D –  inspite Dec 8 '08 at 14:59
    
In fact there's an error inside the method. Instead of "Request.QueryString" it should be "HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString". –  M4N Dec 8 '08 at 17:11

Try this dude...

List<string> keys = new List<string>(Request.QueryString.AllKeys);

Then you will be able to search the guy for a string real easy via...

keys.Contains("someKey")
share|improve this answer
1  
Whoa. Yes. Fantastic. +1 –  Brandon Sep 30 '10 at 13:38
1  
Great! Easy, fast and what I needed! +1 Simple is the way I like it. –  Mixxiphoid Aug 14 '11 at 20:55

Well for one thing use int.TryParse instead...

int id;
if (!int.TryParse(Request.QueryString["id"], out id))
{
    id = -1;
}

That assumes that "not present" should have the same result as "not an integer" of course.

EDIT: In other cases, when you're going to use request parameters as strings anyway, I think it's definitely a good idea to validate that they're present.

share|improve this answer

You can use the extension methods below as well and do like this

int? id = Request["id"].ToInt();
if(id.HasValue)
{

}

// Extension methods

public static int? ToInt(this string input) 
{
    int val;
    if (int.TryParse(input, out val))
        return val;
    return null;
}

public static DateTime? ToDate(this string input)
{
    DateTime val;
    if (DateTime.TryParse(input, out val))
        return val;
    return null;
}

public static decimal? ToDecimal(this string input)
{
    decimal val;
    if (decimal.TryParse(input, out val))
        return val;
    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty smart I like it. Thanks –  inspite Dec 8 '08 at 15:43
1  
We use this technique, but have non-nullable versions, e.g. "int ToInt(int defaultValue = 0)" and "int? AsInt()" –  Jerph Feb 4 '13 at 15:16
    
@Jerph's suggestion is pretty good, but you can also use the above as Request["id"].ToInt().GetValueOrDefault(0) to get the same effect. –  Andrew Coonce Oct 22 '13 at 16:22
if(!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Request.QueryString["id"]))
{
//querystring contains id
}
share|improve this answer
    
what if user messes up like page.aspx?id=123 to page.aspx?1234 –  Zo Has Feb 7 '12 at 11:38
    
@DamienJoe Then the user should get a 404. –  Dan Lugg May 17 '13 at 13:23
    
@DamienJoe: Why would the user be typing the query string parameters in manually, shouldn't they only be clicking the (well-formed) links that you give them? –  Andrew Coonce Oct 22 '13 at 16:23

Eeee this is a karma risk...

I have a DRY unit-testable abstraction because, well, because there were too many querystring variables to keep on in a legacy conversion.

The code below is from a utility class whose constructor requires a NameValueCollection input (this.source) and the string array "keys" is because the legacy app was rather organic and had developed the possibility for several different strings to be a potential input key. However I kind of like the extensibility. This method inspects the collection for the key and returns it in the datatype required.

private T GetValue<T>(string[] keys)
{
    return GetValue<T>(keys, default(T));
}

private T GetValue<T>(string[] keys, T vDefault)
{
    T x = vDefault;

    string v = null;

    for (int i = 0; i < keys.Length && String.IsNullOrEmpty(v); i++)
    {
    	v = this.source[keys[i]];
    }

    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(v))
    {
    	try
    	{
    		x = (typeof(T).IsSubclassOf(typeof(Enum))) ? (T)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), v) : (T)Convert.ChangeType(v, typeof(T));
    	}
    	catch(Exception e)
    	{
    		//do whatever you want here
    	}
    }

    return x;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty much the same as what I use.. :) –  Rob Cooper Dec 8 '08 at 14:59

I actually have a utility class that uses Generics to "wrap" session, which does all of the "grunt work" for me, I also have something almost identical for working with QueryString values.

This helps remove the code dupe for the (often numerous) checks..

For example:

public class QueryString
{
    static NameValueCollection QS
    {
        get
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current == null)
                throw new ApplicationException("No HttpContext!");

            return HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString;
        }
    }

    public static int Int(string key)
    {
        int i; 
        if (!int.TryParse(QS[key], out i))
            i = -1; // Obviously Change as you see fit.
        return i;
    }

    // ... Other types omitted.
}

// And to Use..
void Test()
{
    int i = QueryString.Int("test");
}

NOTE:

This obviously makes use of statics, which some people don't like because of the way it can impact test code.. You can easily refactor into something that works based on instances and any interfaces you require.. I just think the statics example is the lightest.

Hope this helps/gives food for thought.

share|improve this answer

I do have functions for each (actually it's one small class, with lots of statics):

  • GetIntegerFromQuerystring(val)
  • GetIntegerFromPost(val)
  • ....

It returns -1 if fails (which is almost always OK for me, I have some other functions for negative numbers as well).

Dim X as Integer = GetIntegerFromQuerystring("id")
If x = -1 Then Exit Sub
share|improve this answer

I modified Bryan Watts' answer so that if the param your asking does not exist and you have specified a nullable type it will return null :

public static T GetValue<T>(this NameValueCollection collection, string key)
    {
        if (collection == null)
        {
            return default(T);
        }

        var value = collection[key];

        if (value == null)
        {
           return default(T);
        }

        var type = typeof(T);

        if (type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
        {
            type = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type);
        }

        var converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(type);

        if (!converter.CanConvertTo(value.GetType()))
        {
            return default(T);
        }

        return (T)converter.ConvertTo(value, type);
    }

You can now do this :

Request.QueryString.GetValue<int?>(paramName) ?? 10;
share|improve this answer
    
'Int32Converter' is unable to convert 'System.String' to 'System.Nullable`1[[System.Int32, mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089]]'. –  Soonts Oct 30 '10 at 19:38
1  
Thanks @Soonts for the comment, I changed the code a little to handle Nullables. –  W3Max Jun 27 '12 at 1:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.