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I want to add a setTimeout to the following code so that there's a short pause before the fadeOut effect executes.

$(document).ready(function() {  
    $('#menu li').hover(
        function() {
            $('ul', this).slideDown(50);
        }, 
        function() {
            $('ul', this).fadeOut(100);
        }
    );
});

This is what I'm trying, but I'm guessing the syntax must be wrong:

$(document).ready(function() {  
    $('#menu li').hover(
        function() {
            $('ul', this).slideDown(50);
        },
        function() {
            setTimeout(function() {
                $('ul,' this).fadeOut(100);
            });
        }
    );
});

Sorry if this is a dumb question. I'm a beginner with jQuery.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could also need to clear the timeout when going over it using clearTimeout() (in case you hover in/out fast), something like this would work:

$(function() {  
  $('#menu li').hover(function() {
    clearTimeout($.data(this, 'timer'));
    $('ul', this).slideDown(50);
  }, function() {
    $.data(this, 'timer', setTimeout($.proxy(function() {
      $('ul,' this).fadeOut(100);
    }, this), 400));
  });
});

This stores/retrieves the timer ID using $.data(), and currently has a 400ms delay, just adjust accordingly.

share|improve this answer
    
This works! Thanks! –  Tom Aug 16 '10 at 23:15
    
Is there an opposite of "this"? Might there be a way to fadeOut all other ul's when the one you're on is on slideDown? –  Tom Aug 16 '10 at 23:23
    
@Tom - You can use .not() for example: $('#menu li').not(this).find('ul') to get all other child <ul> elements. –  Nick Craver Aug 16 '10 at 23:25
    
Thanks, Nick. I had to add some classes to differentiate between the different levels of ul's and li's, but that worked for me. Thanks again! –  Tom Aug 17 '10 at 19:47
    
@Tom - Welcome :) You can also do $(this).children('ul') to go one a level down instead of $('ul', this), if that helps any :) –  Nick Craver Aug 17 '10 at 19:55

The meaning of this is different within a setTimeout(). You need to reference the desired this in a variable or get the ul first and reference that.

var th = this;
setTimeout(function() {
    $('ul', th).fadeOut(100);
});

or

var $ul = $('ul',this);
setTimeout(function() {
    $ul.fadeOut(100);
});
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - Good catch on this, $.proxy() is also an alternative here to maintain context. –  Nick Craver Aug 16 '10 at 21:49
    
@Nick - Thanks. Why do I always forget about $.proxy()?! –  user113716 Aug 16 '10 at 21:50

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