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Is there a way to add all files no matter what you do to them whether it be deleted, untracked, etc? like for a commit. I just don't want to have to git add or git rm all my files every time I commit, especially when I'm working on a large product.

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7 Answers 7

Try:

git add -A

Warning, starting git 2.0 (mid 2013), this will always stage files on the all working tree.
If you want to stage file only under your current path with that working tree, then you need to use

$ git add -A .

See "Difference of “git add -A” and “git add .".

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this did not work for me... how can i show my terminal input-output in this discussion? copy-paste my terminal output as an answer to this discussion? –  syedrakib Oct 11 '11 at 12:29
    
here is the problem i am facing - stackoverflow.com/q/7726131/636762 - kindly help me on this one please –  syedrakib Oct 11 '11 at 12:41
    
This can also not work if your git version is old. I was running a script on a server that was running git 1.5.2.5. git add -A was not working. From the script, no error message was reported. Only from the command line did I find that -A was not a legal option to add. –  Eponymous Jan 16 '12 at 16:37
    
Perfecto. Superb –  QuiteNothing Oct 31 '13 at 20:36

Try

git add -u

The "u" option stands for update. This will update the repo and actually delete files from the repo that you have deleted in your local copy.

git add -u [filename]

to stage a delete to just one file. Once pushed, the file will no longer be in the repo.

Alternatively,

git add -A .

is equivalent to

git add .

git add -u .

Note the extra '.' on git add -A and git add -u


Warning, starting git 2.0 (mid 2013), git add -A|u (not extra dot) will always stage files on the all working tree.
If you want to stage file only under your current path with that working tree, then you need to use

$ git add -A .

See "Difference of “git add -A” and “git add .".

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I'm quite certain this is not what the OP asked –  SlashV Jun 4 '12 at 23:47
1  
"i just dont want to have to git add or git rm all my files every time i commit" --This was the part of the question I was answering. –  Matt Kneiser Jun 11 '12 at 21:41

You want git add -A:

git add -A stages All;

git add . stages new and modified, without deleted;

git add -u stages modified and deleted, without new.

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I'm not sure if it will add deleted files, but git add . from the root will add all untracked files.

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this did not work for me... here is the problem i am facing with git add . - stackoverflow.com/q/7726131/636762 - kindly help me on this one please –  syedrakib Oct 11 '11 at 12:44
    
see my answer on how to add deleted files –  Matt Kneiser Feb 18 '13 at 17:15
git add .

there is a space between add and the '.' (dot in word). It does the work.:)

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git add . stages new and modified, without deleted - stackoverflow.com/questions/572549/… –  Zach L Mar 13 '13 at 21:21

This is my alternative (in any bash):

$ git status -s|awk '{ print $2 }'|xargs git add

To reset

$ git status -s|awk '{ print $2 }'|xargs git reset HEAD
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I authored the G2 project, a friendly environment for the command line git lover.
Please get the project from github - G2 https://github.com/orefalo/g2

It has a bunch of handy commands, one of them being exactly what your are looking for: freeze

freeze - Freeze all files in the repository (additions, deletions, modifications) to the staging area, thus staging that content for inclusion in the next commit. Also accept a specific path as parameter

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At first I was like...what is this, a self-plug?! Then I looked over it and thought it was pretty cool. +1 –  Droogans Feb 28 '13 at 0:14
    
Its generally good practice to when posting to external links to disclose if you are the other. Also, would be nice to describe what freeze does here rather than making us go look for it. Do that ad you have my +1 –  Zach L Mar 13 '13 at 21:20
    
done cheers. thank you –  Olivier Refalo Mar 14 '13 at 17:52

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