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I am working on a personal project that uses a custom config file. The basic format of the file looks like this:

[users]
name: bob
attributes:
    hat: brown
    shirt: black
another_section:
    key: value
    key2: value2

name: sally
sex: female
attributes:
    pants: yellow
    shirt: red

There can be an arbitrary number of users and each can have different key/value pairs and there can be nested keys/values under a section using tab-stops. I know that I can use json, yaml, or even xml for this config file, however, I'd like to keep it custom for now.

Parsing shouldn't be difficult at all as I have already written code to do parse it. My question is, what is the best way to go about parsing this using clean and structured code as well as writing in a way that won't make changes in the future difficult (there might be multiple nests in the future). Right now, my code looks utterly disgusting. For example,

private void parseDocument() {  
    String current;
    while((current = reader.readLine()) != null) {
        if(current.equals("") || current.startsWith("#")) {
            continue; //comment
        } 
        else if(current.startsWith("[users]")) {
            parseUsers();
        }
        else if(current.startsWith("[backgrounds]")) {
            parseBackgrounds();
        }
    }
}

private void parseUsers()  {        
    String current;
    while((current = reader.readLine()) != null) {
        if(current.startsWith("attributes:")) {
            while((current = reader.readLine()) != null) {
                if(current.startsWith("\t")) {
                    //add user key/values to User object
                }
                else if(current.startsWith("another_section:")) {
                    while((current = reader.readLine()) != null) {
                        if(current.startsWith("\t")) {
                            //add user key/values to new User object
                        } 
                        else if (current.equals("")) {
                            //newline means that a new user is up to parse next
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        else if(!current.isEmpty()) {
            //
        }


    }
}

As you can see, the code is pretty messy, and I have cut it short for the presentation here. I feel there are better ways to do this as well maybe not using BufferedReader. Can someone please provide possibly a better way or approach that is not as convoluted as mine?

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1  
I'll just add this as a comment since I'm not really answering your question in regards to that particular config setup. As this is a personal project, is it feasible to change to something like XML? Then you could use something like JAXP. –  JBirch Aug 17 '10 at 0:27
1  
Christ what is it with Java developers and XML? Cletus' suggestion of YAML is spot on because that is what the OP's configuration looks most like. You'd know this if you expanded your horizons through Ruby on Rails or even the PHP framework Symfony. I'm a Java developer too, and this constant reliance on XML by most other Java developers is somewhere between comical and pathetic. I once showed a micro MVC framework I've developed to a Java "architect" and he remarked "Where's the mapping", by which he meant XML. Better question: why can't other formats be used to populate map(ping)s? –  George Jempty Aug 17 '10 at 0:50
    
In a few comments you state that the braces, brackets, quotes, etc of standard formats are too much clutter. I just wanted to point out that there is a good reason for that "clutter". Currently you are depending on tabs, which is really brittle. What happens when someone opens the config file in something that converts tabs to spaces? Minimally, you should support spaces there as well. –  Cheryl Simon Aug 17 '10 at 1:28
    
I didn't say there weren't other things that wouldn't work for his purpose, nor did I say XML is the best thing ever and Java programmers shouldn't use anything else ever. Cletus' suggestion is spot on, and you'll notice that I did put a caveat that I wasn't really answering the OP's question specifically. OP Even mentions YAML/XML in his post. I'm not sure why you've blown up on me like that - XML is just another tool one can choose to use. –  JBirch Aug 17 '10 at 1:37
    
@JBirch nothing personal, it was that half or more of the suggestions were XML, and I for one and sick and tired of the conflation of Java with XML. Yes XML is another tool and has its place, but when XML is one's favorite hammer/tool, every problem begins to look like a thumb. –  George Jempty Aug 17 '10 at 13:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Everyone will recommend using XML because it's simply better.

However, in case you're on a quest to prove your programmer's worth to yourself...

...there is nothing really fundamentally wrong with the code you posted in the sense that it's clear and it's obvious to potential readers what's going on, and unless I'm totally out of the loop on file operations, it should perform pretty much as well as it could.

The one criticism I could offer is that it's not recursive. Every level requires a new level of code to support. I would probably make a recursive function (a function that calls itself with sub-content as parameter and then again if there's sub-sub-content etc.), that could be called, reading all of this stuff into a hashtable with hashtables or something, and then I'd use that hashtable as a configuration object.

Then again, at that point I would probably stop seeing the point and use XML. ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer Helgi. The quote, "However, in case you're on a quest to prove your programmer's worth to yourself..." was pretty applicable in this case. I will consider your advice about making this more recursive. So far, your post has been most helpful for me but I'll wait just a bit more though, before I make this my answer ;) –  trinth Aug 17 '10 at 1:00

I would suggest not creating custom code for config files. What you're proposing isn't too far removed from YAML (getting started). Use that instead.

See Which java YAML library should I use?

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As commented on codemeit's answer, I had considered YAML in the beginning, but needed the config file to be extremely simplistic in nature. –  trinth Aug 17 '10 at 1:03
    
@trinth I don't know why exactly you think YAML is heavyweight. It's as lightweight as your data is. I stand by my recommendation; better to fit your data into an existing model than to needlessly invent your own configuration format with corresponding libraries. –  cletus Aug 17 '10 at 2:59

It looks simple enough for a state machine.

while((current = reader.readLine()) != null) {
  if(current.startsWith("[users]"))
    state = PARSE_USER;
  else if(current.startsWith("[backgrounds]"))
    state = PARSE_BACKGROUND;
  else if (current.equals("")) {
    // Store the user or background that you've been building up if you have one.
    switch(state) {
      case PARSE_USER:
      case USER_ATTRIBUTES:
      case USER_OTHER_ATTRIBUTES:
        state = PARSE_USER;
        break;
      case PARSE_BACKGROUND:
      case BACKGROUND_ATTRIBUTES:
      case BACKGROUND_OTHER_ATTRIBUTES:
        state = PARSE_BACKGROUND;
        break;
    }
  } else switch(state) {
    case PARSE_USER:
    case USER_ATTRIBUTES:
    case USER_OTHER_ATTRIBUTES:
      if(current.startsWith("attributes:"))
        state = USER_ATTRIBUTES;
      else if(current.startsWith("another_section:"))
        state = USER_OTHER_ATTRIBUTES;
      else {
        // Split the line into key/value and store into user
        // object being built up as appropriate based on state.
      }
      break;
    case PARSE_BACKGROUND:
    case BACKGROUND_ATTRIBUTES:
    case BACKGROUND_OTHER_ATTRIBUTES:
      if(current.startsWith("attributes:"))
        state = BACKGROUND_ATTRIBUTES;
      else if(current.startsWith("another_section:"))
        state = BACKGROUND_OTHER_ATTRIBUTES;
      else {
        // Split the line into key/value and store into background
        // object being built up as appropriate based on state.
      }
      break;
  }
}
// If you have an unstored object, store it.
share|improve this answer

If you could utilise XML or JSON or other well-known data encoding as the data format, it will be a lot easier to parse/deserialize the text content and extract the values. For example.

name: bob
attributes:
    hat: brown
    shirt: black
another_section:
    key: value
    key2: value2

Can be Expressed as the follow XML (there are other options to express it in XML as well)

<config>
  <User hat="brown" shirt="black" >
    <another_section>
      <key>value</key>
      <key2>value</key2>
    </another_section>
  </User>
</config>

Custom ( Extremely simple ) As I mentioned in the comment below, you can just make them all name and value pairs. e.g.

name                 :bob
attributes_hat       :brown
attributes_shirt     :black
another_section_key  :value
another_section_key2 :value2

and then do string split on '\n' (newline) and ':' to extract the key and value or build a dictionary/map object.

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The OP's data format looks remarkably like YAML. All other suggested data formats are moot. –  George Jempty Aug 17 '10 at 0:51
1  
Yep, I had initially chosen YAML for the project, however, I didn't think the syntax would be appropriate. The config file needs to be as simplistic as can be and XML and JSON was too verbose and YAML still didn't make the cut. –  trinth Aug 17 '10 at 1:02
    
In that case you can just make them all name and value pair. e.g. name:bob;attributes_hat:brown;attributes_shirt:black;another_section_key:value;a‌​nother_section_key2:value2 and then do string split on ';' and ':' –  codemeit Aug 17 '10 at 1:22

I'd recommend changing the configuration file's format to JSON and using an existing library to parse the JSON objects such as FlexJSON.

{
"users": [
    {
        "name": "bob",
        "hat": "brown",
        "shirt": "black",
        "another_section": {
            "key": "value",
            "key2": "value2" 
        } 
    },
    {
        "name": "sally",
        "sex": "female",
        "another_section": {
            "pants": "yellow",
            "shirt": "red" 
        } 
    } 
] 

}

share|improve this answer
    
id love to use json but the braces, brackets, and quotes are too much of a clutter and i'd like to keep the config file simple –  trinth Aug 17 '10 at 0:56
2  
I understand. What if you select a standard file format (such as JSON or XML), but instead provide a user interface for editing the file? This way you can hide the complexity from your users, extend it more easily and reduce maintenance costs overtime. Moreover, this will keep your users focusing on the data instead of the config file syntax. –  johnnieb Aug 17 '10 at 4:36

A nice way to clean it up would be to use a table, i.e. replace your conditionals with a Map. You can then invoke you parsing methods through reflection (simple) or create a few more classes implementing a common interface (more work but more robust).

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