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Is there anything built into the core C# libraries that can give me an immutable Dictionary?

Something along the lines of Java's:

Collections.unmodifiableMap(myMap);

And just to clarify, I am not looking to stop the keys / values themselves from being changed, just the structure of the Dictionary. I want something that fails fast and loud if any of IDictionary's mutator methods are called (Add, Remove, Clear).

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4  
It seems like ReadOnlyDictionary<TKey,TValue> will be added in .Net 4.5 as a parallel to the ReadOnlyCollection<T> that has been present since .Net 2.0 msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/jj133817.aspx –  Gordon Gustafson Jun 13 '12 at 23:25
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13 Answers

up vote 43 down vote accepted

No, but a wrapper is rather trivial:

public class ReadOnlyDictionary<TKey, TValue> : IDictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
    IDictionary<TKey, TValue> _dict;

    public ReadOnlyDictionary(IDictionary<TKey, TValue> backingDict)
    {
        _dict = backingDict;
    }

    public void Add(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException();
    }

    public bool ContainsKey(TKey key)
    {
        return _dict.ContainsKey(key);
    }

    public ICollection<TKey> Keys
    {
        get { return _dict.Keys; }
    }

    public bool Remove(TKey key)
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException();
    }

    public bool TryGetValue(TKey key, out TValue value)
    {
        return _dict.TryGetValue(key, out value);
    }

    public ICollection<TValue> Values
    {
        get { return _dict.Values; }
    }

    public TValue this[TKey key]
    {
        get { return _dict[key]; }
        set { throw new InvalidOperationException(); }
    }

    public void Add(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item)
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException();
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException();
    }

    public bool Contains(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item)
    {
        return _dict.Contains(item);
    }

    public void CopyTo(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        _dict.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return _dict.Count; }
    }

    public bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { return true; }
    }

    public bool Remove(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item)
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException();
    }

    public IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _dict.GetEnumerator();
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator 
           System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return ((System.Collections.IEnumerable)_dict).GetEnumerator();
    }
}

Obviously, you can change the this[] setter above if you want to allow modifying values.

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3  
You did not implement equality check, which is a very important feature for immutable data structures. –  Elazar Leibovich Sep 15 '09 at 6:01
2  
Looks like all you did is take a standard Dictionary and throw exceptions all over the place...? "Immutable" doesn't have to mean "useless." Quite the contrary. –  Richard Berg Mar 10 '10 at 3:42
4  
So much rancor here, when the poster clearly meant "Read-Only" rather than "Immutable". I think this wrapper probably fit his needs, hence the high score. I'm glad people came out and got a bit more theoretical, but let's not lose sight of what the OP actually needed. –  Egor Sep 9 '10 at 1:09
10  
@Everyone else: In case you're wondering like I was, it seems some people make a difference between "Read-Only" and "Immutable". An "immutable" dictionary can have an Add method that returns a new dictionary with the element added to it, whereas a "read-only" one doesn't, and the only way to get a useful instance of a "read-only" dictionary is to build a normal Dictionary, and then construct a "read-only" wrapper for it. –  Stefan Monov Sep 23 '10 at 8:51
2  
@Stefan: The distinction as I see it is not in whether there's any way to construct a new collection from an existing one. A collection like the one in this answer has a read-only interface: anyone who is passed an instance of this can not modify it, but it is not guaranteed that no one can modify it. (Someone with the original backingDict could modify the collection.) Immutable collections, on the other hand, are guaranteed not to be modified by anyone. –  Joren Mar 27 '11 at 12:55
show 15 more comments

I don't think so. There is a way to create a read-only List and read only Collection, but I don't think there's a built in read only Dictionary. System.ServiceModel has a ReadOnlyDictinoary implementation, but its internal. Probably wouldn't be too hard to copy it though, using Reflector, or to simply create your own from scratch. It basically wraps an Dictionary and throws when a mutator is called.

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As mentioned in the answer below by Dylan, since .NET 4.5 there IS a built-in solution. –  sinelaw Oct 15 '13 at 17:59
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The open-source PowerCollections library includes a read-only dictionary wrapper (as well as read-only wrappers for pretty much everything else), accessible via a static ReadOnly() method on the Algorithms class.

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One workaround might be, throw a new list of KeyValuePair from the Dictionary to keep the original unmodified.

var dict = new Dictionary<string, string>();

dict.Add("Hello", "World");
dict.Add("The", "Quick");
dict.Add("Brown", "Fox");

var dictCopy = dict.Select(
    item => new KeyValuePair<string, string>(item.Key, item.Value));

// returns dictCopy;

This way the original dictionary won't get modified.

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Adding onto dbkk's answer, I wanted to be able to use an object initializer when first creating my ReadOnlyDictionary. I made the following modifications:

private readonly int _finalCount;

/// <summary>
/// Takes a count of how many key-value pairs should be allowed.
/// Dictionary can be modified to add up to that many pairs, but no
/// pair can be modified or removed after it is added.  Intended to be
/// used with an object initializer.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="count"></param>
public ReadOnlyDictionary(int count)
{
    _dict = new SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>();
    _finalCount = count;
}

/// <summary>
/// To allow object initializers, this will allow the dictionary to be
/// added onto up to a certain number, specifically the count set in
/// one of the constructors.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="key"></param>
/// <param name="value"></param>
public void Add(TKey key, TValue value)
{
    if (_dict.Keys.Count < _finalCount)
    {
        _dict.Add(key, value);
    }
    else
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException(
            "Cannot add pair <" + key + ", " + value + "> because " +
            "maximum final count " + _finalCount + " has been reached"
        );
    }
}

Now I can use the class like so:

ReadOnlyDictionary<string, string> Fields =
    new ReadOnlyDictionary<string, string>(2)
        {
            {"hey", "now"},
            {"you", "there"}
        };
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With the release of .NET 4.5, there is a new ReadOnlyDictionary class. You simply pass an IDictionary to the constructor to create the immutable dictionary.

Here is a helpful extension method which can be used to simplify creating the readonly dictionary.

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Also, there is a new add-on (nuGet) library from Microsoft called Immutable collections –  sinelaw Oct 15 '13 at 17:49
    
The difference between ImmutableDictionary (from Immutable Collections), and the ReadOnlyDictionary mentioned in this answer, is that you can get a new ImmutableDictionary with the changes you want to apply (instead of mutating the existing object). –  sinelaw Oct 15 '13 at 17:56
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"Out of the box" there is not a way to do this. You can create one by deriving your own Dictionary class and implementing the restrictions you need.

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I've found an implementation of an Inmutable (not READONLY) implementation of a AVLTree for C# here.

An AVL tree has logarithmic (not constant) cost on each operation, but stills fast.

http://csharpfeeds.com/post/7512/Immutability_in_Csharp_Part_Nine_Academic_Plus_my_AVL_tree_implementation.aspx

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Since Linq, there is a generic interface ILookup. Read more in MSDN.

Therefore, To simply get immutable dictionary you may call:

using System.Linq;
// (...)
var dictionary = new Dictionary<string, object>();
// (...)
var read_only = dictionary.ToLookup(kv => kv.Key, kv => kv.Value);
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4  
This isn't the same because a lookup maps keys to a list of values. You can just only put one value in, but you can also just not write to a dictionary if you're going to do without compile-time support anyway. –  Instance Hunter Nov 4 '09 at 13:23
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You could try something like this:

private readonly Dictionary<string, string> _someDictionary;

public IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, string>> SomeDictionary
{
    get { return _someDictionary; }
}

This would remove the mutability problem in favour of having your caller have to either convert it to their own dictionary:

foo.SomeDictionary.ToDictionary(kvp => kvp.Key);

... or use a comparison operation on the key rather than an index lookup, e.g.:

foo.SomeDictionary.First(kvp => kvp.Key == "SomeKey");
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In general it is a much better idea to not pass around any dictionaries in the first place (if you don't HAVE to).

Instead - create a domain-object with an interface that doesn't offer any methods modifying the dictionary (that it wraps). Instead offering required LookUp-method that retrieves element from the dictionary by key (bonus is it makes it easier to use than a dictionary as well).

public interface IMyDomainObjectDictionary 
{
    IMyDomainObject GetMyDomainObject(string key);
}

internal class MyDomainObjectDictionary : IMyDomainObjectDictionary 
{
    public IDictionary<string, IMyDomainObject> _myDictionary { get; set; }
    public IMyDomainObject GetMyDomainObject(string key)         {.._myDictionary .TryGetValue..etc...};
}
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There's also another alternative as I have described at:

http://www.softwarerockstar.com/2010/10/readonlydictionary-tkey-tvalue/

Essentially it's a subclass of ReadOnlyCollection>, which gets the work done in a more elegant manner. Elegant in the sense that it has compile-time support for making the Dictionary read-only rather than throwing exceptions from methods that modify the items within it.

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3  
Your implementation flattens the input Dictionary to a List, then performs queries searching for Key in the flattened list. Isn't that query now running in linear time (slow) on the flattened list, instead of in logorithmic time (fast) of the original dictionary? –  dthorpe Oct 30 '10 at 6:27
    
@dthrope, yes technically you are right, but unless your dictionary has thousands and thousands of items, for which an in-memory dictionary might not be a suitable data structure anyway, does it really make a difference in todays world with machines running with multiple quad core processors and gigabytes of memory? Yeah, for example, a search might take 1.01 millisecond as opposed to 1.0 millisecond, but does that call for a more complex design? In most cases the answer would be no. –  SoftwareRockstar Nov 1 '10 at 21:21
    
While I am against premature optimization, if a developer chooses a dictionary from a toolbox the expectation is that the internal implementation uses a hash table. –  TrueWill Apr 13 '11 at 16:13
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