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Could anyone explain these undefined behaviors (i = i++ + ++i , i = i++, etc…)

int main()
{
int a=5,s;
s=++a + ++a;
printf("%d",a);
printf("%d",s);
}

output is 7 and 14

BUT

int main()
{
int a, s;
printf("Enter value of a");
scanf ("%d",&a);
s=++a + ++a;
printf("%d",a);
printf("%d",s);
}

input user gives is 5 output is 7 and 13

WHY?

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marked as duplicate by Naveen, Vladimir, dirkgently, paxdiablo, codaddict Aug 17 '10 at 9:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I see 714 for the 2nd example too: ideone.com/vJbaH –  Blindy Aug 17 '10 at 9:04
    
There are so many duplicates of this on SO. For example: stackoverflow.com/questions/2902638/post-and-pre-increment-in-c or stackoverflow.com/questions/949433/… –  Naveen Aug 17 '10 at 9:05
1  
@Blindy: The ++a + ++a part alone is sufficient. a is modified twice without any intervening sequence point. That's it. See c-faq.com/expr/evalorder2.html –  jamesdlin Aug 17 '10 at 9:17
1  
It's still undefined behaviour, even with two pre-increments AFAIK - the second pre-increment can happen after the first read or before. Or indeed anything else - as it's undefined. –  Douglas Leeder Aug 17 '10 at 9:18
4  
It is undefined, Blindy. Appendix C of the standard does not list + as a sequence point. It makes no difference whether it's a pre or post increment, it's the dual modification without intervening sequence point that makes it undefined. The correct output is a set consisting of any damn thing the compiler wants to do :-) –  paxdiablo Aug 17 '10 at 9:18

4 Answers 4

Undefined behaviour:

s=++a + ++a;

Anything can happen when undefined, so your behaviour is perfectly valid.

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Missing the point. –  Blindy Aug 17 '10 at 9:06
1  
@Blindy: Perhaps you could explain, exactly, what point is missing. –  Greg Hewgill Aug 17 '10 at 9:22
    
He's missing the point that regardless of this line, both the OP's versions of the code should (and do) return the same thing on the same compiler. That's what the question is actually about. –  Blindy Aug 17 '10 at 9:24
    
@Blindy: That's not what the question says. 14 != 13. –  Greg Hewgill Aug 17 '10 at 9:28
4  
No, Blindy, I think you're missing the point: undefined means exactly that, undefined. It's perfectly acceptable for even the first program on its own to give a totally different, random, answer every time you run it. It's also perfectly acceptable for the compiler to format your hard disk, or for space to fold in on itself and form a singularity. The fact that you have the same int going in and the same statement is irrelevant. The compiler is free to do whatever it wants. That's why you don't use undefined behaviour! –  paxdiablo Aug 17 '10 at 9:32

I'd suspect this is an artifact of compiler optimisation, in the first example a is known so the compiler optimises the preincrements to occur before the addition. In the second example the value is unknown and the compiler does not optimise the sequence causing it to complete left to right. This may be a function of your specific compiler and it would need to be looked at specifically.

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Undefined behaviour. Change it, or you risk being attacked by raptors.

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hi budy this coding working correctly in VI compiler ..

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