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I've been using the following code, given to me by HansUp (cheers!), and it's been working great:

SELECT g.ID, Count(t.Grade) AS Total
FROM grade AS g 
LEFT JOIN (SELECT Grade FROM telephony WHERE [Date] BETWEEN #08/16/2010# AND #08/20/2010#) AS t ON g.ID=t.Grade 
GROUP BY g.ID 
ORDER BY 2 DESC; 

I'm now looking to find the TOP 5 results returned. I thought it would be as simple as:

SELECT **TOP 5** g.ID, Count(t.Grade) AS Total
FROM grade AS g 
LEFT JOIN (SELECT Grade FROM telephony WHERE [Date] BETWEEN #08/16/2010# AND #08/20/2010#) AS t ON g.ID=t.Grade 
GROUP BY g.ID 
ORDER BY 2 DESC; 

Unfortunately that's not working.

Does anyone have any ideas.

Thanks

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Which version of ms access ? –  Vash - Damian Leszczyński Aug 17 '10 at 9:58
    
Sorry, Access 2003 –  Richard L Aug 17 '10 at 10:04
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3 Answers 3

The TOP clause will get you the top based on your first sort field. Since your first sort field is a constant (2) for all records, you get all records. Add the ID field to your ORDER BY clause and you'll only get five records.

SELECT TOP 5 g.ID, Count(t.Grade) AS Total
FROM grade AS g LEFT JOIN (SELECT Grade FROM telephony WHERE [Date] BETWEEN #08/16/2010# AND #08/20/2010#)  AS t ON g.ID = t.Grade
GROUP BY g.ID
ORDER BY g.ID, 2 DESC;

If you're actually after the top 5 by Total in descending order, change the SQL to the following:

SELECT TOP 5 g.ID, Count(t.Grade) AS Total
FROM grade AS g LEFT JOIN (SELECT Grade FROM telephony WHERE [Date] BETWEEN #08/16/2010# AND #08/20/2010#)  AS t ON g.ID = t.Grade
GROUP BY g.ID
ORDER BY Count(t.Grade) DESC , 2 DESC;

This is top by value, so if multiple records have a total that is the same and it happens to be in the top 5 value of Total, you'll get them all back. If you truly only ever want five records back, you have to sort on a field that is unique.

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Awesome, thank you very much. One final question tho. How can I use DISTINCT and TOP 5 in the query above? Thanks –  Richard L Aug 18 '10 at 10:05
    
@Richard L - What's your aim with including a DISTINCT keyword? –  Simon Kingston Aug 19 '10 at 18:44
    
I have a table with duplicate entries which correspond to another table. I.e if Grade A or Grade B are chosen they fall into the Grade Category 1 so in the grade category table it looks like this: ID | GradeID | Name 1 1 Category 1 2 1 Category 1 3 2 Category 2 By not using distinct, the grades are counted for each instance of the grade category. Im trying to only count them once. Thanks –  Richard L Aug 23 '10 at 8:13
    
@Richard L - I'm not seeing this Grade Category table in your question. Are you trying to relate the results of the SQL above to this table somehow? Please elaborate. –  Simon Kingston Aug 23 '10 at 19:26
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This should work.

SELECT TOP 5 g.ID, Count(t.Grade) AS Total
FROM grade AS g 
LEFT JOIN (SELECT Grade FROM telephony WHERE [Date] BETWEEN #08/16/2010# AND #08/20/2010#) AS t ON g.ID=t.Grade 
GROUP BY g.ID 
ORDER BY 2 DESC
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, I get the error The SELECT statement includes a reserved word or an arguement name that is misspelled or missing, or the punctuation is incorrect. –  Richard L Aug 17 '10 at 10:09
    
@Richard, i've corrected the syntax is SELECT TOP n with out (), do you get some other error while you run this query ? –  Vash - Damian Leszczyński Aug 17 '10 at 10:24
    
Vash, thanks for the reply. I've tried this and the query does run, unfortunately it doesnt return only 5 results, it returns them all. Cheers for your help –  Richard L Aug 17 '10 at 10:30
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So far as I can see, this should work:

  SELECT TOP 5 g.ID, Count(t.Grade) AS Total
  FROM grade AS g 
  LEFT JOIN (SELECT Grade FROM telephony WHERE [Date] BETWEEN #08/16/2010# AND #08/20/2010#) AS t ON g.ID=t.Grade 
  GROUP BY g.ID 
  ORDER BY Count(t.Grade) DESC;

The key point here is that you use the full expression from the SELECT statement when you want to use it in a WHERE or ORDER BY clause.

If you'd just use the Access query grid to write your SQL, you would have gotten the correct results right off the bat (though you'd have to dip into SQL view to write your subquery).

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