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I am working on a Java-script, for which I need regular expression to check whether the entered text in text-box should be combination of alphabets and numeric value.

I tried NaN function of java-script but string should be of minimum-size & maximum-size of length 4 and start with Alphabet as first element and remaining 3 element should be numbers.

For example : Regular expression for A123, D456, a564 and not for ( AS23, 1234, HJI1 )

Please suggest me !!!

Code Here:

<script type="text/javascript">
  var textcode = document.form1.code.value;
  function fourdigitcheck(){
    var textcode = document.form1.code.value;
    alert("textcode:"+textcode);
    var vmatch = /^[a-zA-Z]\d{3}$/.test("textcode");
    alert("match:"+vmatch);
    }
</script>
<form name="form1">
 Enter your Number  <input type="text" name="code" id="code"   onblur="fourdigitcheck()" />
</form>
share|improve this question
    
Javascript specific: javascriptkit.com/jsref/regexp.shtml –  rubber boots Aug 17 '10 at 12:26
    
after your modification, the line 6: var vmatch = /^[a-zA-Z]\d{3}$/.test("textcode"); has to be changed: var vmatch = /^[a-zA-Z]\d{3}$/.test(textcode); –  rubber boots Aug 17 '10 at 12:41
    
change: var vmatch = /^[a-zA-Z]\d{3}$/.test("textcode"); to: var vmatch = /^[a-zA-Z]\d{3}$/.test(textcode); and it will work fine. see: jsfiddle.net/E2Kfr –  Floyd Aug 17 '10 at 13:07
    
@Rubber : Thanks Dear, It really works !!! @Floyddotnet : Awesome Dude, your script is really nice one ....Thanks a lot for giving me such a nice idea !!! –  Rubyist Aug 17 '10 at 13:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Minimal example:

<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
<form id="form" name="form" action="#">
  <input type="text" onkeyup=
   "document.getElementById('s').innerHTML=this.value.match(/^[a-z]\d\d\d$/i)?'Good':'Fail'" 
   />
  <span id="s">?</span>
</form>
</html>
share|improve this answer
^[A-Z]{1}\d{3}$

or shorter

^[A-Z]\d{3}$

Description:

// ^[A-Z]\d{3}$
// 
// Assert position at the start of the string or after a line break character «^»
// Match a single character in the range between "A" and "Z" «[A-Z]»
// Match a single digit 0..9 «\d{3}»
//    Exactly 3 times «{3}»
// Assert position at the end of the string or before a line break character «$»

Test:

/*
A123 -> true
D456 -> true
AS23 -> false
1234 -> false
HJI1 -> false
AB456 -> false
*/
share|improve this answer
    
he doesn't say anything about first letter being capital (though all examples do): /^[a-z]\d{3}$/i –  Amarghosh Aug 17 '10 at 11:44
    
Sorry dear, it is not working !!! –  Rubyist Aug 17 '10 at 12:05
    
@Rahul dear, the regex is correct - post the code that you're using to test it. –  Amarghosh Aug 17 '10 at 12:19
    
@Amaraghosh: he doesn't say that not. all exampels he post are capital. –  Floyd Aug 17 '10 at 12:34

This website will tell you exactly what you need to know.

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Regexp:

var match = /^[a-zA-Z][0-9]{3}$/.test("A456"); // match is true
var match = /^[a-zA-Z][0-9]{3}$/.test("AB456"); // match is false

http://www.regular-expressions.info/javascriptexample.html - there's an online testing tool where you can check if it works all right.

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Are you sure /[a-zA-Z][0-9]{3}/.test("AB456") is false? –  KennyTM Aug 17 '10 at 11:38
    
KennyTM .. you have right, its true because its match "B456" –  Floyd Aug 17 '10 at 11:39
    
Sorry for that! This version should be all right. –  MartyIX Aug 17 '10 at 11:42
    
Sorry dear, it is not working !!! –  Rubyist Aug 17 '10 at 12:09
    
I don't know if your comment was before update or after. –  MartyIX Aug 17 '10 at 13:15

If you want both upper and lower case letters then /^[A-Za-z][0-9]{3}$/

else if letters are upper case then /^[A-Z][0-9]{3}$/

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/[A-Z][0-9]{3}/

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