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Currently i'm catching up on Haskell, and I'm super impressed so far. As a super simple test I wrote a program which computes the sum up till a billion. In order to avoid list creation, I wrote a function which should be tail recursive

summation start upto 
  | upto == 0 = start
  | otherwise = summation (start+upto) (upto-1)

main = print $ summation 0 1000000000

running this with -O2 I get a runtime of about ~20sec on my machine, which kind of surprised me, since I thought the compiler would be more optimising. As a comparison I wrote a simple c++ program

#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  long long result = 0;
  int upto = 1000000000;

  for (int i = 0; i < upto; i++) {
    result += i;
  }
  std::cout << result << std::end;
  return 0;
}

compiling with clang++ without optimisation the runtime is ~3secs. So I was wondering why my Haskell solution is so slow. Has anybody an idea?

On OSX:

clang++ --version:

Apple LLVM version 7.0.2 (clang-700.1.81)
Target: x86_64-apple-darwin15.2.0
Thread model: posix

ghc --version:

The Glorious Glasgow Haskell Compilation System, version 7.10.3
share|improve this question
8  
It's noteworthy that it's unnecessary. I realise that this may be a simple test of recursion and so on, but Euler's triangular number formula is relevant here. Let's not forget that simple math is far faster than other methods. – AJFarmar Jan 26 at 19:30
4  
also, your start variable is misleadingly named – njzk2 Jan 26 at 19:51
    
It's defaulting to arbitrary-precision arithmetic. That's always going to be slower than 32-bit arithmetic. – MathematicalOrchid Jan 26 at 19:56
up vote 33 down vote accepted

Adding a type signature dropped my runtime from 14.35 seconds to 0.27. It is now faster than the C++ on my machine. Don't rely on type-defaulting when performance matters. Ints aren't preferable for, say, modeling a domain in a web application, but they're great if you want a tight loop.

module Main where

summation :: Int -> Int -> Int
summation start upto 
  | upto == 0 = start
  | otherwise = summation (start+upto) (upto-1)

main = print $ summation 0 1000000000


[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( code/summation.hs, code/summation.o )
Linking bin/build ...
500000000500000000
14.35user 0.06system 0:14.41elapsed 100%CPU (0avgtext+0avgdata 3992maxresident)k
0inputs+0outputs (0major+300minor)pagefaults 0swaps

Linking bin/build ...
500000000500000000
0.27user 0.00system 0:00.28elapsed 98%CPU (0avgtext+0avgdata 3428maxresident)k
0inputs+0outputs (0major+171minor)pagefaults 0swaps
share|improve this answer
1  
wow thanks! I did not think that the type annotation made such a huge impact :) – Moe Jan 26 at 17:39
4  
@Moe I feel you, but that's a bit like saying you're surprised the data matters. Letting the types default is like letting the compiler decide how your data is structured in Haskell. Much of the time, especially during development or for example code, this is fine. It's also fine to allow types to be inferred, especially if you have signatures elsewhere to dictate the type. However, if you care about perf...yeah write the type down :) – bitemyapp Jan 26 at 17:47
4  
As the other question mentions, when Haskell has no other clues what kind of number you want, the arbitrary-size Integer is the default. – comingstorm Jan 26 at 17:49
1  
Which is the right default IMO re: defaulting to Integer - Ints can overflow which is no bueno. – bitemyapp Jan 26 at 17:50
9  
@Moe, it's not really the type signature that makes a difference. It's the fact that you are telling Haskell to use machine-size integers (Int) instead of arbitrary-precision integers (Integer), the default. In this case the most direct way to do that is to add a type signature specifying Int. – Reid Barton Jan 26 at 18:28

Skip the strike-out unless you want to see the unoptimized (non -O2) view.

Lets look at the evaluation:

summation start upto 
  | upto == 0 = start
  | otherwise = summation (start+upto) (upto-1)

main = print $ summation 0 1000000000

-->

summation 0 1000000000

-->

summations (0 + 1000000000) 999999999

-->

summation (0 + 1000000000 + 999999999) 999999998

-->

summation (0 + 1000000000 + 999999999 + 999999998) 999999997

EDIT: I didn't see that you had compiled with -O2 so the above isn't occuring. The accumulator, even without any strictness annotations, suffices most of the time with proper optimization levels.

Oh no! You are storing one billion numbers in a big thunk that you aren't evaluating! Tisk! There are lots of solutions using accumulators and strictness - it seems like most stackoverflow answers with anything near this question will suffice to teach you those in addition to library functions, like fold{l,r}, that help you avoid writing your own primitive recursive functions. Since you can look around and/or ask about those concepts I'll cut to the chase with this answer.

If you really want to do this the correct way then you'd use a list and learn that Haskell compilers can do "deforestation" which means the billion-element list is never actually allocated:

main = print (sum [0..1000000000])

Then:

% ghc -O2 x.hs
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( x.hs, x.o )
Linking x ...
% time ./x
500000000500000000
./x  16.09s user 0.13s system 99% cpu 16.267 total

Cool, but why 16 seconds? Well by default those values are Integers (GMP integers for the GHC compiler) and that's slower than a machine Int. Lets use Int!

% cat x.hs
main = print (sum [0..1000000000] :: Int)
tommd@HalfAndHalf /tmp% ghc -O2 x.hs && time ./x
500000000500000000
./x  0.31s user 0.00s system 99% cpu 0.311 total
share|improve this answer
1  
Nope, the strictness analyzer will catch the thunk leak (since OP built with optimizations). – Reid Barton Jan 26 at 17:35
1  
Yep, I just noticed the -O2 in the question. – Thomas M. DuBuisson Jan 26 at 17:37
    
yep, i learned about the -O2 the hard way :), but nice way to add the type annotation to sum (or is this on the list?). i did not now that – Moe Jan 26 at 17:47
1  
@Moe The type annotation covers the whole expression f x :: a says the function f applied to x is of type a. This is the same as (f x) :: a. Perhaps calling it the "type of the result" is simpler. – Thomas M. DuBuisson Jan 26 at 18:19

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