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I want a regular expression to match input like:

3213.32.2311

Format required is:

  • Four numeric characters
  • a .
  • 2 numeric characters
  • a .
  • 4 numeric characters.
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2  
And where is the "problem"? –  pmod Aug 17 '10 at 12:54
    
@Pmod: Laziness? ;-) –  Chris Aug 17 '10 at 12:58
2  
Getting other people to write code snippets for you is about the worst possible way to learn anything about coding. If you don't understand something, questions like 'Why does this regexp mean this' will actually help you learn. –  Tom Medley Aug 17 '10 at 13:26
    
Is there a question the OP has asked that isn't "gimme the codez", closed or a dup? –  msw Aug 17 '10 at 14:36

4 Answers 4

Get yourself a regex cheatsheet such as http://www.regular-expressions.info/reference.html

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1  
Though they look daunting, they're really not that bad. I can never remember the syntax - so a good cheat sheet is a must. –  Tom Medley Aug 17 '10 at 13:01
    
Also, reading a guide/cheatsheet and writing the expression yourself will help you learn the syntax much quicker than a copy-paste answer. –  Peter Boughton Aug 17 '10 at 13:23
^\d{4}\.\d{2}\.\d{4}$
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(These) (are) (pointless) –  Peter Boughton Aug 17 '10 at 13:18
    
@Peter - sorry, force of habit. I virtually never write a regex where I don't care about what the different parts are. –  Dominic Rodger Aug 17 '10 at 13:21
    
Perhaps you should use regex more then. ;) I frequently have quick jobs that don't need captures. But no problem, it's just a little thing that bugs me (though not quite as much as ^(this)$ when $0 or \0 is already available). Could be useful to mention both ways in your answer, in case it helps with what the OP is doing. :) –  Peter Boughton Aug 17 '10 at 13:29

Try: \d{4}\.\d{2}\.\d{4}

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\d{4}\.\d{2}\.\d{4}

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2  
Need to escape the dot. –  slebetman Aug 17 '10 at 12:54
1  
Annoyingly enough I did, but StackOverflow editing escaped it. Had to do \\. –  NebulaFox Aug 17 '10 at 12:59

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