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Given the following classes and controller action method:

public School
{
  public Int32 ID { get; set; }
  publig String Name { get; set; }
  public Address Address { get; set; }
}

public class Address
{
  public string Street1 { get; set; }
  public string City { get; set; }
  public String ZipCode { get; set; }
  public String State { get; set; }
  public String Country { get; set; }
}

[Authorize(Roles = "SchoolEditor")]
[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post)]
public SchoolResponse Edit(Int32 id, FormCollection form)
{
  School school = GetSchoolFromRepository(id);

  UpdateModel(school, form);

  return new SchoolResponse() { School = school };
}

And the following form:

<form method="post">
  School: <%= Html.TextBox("Name") %><br />
  Street: <%= Html.TextBox("Address.Street") %><br />
  City:  <%= Html.TextBox("Address.City") %><br />
  Zip Code: <%= Html.TextBox("Address.ZipCode") %><br />
  Sate: <select id="Address.State"></select><br />
  Country: <select id="Address.Country"></select><br />
</form>

I am able to update both the School instance and the Address member of the school. This is quite nice! Thank you ASP.NET MVC team!

However, how do I use jQuery to select the drop down list so that I can pre-fill it? I realize that I could do this server side but there will be other dynamic elements on the page that affect the list.

The following is what I have so far, and it does not work as the selectors don't seem to match the IDs:

$(function() {
  $.getJSON("/Location/GetCountryList", null, function(data) {
    $("#Address.Country").fillSelect(data);
  });
  $("#Address.Country").change(function() {
    $.getJSON("/Location/GetRegionsForCountry", { country: $(this).val() }, function(data) {
      $("#Address.State").fillSelect(data);
    });
  });
});
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6 Answers 6

up vote 176 down vote accepted

From Google Groups:

Use two backslashes before each special character.

A backslash in a jQuery selector escapes the next character. But you need two of them because backslash is also the escape character for JavaScript strings. The first backslash escapes the second one, giving you one actual backslash in your string - which then escapes the next character for jQuery.

So, I guess you're looking at

$(function() {
  $.getJSON("/Location/GetCountryList", null, function(data) {
    $("#Address\\.Country").fillSelect(data);
  });
  $("#Address\\.Country").change(function() {
    $.getJSON("/Location/GetRegionsForCountry", { country: $(this).val() }, function(data) {
      $("#Address\\.State").fillSelect(data);
    });
  });
});

Also check out How do I select an element by an ID that has characters used in CSS notation? on the jQuery FAQ.

share|improve this answer
1  
Damn you're fast! Thank you! –  Doug Wilson Dec 8 '08 at 17:54
3  
I wonder what the rationalization is for requiring the developer to do this, it seems like a simple set of heuristics within jQuery would solve this problem, since there isn't anything wrong with ID's with periods in them... –  Jason Bunting Mar 24 '09 at 22:46
4  
If you didn't have to escape, how would you query an element with ID Address and class State (granted that if you know the ID you aren't adding much by specifying the class, but it should still be valid, I'd think)? –  bdukes Mar 25 '09 at 13:12
11  
For that reason, in CSS itself, you must escape a dot in an ID, too. All jQuery is doing is requiring you to follow the rules set out by CSS. –  bdukes Apr 6 '09 at 14:11
4  
You could also select by name instead of ID. For example, $('[name="Address.Country"]') –  Funka Aug 20 '09 at 4:03

You can't use a jQuery id selector if the id contains spaces. Use an attribute selector:

$('[id=foo bar]').show();

If possible, specify element type as well:

$('div[id=foo bar]').show();
share|improve this answer
    
I prefer doing it this way than using the escape characters.... Obviously the best workaround is not to use periods in the id. –  GordonB Jul 13 '10 at 14:01
    
good tips. I also use these in case of 'foo.bar' –  Imrul Aug 19 '10 at 8:12
    
Spaces are not allowed in id's, not even in HTML5's more liberal acceptance of characters. stackoverflow.com/questions/70579/… –  Jay Blanchard Jun 5 '13 at 20:52
    
True, but whether they are allowed or not doesn't matter to the poor sap who's stuck adding window dressing to a poorly-written web app deployed in the late 90s. –  Elliot Nelson Jun 6 '13 at 17:55

The Release Candidate of ASP.NET MVC that was just released fixed this issue, it now replaces the dots with underscores for the ID attribute.

<%= Html.TextBox("Person.FirstName") %>

Renders to

<input type="text" name="Person.FirstName" id="Person_FirstName" />

For more information view the release notes, starting on page 14.

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1  
I fail to see how this is a "fix" - why should ASP.NET MVC have to change the ID to something jQuery needs? I think jQuery is where the problem lies, not using a . in an ID. –  Jason Bunting Mar 24 '09 at 22:41
6  
the dot has special meaning in CSS to identify/combine classes, which is why having it in an ID is troublesome. The "problem" is not with jquery. –  Funka Aug 20 '09 at 4:02

Escape it for Jquery:

function escapeSelector(s){
    return s.replace( /(:|\.|\[|\])/g, "\\$1" );
}

usage example:

e.find('option[value='+escapeSelector(val)+']')

more info here.

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Just additional information: Check this ASP.NET MVC issue #2403.

Until the issue is fixed, I use my own extension methods like Html.TextBoxFixed, etc. that simply replaces dots with underscores in the id attribute (not in the name attribute), so that you use jquery like $("#Address_Street") but on the server, it's like Address.Street.

Sample code follows:

public static string TextBoxFixed(this HtmlHelper html, string name, string value)
{
    return html.TextBox(name, value, GetIdAttributeObject(name));
}

public static string TextBoxFixed(this HtmlHelper html, string name, string value, object htmlAttributes)
{
    return html.TextBox(name, value, GetIdAttributeObject(name, htmlAttributes));
}

private static IDictionary<string, object> GetIdAttributeObject(string name)
{
    Dictionary<string, object> list = new Dictionary<string, object>(1);
    list["id"] = name.Replace('.', '_');
    return list;
}

private static IDictionary<string, object> GetIdAttributeObject(string name, object baseObject)
{
    Dictionary<string, object> list = new Dictionary<string, object>();
    list.LoadFrom(baseObject);
    list["id"] = name.Replace('.', '_');
    return list;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
from the abovementioned issue: "UpdateModel() uses a dot because that's how the form elements come in. The form elements use a dot because that's how they're specified in the HTML helper calls. The HTML helper calls use a dot because that's how ViewData.Eval() works. Finally, ViewData.Eval() uses a dot because that's how one separates an object and its property in the main .NET Framework languages. Using a delimiter other than a dot at any point in this chain would break the flow for the entire chain." –  Simon_Weaver Dec 16 '12 at 0:06

Using two Backslashes it´s ok, it´s work. But if you are using a dynamic name, I mean, a variable name, you will need to replace characters.

If you don´t wan´t to change your variables names you can do this:

var variable="namewith.andother";    
var jqueryObj = $(document.getElementById(variable));

and than you have your jquery object.

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